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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thankful that Hyundai replaced the engine in my 2012 Sonata, but the dealership was way behind and it sat for 6 months. When I do get it back in the next week or two (fingers crossed), what should I be on the lookout for? Seems like a car sitting un-operational for that long may have issues. Thank you.
 

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had cars parked longer. not a big deal. mostly you need to check for damage or stains that weren't there when you gave it to them.

Seen cars backed into, or door dinged. or stains in the headliner from people climbing in and out dirty.
 

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2019 Hyundai Sonata SE White
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  • Immediately check the exterior of the car for any body damage that occured at the dealership. Make sure nothing stolen such as spare tire.
  • Check tire pressure and condition.
  • Check all fluid levels. Check accessory belt and filters
  • On starting car, listen for unusual noises or operation. Make sure all panel lights are extinguished.
  • Let car idle in park for at least a minute or two to circulate oil.
  • Put car in drive gear and listen for clunks or grinding or odd operation. Repeat in reverse.
  • Hold brakes to assure they maintain pedal pressure. Check parking brake operation.
  • Test brakes at low speed in safe place to assure proper operation. Expect rust on rotors that should immediately disappear with first use
  • Moving slowly around dealership parking lot, test steering, listening for unusual noises.
  • Gently drive on street/highway until proper operating temperature is reached. Watch for overheating or warning lights.
  • Test air conditioning and all other systems for function. Return to dealership if anything doesn't work properly.
  • When car is at operational temperature and it is safe, test acceleration and braking.
  • In empty parking lot, make maximum steering wheel lock turn left and right.
  • Immediately return to dealer if any squawks found.
  • Refuel car to dillute old gas.
  • Give car a gentle, good hand wash to remove grime, grit or pollution.
  • Over next month, monitor daily fluid levels and leaks.

Good luck.
 

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If it was actually sitting for six months, I would change the oil and filter.
 

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Tires for sure. Sitting in one spot for that length of time on one spot of the tire(s) can have negative consequences to the tire(s). Drive it turn off the radio and listen for strange noises and see if there any vibrations especially at highway speeds. Other than that for the most part it should be fine. Like others have said though do a visual inspection for damages both interior and exterior.
 

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just to make it easier on yourself for damage, I took the print out that rental cars give you to mark damage before you take the car and used that to call out stuff when they did a repair.
 

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lizhowell You must be the most patient person in the world. i would never of waited that long that's complete B.S. on the dealer side i would of been done with hyundai a long time ago the 1st week. the fact you let it drag this long is your fault i would of been seeking a lawyer.
 

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lizhowell You must be the most patient person in the world. i would never of waited that long that's complete B.S. on the dealer side i would of been done with hyundai a long time ago the 1st week. the fact you let it drag this long is your fault i would of been seeking a lawyer.
I'd be checking with a lawyer that specializes in the Lemon Law. Each state is different, but six months is not acceptable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'd be checking with a lawyer that specializes in the Lemon Law. Each state is different, but six months is not acceptable.
I certainly appreciate your point of view @Packard8 and @Johns2.0T. This situation was complicated by staffing issues at the dealership and the absence of an alternative dealership in my area. I spent weeks on the phone with Hyundai corporate, but was repeatedly told that until the engine failure is deemed a recall event, they could/would do nothing. The short version is this dealership has over 2 dozen Sonatas awaiting new engines, and it took months for them to even start the approval process through Hyundai. I was given a rental car at their expense (even before engine replacement was approved) for the entire 6 months. Was it a hassle? Yes. But I opted for patience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Tires for sure. Sitting in one spot for that length of time on one spot of the tire(s) can have negative consequences to the tire(s). Drive it turn off the radio and listen for strange noises and see if there any vibrations especially at highway speeds. Other than that for the most part it should be fine. Like others have said though do a visual inspection for damages both interior and exterior.
Thank you. Good suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
  • Immediately check the exterior of the car for any body damage that occured at the dealership. Make sure nothing stolen such as spare tire.
  • Check tire pressure and condition.
  • Check all fluid levels. Check accessory belt and filters
  • On starting car, listen for unusual noises or operation. Make sure all panel lights are extinguished.
  • Let car idle in park for at least a minute or two to circulate oil.
  • Put car in drive gear and listen for clunks or grinding or odd operation. Repeat in reverse.
  • Hold brakes to assure they maintain pedal pressure. Check parking brake operation.
  • Test brakes at low speed in safe place to assure proper operation. Expect rust on rotors that should immediately disappear with first use
  • Moving slowly around dealership parking lot, test steering, listening for unusual noises.
  • Gently drive on street/highway until proper operating temperature is reached. Watch for overheating or warning lights.
  • Test air conditioning and all other systems for function. Return to dealership if anything doesn't work properly.
  • When car is at operational temperature and it is safe, test acceleration and braking.
  • In empty parking lot, make maximum steering wheel lock turn left and right.
  • Immediately return to dealer if any squawks found.
  • Refuel car to dillute old gas.
  • Give car a gentle, good hand wash to remove grime, grit or pollution.
  • Over next month, monitor daily fluid levels and leaks.

Good luck.
Thank you so much for taking the time to create this detailed list. I sincerely appreciate it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
had cars parked longer. not a big deal. mostly you need to check for damage or stains that weren't there when you gave it to them.

Seen cars backed into, or door dinged. or stains in the headliner from people climbing in and out dirty.
Thank you. Good suggestions.
 

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I certainly appreciate your point of view @Packard8 and @Johns2.0T. This situation was complicated by staffing issues at the dealership and the absence of an alternative dealership in my area. I spent weeks on the phone with Hyundai corporate, but was repeatedly told that until the engine failure is deemed a recall event, they could/would do nothing. The short version is this dealership has over 2 dozen Sonatas awaiting new engines, and it took months for them to even start the approval process through Hyundai. I was given a rental car at their expense (even before engine replacement was approved) for the entire 6 months. Was it a hassle? Yes. But I opted for patience.
I get it but theres a difference between being reasonable & stupity... if the tables were turned on them where they for example had to waite for You to come in for service do you think they would waite 6 months? dought it.
 

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I certainly appreciate your point of view @Packard8 and @Johns2.0T. This situation was complicated by staffing issues at the dealership and the absence of an alternative dealership in my area. I spent weeks on the phone with Hyundai corporate, but was repeatedly told that until the engine failure is deemed a recall event, they could/would do nothing. The short version is this dealership has over 2 dozen Sonatas awaiting new engines, and it took months for them to even start the approval process through Hyundai. I was given a rental car at their expense (even before engine replacement was approved) for the entire 6 months. Was it a hassle? Yes. But I opted for patience.
hi Liz, did you get your car back yet? I've waited about 4 months and due to "COVID" they're claiming they don't know when I would receive my repair since a part that belongs on the Turbo is manufactured in a country that is shut down because of COVID. like yourself, I've been placed in a rental vehicle on their expense, but I'm becoming impatient because I want to enjoy my car as intended when I bought it! did you notice any issues with your vehicle upon return?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
hi Liz, did you get your car back yet? I've waited about 4 months and due to "COVID" they're claiming they don't know when I would receive my repair since a part that belongs on the Turbo is manufactured in a country that is shut down because of COVID. like yourself, I've been placed in a rental vehicle on their expense, but I'm becoming impatient because I want to enjoy my car as intended when I bought it! did you notice any issues with your vehicle upon return?
I did receive my car back, and it seems to be running fine -- though I am keeping a close eye on it. I think you have little option other than to wait. Hyundai under the recall has an obligation to replace the engine and provide a rental car, but they have no obligation to return your vehicle to you on a specific timeframe. I know others here have said "get a lawyer!" But civil suits can either seek 1) performance or 2) damages. Hyundai (through the dealership) is performing its obligation, even if it's slow -- so that would not go anywhere. You may be able to seek compensation for delay after you receive the car back (that is actually covered on the settlement website, though it is minimal). If anything, stop by the dealer in person, be kind, be understanding, and that may move your car to the front of the line when your engine arrives. I've been told here I'm exhibiting "stupity." But I assure you; I'm not stupid.
 

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I did receive my car back, and it seems to be running fine -- though I am keeping a close eye on it. I think you have little option other than to wait. Hyundai under the recall has an obligation to replace the engine and provide a rental car, but they have no obligation to return your vehicle to you on a specific timeframe. I know others here have said "get a lawyer!" But civil suits can either seek 1) performance or 2) damages. Hyundai (through the dealership) is performing its obligation, even if it's slow -- so that would not go anywhere. You may be able to seek compensation for delay after you receive the car back (that is actually covered on the settlement website, though it is minimal). If anything, stop by the dealer in person, be kind, be understanding, and that may move your car to the front of the line when your engine arrives. I've been told here I'm exhibiting "stupity." But I assure you; I'm not stupid.
That's true, I'm going to do just that!
 
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