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Discussion Starter #1
I'll be buying a set of wheels/tires for winter shortly and I will have the TPMS sensors included. What is the process for the car to learn the new sensors? Is it just plug-and-play or does it require a TPMS tool?

Found some old threads via Advanced Search but not exactly what I was looking for.

Thanks.
Rob
 

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Looks like they are the same as other models, special tool needed:
 

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What is the process for the car to learn the new sensors? Is it just plug-and-play or does it require a TPMS tool?
Here is a link to the 2017 TPMS Section from the shop manual,
26 pages, I did not read it, too early in the AM for that. o_O

2017 TPMS
 

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Thank goodness my car does not have TPMS.

My previous car had it - and what a headache that was. I ended up putting in twenty-cent valve stems and bought myself a tire pressure gauge.

That might be a viable solution if you can get past the constant TPMS error message.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I am with you. This is the 2nd vehicle I've owned which has TPMS and I've never found any value to having it, though at least with the Santa Fe I can see the pressure readings displayed on the dash. Common sense and a pressure gauge are enough.

On my previous vehicle I drove around with the TPMS light on constantly during winters and I don't want to do that again. If my tire installer doesn't have the tool I will buy the tool and manage the seasonal tire/wheel changes myself.
 

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The value of the TPMS systems is that unlike most of the folks here, far too many drivers are almost completely ignorant when it comes to tire pressures. Many do not even understand that tire pressure drops 1 PSI for every 10 degree loss of air temp, so every fall they roll in one after another for the "warranty repair" because their low tire pressure indicators are on.

As a safety tool the system does have value even to those here as it may point out that you are losing pressure due to a puncture between the times you actually check the screen values.

.
 

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My old 2001 Windstar had a rest button, hold for 5 seconds to extinguish the lamp.
Should be on all vehicles with TPMS.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The value of the TPMS systems is that unlike most of the folks here, far too many drivers are almost completely ignorant when it comes to tire pressures. Many do not even understand that tire pressure drops 1 PSI for every 10 degree loss of air temp, so every fall they roll in one after another for the "warranty repair" because their low tire pressure indicators are on.

As a safety tool the system does have value even to those here as it may point out that you are losing pressure due to a puncture between the times you actually check the screen values.

.
I understand your points, and you may be right about the value of detecting a slow leak. It's just that I'm twelve years in to my TPMS 'journey' and it has saved me zero times but annoyed me plenty of times.
 

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Does the TPMS nag you beyond lighting up a signal light?

Personally I learned to "deal with it" on my previous car. I check tire pressure at least once a month and before/during big trips.
 

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I do this with winter tires. In another thread someone had a solar tpms system that just used special valve caps.

The TPMS on both my Hyundais is worthless as it does not tell you the tire let alone pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Does the TPMS nag you beyond lighting up a signal light?

Personally I learned to "deal with it" on my previous car. I check tire pressure at least once a month and before/during big trips.
Okay, well maybe I came across as a bit harsh and whiny. I have been "dealing with it" on my previous car for a number of years, so yes - I can do it that way.

Here's the thing, though. I like everything to be in order on my car. If I'm driving around in this brand new car and I have to look at the light being on for four months out of the year, it bugs me.

The good news is that I'm going to have the new wheels and tires on in a couple of weeks and my local tire place can handle the TPMS programming. That takes care of this winter. Next I'll have to figure out the routine for seasonal swapping.

Thanks all for the comments and discussion points.
 

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I just put my winter wheels on and I bought tpms sensors on ebay for the wheels. Just need to drive for awhile and it'll recognize them. No programming is needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I just put my winter wheels on and I bought tpms sensors on ebay for the wheels. Just need to drive for awhile and it'll recognize them. No programming is needed.
Wow, this is good news. Thanks RiceR.
 

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I have the Tires Plus tire guy switch out my tires, and I asked him three years ago so he does it automatically when I bring it in. The tool basically resets the TPMS and it relearns the new code while you are driving.. I have had one instance where I had the old tires in the car, and it relearned the old code. I'm old enough where I don't need to change the tires to save $15 so I let them do it.

I had my snow tires put on at Costco, and they put nitrogen in the tires. I had them do my regular tires with nitrogen, as well. Every time I put them on, I get the spares freshened up at Costco. The nitrogen doesn't contract as much as oxygen. I have not had any problems with the TPMS light coming on at all.
 

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I read online that you do not need a tool. Just drive and the system will learn the new sensors and their placement in about 10 miles or less.
 
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