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Well, I left it right to the last minute this year for the i10. Just had the winter boots put on this morning as we're expecting severe snow overnight tonight.

It was interesting going to the tyre shop this morning on the factory Continentals, the car was sliding around all over the place off the main gritted highways. Once the winter boots went on, the car felt absolutely planted, 100 percent safer.

I know not everyone can afford another set of tyres or wheels, but if you've never used winter rubber before, it is like night and day over standard summer tyres in sub-zero temperatures. It does make me chuckle though, the people who absolutely insist that we don't need to use winter tyres in this country and that one just needs to adapt one's driving style to accomodate more severe conditions. That is just utter garbage in my opinion. Winter tyres are safer, period, and now that we use them every year, my opinion won't change. The last severe winter we experienced, I was able to quite happily drive up steep hills without losing traction, whilst dodging cars sliding backwards into other parked cars. Let's see what tomorrow brings......:auto:
 

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I used to run "traction tires" all year long, and I actually had a set of Deltas I bought used that were excellent wet, dry, snow, or ice. Needless to say, they don't make them any more...the caveat being Delta tires tend to wear out ~40,000 miles. Since then I have gone back to dedicated tires for summer and winter. Good summer tires give good wet handling and excellent dry handling, and the winter tires are far superior in the cold climes around here in the winter. Never, ever going back to "all-season" tires again.

Unless Delta starts making that tire again...they were $40US NEW. At that price I can't complain about the wear (however, I bought them used for $65 for 4)
 

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I remember a few years back it took me 6 hours to get home from work after heavy snowfall that's an hour for each mile.
The biggest problem was a hill where the snow had turned to ice. and all the rear wheel drive cars were pilled up at the bottom no one could get anywhere, a colleague who had a 4x4 with all terrain tyres/tires was also stuck in the heavy traffic jam we eventually had to abandon our cars and walk home.
I could have got up the hill with my front wheel drive and my colleague most certainly could but it just went to prove you cant go any faster than the car in front or indeed anywhere if the road is blocked with abandoned vehicles.
I think that until winter tyres/tires are compulsory for rear wheel drive cars they may not offer very much advantage.
 
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