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In Jan, I sold my 2018 Sonata Limited 2.0t plus to my son as we wanted a 2020 Santa Fe Limited 2.0t. While in the dealership for my first SF oil change, I noticed a beautiful new Sonata Limited 1.6t on the showroom floor. I did a double take as I couldn't believe my eyes, the 2.0t engine was gone and the 1.6t replaced it. What the heck is going on here, a 1.6t in a Sonata, So, I thought, maybe the 2.0t is available as an option! Yeah, that's got to be it. After tracking down the sales manager, he explained that the only engines available for the 2020 Sonata is the 1.6t and the 2.4 naturally aspirated engine. I must say, if I were looking for a new midsized sedan, even as beautiful as the new Sonata is, I'd pass on the car due to the " mini mouse" engine! I know, it's just one ole car guys opinion, that's for sure, but can't help thinking --WHAT THE HECK WAS HYUNDAI THINKING?
 

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2012 Sonata 2.0t Ltd & 2020 Palisade Ltd
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In Jan, I sold my 2018 Sonata Limited 2.0t plus to my son as we wanted a 2020 Santa Fe Limited 2.0t. While in the dealership for my first SF oil change, I noticed a beautiful new Sonata Limited 1.6t on the showroom floor. I did a double take as I couldn't believe my eyes, the 2.0t engine was gone and the 1.6t replaced it. What the heck is going on here, a 1.6t in a Sonata, So, I thought, maybe the 2.0t is available as an option! Yeah, that's got to be it. After tracking down the sales manager, he explained that the only engines available for the 2020 Sonata is the 1.6t and the 2.4 naturally aspirated engine. I must say, if I were looking for a new midsized sedan, even as beautiful as the new Sonata is, I'd pass on the car due to the " mini mouse" engine! I know, it's just one ole car guys opinion, that's for sure, but can't help thinking --WHAT THE HECK WAS HYUNDAI THINKING?
There's an N-line model coming for MY 2021. It'll have a turbocharged 2.5L engine with at least 290 hp, a new wet-clutch 8-speed dual-clutch transmission, and both GDi and MPi.

There's info out there about that car if you search this forum or browse the net (some journalists have seen it).
 

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The 1.6T moves the Tucson very well. It will do the same for the Sonata. I've driven both.
 

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2012 Sonata 2.0t Ltd & 2020 Palisade Ltd
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The 1.6T moves the Tucson very well. It will do the same for the Sonata. I've driven both.
Different engine. The Tuscon was using a 1.6L Turbo Gamma engine, whereas the Sonata is using a 1.6L Turbo Smartstream engine, which is a new family of engines for 2020.

But this new 1.6T does indeed seem peppy, from what I see posted in this forum.
 

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Different engine. The Tuscon was using a 1.6L Turbo Gamma engine, whereas the Sonata is using a 1.6L Turbo Smartstream engine, which is a new family of engines for 2020.

But this new 1.6T does indeed seem peppy, from what I see posted in this forum.
Power output is similar so performance should be close. I own one and have the other at work.
 

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I think part of the reason Hyundai announced the Sonata N-Line so early was to telegraph that an engine that competes with Accord and Camry high-end engines was down the road. The challenge with that though is not everyone will want thickly bolstered sport seats, a hard suspension, and some of the other boy racer features. I came from an Elantra GT Sport with the 1.6L engine and 7 speed DCT. The engine in the Sonata isn't as perky but they are two different applications. The Sonata which is 300 lbs heavier gets does about 4 mpg better being driven the same way and its not even broken in yet. The logic of making the 1.6L the high-end mainstream engine in the Sonata is to deliver great acceleration in 85% of people's typical driving experiences while at the same time delivering comparably great MPG. I'm happy with it but would have gotten the N-Line if it were available.
 

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Nobody remembers a couple years back when the Sonata ECO-1.6T beat the Sonata 2.0T?

My latest daily driver has a 1.4T and a manual transmission. It is as competent as any 2.3-2.5L sedan from Honda/Toyota/Hyundai/Kia/Mazda. And, with the boost, it is more enjoyable with a manual than those snowflakematic transmissions. I bought a manual to make it theft proof since a couple generations are clutch incapable.
I drove the 1.6T both in Gamma and the newer SmartShitz version and they are very competent and can be enjoyable if the driver has a brain. DCT is a nightmare for fools. 8-speed slushbox was a smart move expecially when the 6-speed was programmed better than the 'competitors'. Mazda needs to teach the domestics and competitor Asian automakers on how to program a transmission. Hyundai was close. Toyota is pathetic, as are some of the automaker 6-10 speeds.

I don't care for DCT and think it would be a mistake.....after the market failure of the 1.6T/7speed DCT's. 8 speed slushbox or 6 speed manual would be perfect. Test drive the 6-speed manual Jetta GLI 2.0T or Honda Accord 2.0T if you're clutch competent. And, even though Camry 8-speed is a joke, the 2GR makes up for it. I'll take a V6 over a 2.0T any day!

N-line= marketing joke for small minded consumers.... the 3 engines should be available in all trims

I hope that N-line 2.0T doesn't translate as 500lbs of extra useless options to make it as slow as the 2.4! Probably will because that is what marketing wants.

8 speed DCT? I hope not. Bubbleboy consumers can't deal with mechanical 'communication' from a vehicle. Wet clutches might not numb a DCT enough. Who wants to be a beta-tester?
 

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2020 Hyundai Sonata SEL
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Engine downsizing has actually been going on for many years now. A number of new cars are coming with these “mini mouse” engines compared to their body weight or size. Honda Accord 1.5, Mercedes E class 2.0, Audi A6 2.0, Volvo XC90 2.0, heck even a BMW i8 has a 1.5 engine and the Mustang can be bought with a 2.3.
The keys are the turbo, torque and HP. The results are better mileage than more “traditional” 2.5 and v6 engines.

Hyundai or other manufacturers are not going to be able to match every consumers personal choice, preference or opinion.
 

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I'll just chime in to say... I haven't owned any other Hyundai, but this 1.6t is impressive. Quick on the take off and for passing. Certainly handles everyday driving well. Then, good gas mileage. I came from a 200HP sport sedan. This Hyundai is faster out of the gate.

I drove the two 2020 Sonata engines three times. Salesman loved it (not really). It was the turbo spunk that got me. I questioned myself, why am I buying a smaller engine with less HP? No regrets.
 

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I have a 2017 Sonata Eco with the 1.6T. Which by the way supports HP Tuners. I have a tune on mine. 1st and second blow the tires off now, and 3rd is useless in the rain. It puts you in the seat. Def faster than the 2.0 was.
 

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There's an N-line model coming for MY 2021. It'll have a turbocharged 2.5L engine with at least 290 hp, a new wet-clutch 8-speed dual-clutch transmission, and both GDi and MPi.

There's info out there about that car if you search this forum or browse the net (some journalists have seen it).
Any word on a manual transmission with the new model?
 

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I'm actually kinda wary of "Turbo" engines, isn't that just more parts to break? What's wrong with the regular 2.4?
Granted, the turbo is another part that can fail. But Hyundia's 2.4 hasn't been known to no issues either.... I know I'd never own one of their 2.4s or 2.0Ts due to the failure rate.
 

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Any word on a manual transmission with the new model?
Not gonna happen.

I'm actually kinda wary of "Turbo" engines, isn't that just more parts to break? What's wrong with the regular 2.4?
I mean... yeah. But that's like saying a 6-cylinder engine is more likely to break because it has 2 more cylinders than a 4-cylinder. Turbochargers aren't new technology.

And just to be a little pedantic: the normally-aspirated engine on the 2020 Sonata is 2.5L, not 2.4L. The 2.4 is no longer used on the Sonata as of 2020. And it did fail just as much as the 2.0t, which is also no longer used on the Sonata. Which goes to show you that the issues had nothing to do with the turbo.
 
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