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Hi y'all,

I've looked around the forum and I can't seem to find the information I am looking for, so I am starting this thread.

I am going to do the alignment on my 2018 Elantra Sport and I wanted to see if anybody knows the factory specs for the Camber, Caster, and Toe. I've read that the Elantra Sport needs all 4 wheels aligned instead of just the front like average sedans, is that correct?

Thanks for the help
 

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Unless you have damaged something, caster and camber seldom need adjusting. I just use my eyeball to set toe in-out. Camber can be done well enough using a level held vertically against the tire.
I would have thought there would be more front toe-out than is indicated here. Someone has posted the specs for an older Elantra in this thread.
 

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Hi y'all,

I've looked around the forum and I can't seem to find the information I am looking for, so I am starting this thread.

I am going to do the alignment on my 2018 Elantra Sport and I wanted to see if anybody knows the factory specs for the Camber, Caster, and Toe. I've read that the Elantra Sport needs all 4 wheels aligned instead of just the front like average sedans, is that correct?

Thanks for the help
 

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Was dumped in the planet well before Hunter wheel alignment, everybody was doing their own alignment, did my own on my motorhome, they want both arms and legs for that.

Rear wheels are just camber and toe in and stay that was if accident free, use to change springs, leaf or coil and shock absorbers, for vehicle level. new vehicles are the same, 4 wheel alignment is a major crooked lie and they charge over twice as much for it.

Measure the centers of the front and rear wheels with a tape measure, should be identical, carpenters level is just fine, but have to be on level ground.

Camber in the front is the same as the rear, perpendicular to the ground, just a tiny tolerance, Some vehicles, like a Cadillac may have an off centered bolt in the lower strut that offers some camber adjustment, way too rich for our Elantra. Some suggest redrilling the upper holes in the shock tower to move the strut sideways, this will greatly weaken that tower and may end up killing you.

Caster is a real easy test, just make a sharp turn, steering wheel should self center, but again, no way to adjust it.

This only leaves front wheel toe in, for years, going back to a Model A, 1/8" less on centers in the front than the rear, Specs were posted kindly above. 0.08 to 0.12" darn close to an 1/8"

Stuck a sharp nail in a block, rotate each front tire to scribe a mark in each tire. And this was a bit of work, Do have a level side driveway, had to block up all six wheels because you have to crawl under it, had an eight foot long rod with one fixed pointer on one end, the other side could be moved with a lock bolt on it. Son and I on the rear to the marks, on the front, 1/8" closer, could eyeball, that, Loosen both steering links, release the lock nut and turn both sides equally to keep your steering wheel centered than done.

Took my last car in for new tires, free alignment check, car was on the rack with four wheel centers, called me back to tell me the front toe in was a 1/32" too much, and this is the only adjustment on that car plus our Elantras, Wanted 85 bucks to correct it. I use my fist to hit the rear of the tire that made it 1/32" of an inch too much, and commented, + or- 1/32" is well within tolerance and kept that 85 bucks plus tax in my pocket.

You can buy a tire thread depth gauge for a couple of bucks on less your want a digital one for ten bucks. Front tires in particular the depths from both sides and the center should be the same, if different, you may need an alignment, if the same, you are fine. Also keep your tires properly inflated to the label specs on the drivers door jam.

Higher will be a more rough ride with slight increases in fuel economy, lower a softer ride, but either more tire wear.

A bad joke on our Elantras and most cars is MacPherson Strut Suspension. Only good thing about it, saves a couple bucks on front suspension using only one control rod. Two would always keep the front tires perpendicular to the ground, one is like moving stick up and down like an arc, the distance is constantly changing scrubbing the tire back and forth sideways wearing it out. Would gladly pay that extra two bucks for that extra top control arm.

But not really saving us money, especially if you pay to have your tires rotated every 7,500 miles. This in no way decreases the wear, but just evens it out between the front of the rear.

Also look at thread wear warranty, you would never collect on this because a zillion reasons why your tires will wear fast, but least gives an idea how long they will last if driven sanely.
 

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  1. Please don’t do what these people are saying. Get the car on a real alignment rack and do a proper alignment. You cannot eyeball tenths of a degree. You can’t align a car by punching the tires. The guy above me is literally measuring alignment in inches, please ignore everything he said.
  2. Only thing I change from the factory alignment on the sport is setting the front toe around 0.10 as it’ll make the steering a bit more responsive.
 
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