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I assume some of you guys do your own oil changes. I have always used Royal Purple synthetic in all my cars - track and street - and intend to use it in my sons new Limited. I'm struck by the fact that the owners manual doesn't list a preferred oil other than5-20 or 10-30.

Do any of you use synthetics in your Sonata?
 

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QUOTE (Brewster @ Oct 1 2010, 09:46 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=360278
I assume some of you guys do your own oil changes. I have always used Royal Purple synthetic in all my cars - track and street - and intend to use it in my sons new Limited. I'm struck by the fact that the owners manual doesn't list a preferred oil other than5-20 or 10-30.

Do any of you use synthetics in your Sonata?

I've actually been thinking about this. I have free scheduled services from my dealer for 5/50 so I'm gonna be using whatever oil hyundai sends to their dealers. At BMW it was castrol. After that 50k mark, I will be going with Royal Purple as well. I have a Canton racing (non-bypass) filter and housing I can use but Im wondering if the dealer techs would know what to do with it. Id only add that after break-in anyway.
 

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QUOTE (Brewster @ Oct 1 2010, 10:46 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=360278
I assume some of you guys do your own oil changes. I have always used Royal Purple synthetic in all my cars - track and street - and intend to use it in my sons new Limited. I'm struck by the fact that the owners manual doesn't list a preferred oil other than5-20 or 10-30.

Do any of you use synthetics in your Sonata?
I have an 06 Sonata LX6 and an 06 Azera Limited and have been using Mobil 1 after the 1st oil change on each car. I buy it at Costco when it is on sale and bring it into the dealer when it's time for an oil service. I change the oil between 5 to 6,000 miles even though I am sure I could take it to 7,500 miles. Both cars have been winners, for me. :grin: Don
 

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QUOTE (Brewster @ Oct 1 2010, 09:46 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=360278
I assume some of you guys do your own oil changes. I have always used Royal Purple synthetic in all my cars - track and street - and intend to use it in my sons new Limited. I'm struck by the fact that the owners manual doesn't list a preferred oil other than5-20 or 10-30.

Do any of you use synthetics in your Sonata?

I thought 5-30 was also on the OK list in the manual.

At 2,900 I went to the dealer and brought along 5-30 Mobil 1. Just took that out last weekend at 8,300 and am awaiting the results of an oil analysis. I replaced it with 5-30 Mobil 1 Extended, not so much because I intend to go anywhere near the product's claim of 15K drain intervals but because M1 Extended is one of a handful of oils that are supposedly TRUE synthetic (and not just meeting the legally minimum threshhold of being able to be called synthetic).

But I just like to play around with products a little and it's probably way more of an oil than what I need. It probably barely matters on an engine teardown at 150K which oil is used, as long as it's kept within the manufacturer's specs and changed when needed.
 

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QUOTE (robspeedGLS @ Oct 1 2010, 11:06 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=360281
so I'm gonna be using whatever oil hyundai sends to their dealers.
Hyundai does not sell/supply oil to dealers.. they buy from local vendor with big truck that come out and fill oil tank.. our place is Mobil 10/30 (at least that what old sticker on tank says).

You want synthetic, we sell Mobil-1 5/30 that they buy in the 6 qt bottle case from outside vendor..

The only oils we get with Hyundai label on them is Gear oils and Auto Tran Fluids of different flavors for all the transmissions we currently have.
 

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QUOTE (Klooks Kleek @ Oct 2 2010, 12:53 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=360292
I replaced it with 5-30 Mobil 1 Extended, not so much because I intend to go anywhere near the product's claim of 15K drain intervals but because M1 Extended is one of a handful of oils that are supposedly TRUE synthetic

Yep, group IV base stock. I put regular M1 since I change it every 5K miles due to extreme weather, dust galore, and mostly short distances. With M1 EP you should be able to safely go 7,500 miles, as long as you don't drive like I do, or you risk depleting the additives. Do an oil analysis to make sure your long intervals are safe for your engine.

By the way, there're several truly synthetic oils, but are a little more expensive. Besides M1 EP, you have Pennzoil Ultra, Castrol Edge, Castrol Syntech 0/30 (made in Germany), etc. Plus 'boutique' oils like Redline, Red Purple, Motul, etc.
 

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QUOTE (elp_jc @ Oct 3 2010, 12:43 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=360520
Yep, group IV base stock. I put regular M1 since I change it every 5K miles due to extreme weather, dust galore, and mostly short distances. With M1 EP you should be able to safely go 7,500 miles, as long as you don't drive like I do, or you risk depleting the additives. Do an oil analysis to make sure your long intervals are safe for your engine.

By the way, there're several truly synthetic oils, but are a little more expensive. Besides M1 EP, you have Pennzoil Ultra, Castrol Edge, Castrol Syntech 0/30 (made in Germany), etc. Plus 'boutique' oils like Redline, Red Purple, Motul, etc.


On BITOG, Pennzoil reps indicated that Ultra was a Type III oil. I was not under the impression base stock III was a "full synthetic"?

QUOTE
11. Are the base stocks group III, IV, or V?

Pennzoil Ultra™ is blended with Group III base stocks. These give superior solvency performance to Group IV base stocks, which we believe aids our aim to provide oil that delivers as close to “Factory Clean”. Rather than focus on any single component in the formulation, we focus on the end product.
Source: http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/cms/index.ph...2&Itemid=80
 

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QUOTE (Bearcats @ Oct 3 2010, 12:53 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=360628
I was not under the impression base stock III was a "full synthetic"?
It's not. Pennzoil Platinum is group III, and Pennzoil Ultra is supposed to be group IV, but maybe it's not. I'm not going to buy it anyway :grin:. Will read that link later to be better informed about that. Thanks for the heads up.
 

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Keep in mind that while running 5w-30 will give you engine better protection, you will lose a decent amount of fuel economy. The reason that new cars are using 5w-20 is that they build the engines better now to handle thinner oil, thereby giving the engine better MPG.
 

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QUOTE (Dave Priz @ Oct 3 2010, 08:07 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=360733
Keep in mind that while running 5w-30 will give you engine better protection, you will lose a decent amount of fuel economy.
I'd say 'minimal' amount of fuel economy, but good point. Since I don't want to sacrifice engine protection for fuel economy (pretty hot here in TX for 5W/20 IMO), I went with Mobil1 0W/30, which is also 'energy conserving', just like 5W/20. And remember the '0' and '5' numbers is not viscosity folks; just how easy oil flows when cold, but as common sense dictates, oil is a lot thicker cold than hot, so lower numbers are not comparable to higher ones. All manufacturers are going to recommend 0/20 from now on, to appease the EPA. That's right, what the EPA says is not necessarily the best for your engine, but manufacturers need all the help they can get to lower their CAFE standards. That's why I'll keep using '30' in this extreme climate, where it freezes in winter and exceeds 100ºF for 3 months in summer. Grade 0W/30 represents the best of both worlds: thinner for winter start-ups, and thicker for extreme summer temperatures, while still being 'energy conserving'. Good day.
 

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If I recall correctly, Castrol was the first to call Group III oil synthetic. As you may recall, they were sued. Their argument was that the extra step they used when hydrocracking the oil gave it properties that were very close to true Group IV PAO synthetic oils. They won their law suit and opened the door for any oil company to call Group III oil synthetic provided they use the extra step in the hydrocracking process. In Germany, I believe it is still against their laws to call any Group III oil synthetic.

Royal Purple always seems to bring up another conversation. I've never seen it formally documented and wonder if it is actually true. Not only is Royal Purple a true Group IV PAO synthetic oil but it is suppose to contain some Group V oil. I believe Group V oils are derived from esters. Not being a chemist, I have no idea what means, but the word on the street is that it provides better engine protection than Group IV alone. That is one reason RP costs so much more than regular Group IV full synthetic oils. However there is supposed to be downside to the Group V component. It breaks down rapidly, like 5,000 miles or less. It is best used for racing (high rpm, a lot of heat) in which oil changing intervals are short. Has anyone heard this story?
 

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QUOTE (Blue07 @ Oct 4 2010, 03:45 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=360956
If I recall correctly, Castrol was the first to call Group III oil synthetic. As you may recall, they were sued. Their argument was that the extra step they used when hydrocracking the oil gave it properties that were very close to true Group IV PAO synthetic oils. They won their law suit and opened the door for any oil company to call Group III oil synthetic provided they use the extra step in the hydrocracking process. In Germany, I believe it is still against their laws to call any Group III oil synthetic.

Royal Purple always seems to bring up another conversation. I've never seen it formally documented and wonder if it is actually true. Not only is Royal Purple a true Group IV PAO synthetic oil but it is suppose to contain some Group V oil. I believe Group V oils are derived from esters. Not being a chemist, I have no idea what means, but the word on the street is that it provides better engine protection than Group IV alone. That is one reason RP costs so much more than regular Group IV full synthetic oils. However there is supposed to be downside to the Group V component. It breaks down rapidly, like 5,000 miles or less. It is best used for racing (high rpm, a lot of heat) in which oil changing intervals are short. Has anyone heard this story?
I have read about RP not having the longevity or true TBN necessary for extended OCI's. Wish I could find it, but I read enough that made me discount it for my own personal uses.
 

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I rather use a group III 'synthetic' for 5K miles than a group VI or V for 7,500 or longer, especially where I live: brutal heat for 4 months, mild freezes for 2 months, and tons of dust and wind year round. Oh, and short distances most of the time. That kills the additive package on any oil, so rather play it safe at 5K-mile OCIs. My opinion is group IV and V oils are overkill if not used on long OCIs.

My only exception is the M3, which stupid BMW 'recommends' 10/60 Castrol TWS oil (group V), when Lamborghini, Ferrari and Porsche are okay with 5/40 (or even 0/40), and the former 2 rev as high as the M3. Anyway, I understand using that oil on the track (Lambo recommends 20/50 for track conditions), but for people who drive on the streets, it's overkill, not to mention thick as **** for winter start-ups. But for fear of losing engine warranty, I use it, but only becuase it doesn't get that cold here. I only put about 4K miles a year on that car, so end up throwing perfectly good oil away prematurely. But waiting 15K miles, as BMW recommends, is over the top as well. Most owners do a 'mid' change, at 7.5K miles. I'd do the same.

Hey, surprised to see a civil oil discussion :grin:. Good job folks :thumbsup: .
 

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QUOTE (elp_jc @ Oct 4 2010, 06:32 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=361035
I rather use a group III 'synthetic' for 5K miles than a group VI or V for 7,500 or longer, especially where I live: brutal heat for 4 months, mild freezes for 2 months, and tons of dust and wind year round. Oh, and short distances most of the time. That kills the additive package on any oil, so rather play it safe at 5K-mile OCIs. My opinion is group IV and V oils are overkill if not used on long OCIs.

My only exception is the M3, which stupid BMW 'recommends' 10/60 Castrol TWS oil (group V), when Lamborghini, Ferrari and Porsche are okay with 5/40 (or even 0/40), and the former 2 rev as high as the M3. Anyway, I understand using that oil on the track (Lambo recommends 20/50 for track conditions), but for people who drive on the streets, it's overkill, not to mention thick as **** for winter start-ups. But for fear of losing engine warranty, I use it, but only becuase it doesn't get that cold here. I only put about 4K miles a year on that car, so end up throwing perfectly good oil away prematurely. But waiting 15K miles, as BMW recommends, is over the top as well. Most owners do a 'mid' change, at 7.5K miles. I'd do the same.

Hey, surprised to see a civil oil discussion :grin:. Good job folks :thumbsup: .

A very common myth is that oil starts out thick and gets thin. In fact, the opposite is true. Multiweight oil uses polymers that thicken up with heat. so 10/60 oil, at cold start-up, is only 10-weight oil. It only gets THICK at operating temps. "Stupid" BMW recommends this oil because the oil they started out with was chunking engines left and right. I was a tech during the time they did this switch (02-03) and the engine bearings that came out of chunked motors were not pretty!
 

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QUOTE (Bearcats @ Oct 4 2010, 03:05 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=360962
I have read about RP not having the longevity or true TBN necessary for extended OCI's. Wish I could find it, but I read enough that made me discount it for my own personal uses.

RP says they go to 12k max, but only after your engine is cleaned out and only on tight, fuel injected motors that dont burn oil or suck gas (overrich carbed cars) into the crankcase. On my BMW with 145-185k on the clock I did it every 10k, with a filter change at 5k (this was before I got the Canton racing filter setup).
 

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QUOTE (robspeedGLS @ Oct 4 2010, 07:45 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=361040
A very common myth is that oil starts out thick and gets thin.
What??? You need to do some reading man. Or better yet, see for yourself. Put oil from your car on the fridge and compare it with the one you drain when hot. It's simple common sense. The 'winter' number is not related to viscosity. Otherwise 0W/xx oil would be water when cold :grin:. Cold oil gets pretty thick, but the lower the number, the better it flows. Google is your friend.
 

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QUOTE (robspeedGLS @ Oct 4 2010, 07:51 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=361041
RP says they go to 12k max, but only after your engine is cleaned out and only on tight, fuel injected motors that dont burn oil or suck gas (overrich carbed cars) into the crankcase. On my BMW with 145-185k on the clock I did it every 10k, with a filter change at 5k (this was before I got the Canton racing filter setup).
I read OCI analysis for RP. I wont be using the product in any of my vehicles. My .02 is RP is a marketing machine (Only if clean, tolerance..etc, lots of fine print there that I dont see on their website so I am assuming those are your words.); getting up there with Mobil1. But thats my opinion, not a fact.

In my vehicles, I use AMSOil for extended OCI. Have been using Pennz Plat in cars under warranty because I get good deals on the oil and a filter for an oil change. The cars I drive to work fall under severe operation so no extended OCI, while under warranty, but still dont wish to use conventional. Contemplating the move to Ultra but have to read more data from people doing OCI analysis.

And the polymers are added for strand stability and prevent sheering. The strand unwinds as it heats up, the polymers allow for stability for extended weight changes. When you have more extreme weight differences such as a 5W-40 or the more common 0W-40 it's as stable as a 10W-30. I think what you were trying to relay was that an oil, for example 5W-30, that's an actual 30 with additives and so forth to make it act like a 5W when cold.
 

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To potentially repeat what Bearcats wrote, multi viscosity oil starts as the lower weight oil. For example with a 5W30 oil, the base oil is a 5 weight. Then the engineers add polymers to that 5W so as it heats, it behaves like a 30W oil. The idea is that when the oil is cold, say 70*F or less, all the polymers are wound up and the oil behaves as if they were not there. When the oil is cold, it flows like the 5 weight oil that it is. Of course as any oil gets hot, it gets thinner. When the engine reaches operating temperature and the oil is ~200*F, a 5 weight oil would be way too thin to provide adequate lubrication. Somehow those polymers begin to unwind as the oil heats, so by the time the oil is near 200*F, they are fully unwound and make the oil behave as if it were a 30 weight. Bear in mind, a 30W oil (or even 60 weight oil) at ~200*F is much, much thinner than a 5 weight oil at 70*F or less.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
QUOTE (Bearcats @ Oct 4 2010, 09:56 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=361090
I read OCI analysis for RP. I wont be using the product in any of my vehicles. My .02 is RP is a marketing machine (Only if clean, tolerance..etc, lots of fine print there that I dont see on their website so I am assuming those are your words.); getting up there with Mobil1. But thats my opinion, not a fact.

In my vehicles, I use AMSOil for extended OCI. Have been using Pennz Plat in cars under warranty because I get good deals on the oil and a filter for an oil change. The cars I drive to work fall under severe operation so no extended OCI, while under warranty, but still dont wish to use conventional. Contemplating the move to Ultra but have to read more data from people doing OCI analysis.

And the polymers are added for strand stability and prevent sheering. The strand unwinds as it heats up, the polymers allow for stability for extended weight changes. When you have more extreme weight differences such as a 5W-40 or the more common 0W-40 it's as stable as a 10W-30. I think what you were trying to relay was that an oil, for example 5W-30, that's an actual 30 with additives and so forth to make it act like a 5W when cold.
LOL - there is always an Amsoil "true believer" in every forum pushing that brand over any "inferior" oil. Sure thing.
I've used RP in every vehicle I've owned since it became available and have NEVER had an issue with it. Tearing down my race engines were absolutely spotless inside with so little wear on bearings and rings to be immeasurable. I even use it in my lawn mower and 10k wtt emergency generator. Everything with a gas or diesel motor. I used it exclusively in my old 1985 Chevy Suburban 6.2 diesel that had almost 200k miles on it when I sold it after 18 years, and it is still running strong with 18+ mpg towing a 25' trailer since my buddy bought it from me.

I also use RP gear oil in the transfer case and front and rear diffs in my 04 Dodge Ram hemi in addition to the engine. Zero issues all around.

If there is such a thing as a "marketing machine", it is Amsoil. Funny I've never seen RP advertized on TV except channels concerning performance vehicles.
 
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