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Discussion Starter #1
So I took in my 2009 Santa Fe SE with 3.3L engine, 135K miles, because I thought the valve cover gasket job I had done a month ago had failed, but they say it isn't the valve cover gasket, but the timing cover gasket this time. (Or maybe was then also, and the VCG was just a misdiagnosis.) They also say the oil pan is leaking, so that will also need to be done, but is less directly my question.

I couldn't afford to have the work done right away (just over $2K), and it isn't a very large leak, so I'm holding off for a bit to squirrel away some money. In the meantime I'm switching the oil over to Pennzoil HM. I know that isn't likely to help, but I figure it can't hurt. I started using Mobil 1 0-30 on this two years ago after my Father in law had fed it a steady diet of Wal-Mart's cheapest oil for the first 100K of its life, so I'm allowing it to go back to conventional with a bit of seal conditioners. Probably nothing happens, worst case scenario, I have to change the timing cover gasket, both valve cover gaskets, and even the oil pan gasket.

So, once I have the cash to let them do this job, and once they have the timing cover off anyway, what else is "right there" and really ought to be replaced? I know with a lot of timing belts, you change the water pump whenever you change the timing belt because you don't want to go back in there. What about this motor? Should the timing chain be replaced as a matter of course? any other guides, pulleys, or other thingmajigs that should be addressed since we're basically just talking parts cost?

Anything else that I should take into consideration? Insist on certain gaskets? reconsider doing anything to the car at all?

Thanks,
Mike
 

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It's a good idea to replace 2 timing chain tensioners, they may start leaking or teeth worn out due to age. You have to remove the oil pan and water pump so you can get a new pump to put in. Check the serpentine belt movement when engine is running, replace belt, tensioner and pulleys if necessary. crank pulley is used to reduce engine vibration, can be critical but it's hard to check, I would replace crank pulley with belt and tensioner. May need electrical impact wrench to remove crank bolt. When the gasket is leaking you should get new PCV to reduce crankcase pressure. I recommend 0w20 engine oil, you can have better MPG if there's no more leaking after replacement. Get an OEM thermostat(valve) after draining the coolant
 

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Does this engine have a timing belt or chains. I don't have my info here right now. Need to know.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Does this engine have a timing belt or chains. I don't have my info here right now. Need to know.
Chain. You asked chains, I don't know anything about singular vs plural, if that's a thing.
 

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When the gasket is leaking you should get new PCV to reduce crankcase pressure.
Would it be of any benefit to do that already, before I have the cover replaced? It seems to me like it might, but I don't know, so I ask.
I recommend 0w20 engine oil, you can have better MPG if there's no more leaking after replacement.
You're recommending this for after the reseal, right? Not saying my 5w30 HM is a bad choice?
 

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Chain. You asked chains, I don't know anything about singular vs plural, if that's a thing.
So...no belt...OK....chain or chains depend on the engine. Some use multiple chains. Like I say I don't have the info on your vehicle in front of me. So long as you DON'T have a belt it's no hurry to get it fixed. A belt would not do well with oil and if it jumped time you would no doubt bend valves. Best thing to do is wait until you have a weekend to get it apart and change out the timing components as well as the cam and crank seals. Be sure to use RTV at the corners of the cover and oil pan.
 

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Chains (3),, all rails, 2 tensioner, drive belt, coolant, water pump (BEWARE of 1 bolt change with new pump, part dept should be able to help,, water hose from pipe to nipple on backside of chain cover,, oil, spark plugs while apart,, stick with plain oil of your choice..

I see no purpose for this "high mileage" crap,, you ran fine all along, why change ?? I went 355.000 with a Toyota 2.0 until burnt exhaust valves put me on side line for week or 2,, another 23,000 intil tail light wiring and inherited ride come along that Toyota got sidelined

If you was local, I'd do it over course of nights for $600 + you buy parts


 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
@grcauto You think its something I can do at home? I got the impression it wasn't something I wanted to try to tackle. Two local shops (one where I am a customer, one where I was until I moved across town and it got ridiculous) both said that they could do it, but that it was really best left to the dealer. That kind of scared me off from tackling it myself.

Glad to know that I have some time though.
 

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Ha! That looks like the oil distribution on mine, except my alternator's not that covered. Yet. It was a month ago before it got replaced.

And if you were local I'd bring it over to you for that deal, but unfortunately you're hiding somewhere!

If you was local, I'd do it over course of nights for $600 + you buy parts
 

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Would it be of any benefit to do that already, before I have the cover replaced? It seems to me like it might, but I don't know, so I ask.
You're recommending this for after the reseal, right? Not saying my 5w30 HM is a bad choice?
You can replace PCV before replacing the cover, wipe clean the engine cover, and see what happens. Maybe that can save you $$$. When you resealing the valve cover, have you applied grease at the gap between timing cover and engine? That's the weak part of the seal and cause "timing cover leaking"

I always recommend 20 engine oil for this engine as owner's manual says, have better engine performance and save you $50-100 on gas before next oil change. If you don't have evidence of burning oil, why 30?

Based on the "4 ball wear test" done by Amsoil, Mobil 1's oil is the worst one for protecting metal to metal wearing. You can use every brand in the Walmart except Mobil 1 and Castrol
 

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You can replace PCV before replacing the cover, wipe clean the engine cover, and see what happens. Maybe that can save you $$$. When you resealing the valve cover, have you applied grease at the gap between timing cover and engine? That's the weak part of the seal and cause "timing cover leaking"

I always recommend 20 engine oil for this engine as owner's manual says, have better engine performance and save you $50-100 on gas before next oil change. If you don't have evidence of burning oil, why 30?

Based on the "4 ball wear test" done by Amsoil, Mobil 1's oil is the worst one for protecting metal to metal wearing. You can use every brand in the Walmart except Mobil 1 and Castrol
I don't understand why you keep thinking PCV valve will cure every oil leak. Even on engines that don't use them. I'm not trying to put you down but help you understand. Once these seals and or gaskets start leaking a new pcv will slow it very little if any. Even if it contributed to the leak. Once the damage is done there's no going back except to repair the leak. If the system uses a pcv it's a good idea to replace it when the job is done. That is a fact.
 

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I don't understand why you keep thinking PCV valve will cure every oil leak. Even on engines that don't use them. I'm not trying to put you down but help you understand. Once these seals and or gaskets start leaking a new pcv will slow it very little if any. Even if it contributed to the leak. Once the damage is done there's no going back except to repair the leak. If the system uses a pcv it's a good idea to replace it when the job is done. That is a fact.
There must be something to release pressure, and PCV is required for every engine in the US. Once the leaking drop to an acceptable level that's enough. For some part of the seal where oil is not soaked all the time, that can actually fix the leaking since when engine oil is dried after a few days it becomes sticky and grabs the seal hard. RTV is flexible and won't get cracked easily
 

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Most all the leak I have seen been result of oil destroy cheap sourced RTV used at time of assembly, even worse when RTV crumble from poor maintain with oil change.. I have pulled bolts out that the aged RTV has never cured

This new stuff we using seem to be tougher when set up,, we try to have assembled before day is done, then leave sit till next morning before add oil and fire up

Something that I am confused on,,

1 - " have you applied grease at the gap between timing cover and engine? "

2 - "have better engine performance and save you $50-100 on gas before next oil change"
 

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Most all the leak I have seen been result of oil destroy cheap sourced RTV used at time of assembly, even worse when RTV crumble from poor maintain with oil change.. I have pulled bolts out that the aged RTV has never cured

This new stuff we using seem to be tougher when set up,, we try to have assembled before day is done, then leave sit till next morning before add oil and fire up

Something that I am confused on,,

1 - " have you applied grease at the gap between timing cover and engine? "

2 - "have better engine performance and save you $50-100 on gas before next oil change"
Yeah \....those statements are perplexing to say the least.
 

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@grcauto You think its something I can do at home? I got the impression it wasn't something I wanted to try to tackle. Two local shops (one where I am a customer, one where I was until I moved across town and it got ridiculous) both said that they could do it, but that it was really best left to the dealer. That kind of scared me off from tackling it myself.

Glad to know that I have some time though.
Have you done a timing chain before? How about a timing belt?
This job will be similar to most any dual overhead cam engine just an extra chain.
 

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Most all the leak I have seen been result of oil destroy cheap sourced RTV used at time of assembly, even worse when RTV crumble from poor maintain with oil change.. I have pulled bolts out that the aged RTV has never cured

This new stuff we using seem to be tougher when set up,, we try to have assembled before day is done, then leave sit till next morning before add oil and fire up

Something that I am confused on,,

1 - " have you applied grease at the gap between timing cover and engine? "

2 - "have better engine performance and save you $50-100 on gas before next oil change"

I mean the gap at the green circles below. When I switched from 5w30 to 0w20, combined MPG increased about 1.5 so I just gave a roughly estimate based on 5000 mile oil change
 

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Is changing timing cover gaskets a DIY project? Just the gaskets, not the chain or water pump.
Depends on your skill level. We hand these to a B level technician to do.
 

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It can be done with the engine in the vehicle? I have seen that the engine comes out to do the timing chains?
The valve cover gaskets have to be done at the same time, is that correct?
 

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It can be done with the engine in the vehicle? I have seen that the engine comes out to do the timing chains?
The valve cover gaskets have to be done at the same time, is that correct?
Does not need engine removal to do any of those things.
 
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