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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All, I'm new to this forum. I own a 2018 Hyundai Ioniq and have been active in that forum for a long time. We are considering purchasing a new 2018 Tucson and curious what you all think of your Tucson. I realize a lot of forum members are here seeking help with issues, so the average demographic on such a forum may not always be people loving their car at that moment. Perfect group to then get feedback from.

A few questions as a Tucson newbie:

1. What do you all think of your Tucson. Would you buy it again if you had a redo? Would you recommend this vehicle or suggest folks stay away due to issues? I realize that's a broad and open-ended question. Looking for the overall feel across a variety of owners. This question may have been asked many times on the forum though a tough one to search for.

2. What do you think of the DCT? I have a DCT on my Ioniq and it shifts well once going but can be a bit slow/sluggish getting started. Is the Tucson the same way? In 2018 trim levels, there is the option of the 2.4L Automatic or the 1.6L Turbo with DCT. What has been folks experience with these two choices?

3. Any other suggestions, things to look for, or general thoughts for a prospective Tucson buyer?

Thanks for your insights !
 

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I have a 2017 Tuscon Ultimate with 12000 miles, and I love it. I have no issues at all. I think the dct works great if you know what to expect and you take a little time to learn how to drive it optimally. The power is great, the overall feel and handling are great, and the gas mileage is awesome for what it is. I would definitely recommend it or buy another. Overall, a very satisfying choice, and a great value. I paid $27, 500 for my fully equipped Ultimate!
 

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Bought a 2017 SE AWD with the popular equipment package last year. Frankly I wish I did get a redo. Mostly bought it because most of the competition didn't have much incentives at the time so it was a good bit cheaper, and didn't like the performance of the DCT in city driving/stop and go traffic. Plus all the complaints of issues. Of course 2 months later Ford had a ton of incentives on the Escape and could have gotten an Escape SE AWD with the 2.0T for $2,000 more... Now they dropped the 2.0T as an option on the SE trim so probably doing to trade the Tucson in on a CPO 2017 Escape with the 2.0T. Better handling, smoother ride, interior is pretty nice, and a good bit more power than any of the Tucson drivetrains. Reliability ratings for new Escape turbo drivetrains are pretty good too.

My issues with the Tucson:

Not a fan of any of the drivetrains. The 2.0 is weak and fuel economy is pretty bad, don't like the DCT and the 1.6T still isn't all that powerful in a vehicle this size, and the 2.4 while better than the 2.0 is comparable to the competition's base engines with worse fuel economy.

The interior plastics are kind of cheap and both the plastics and soft touch material scratch and scuff very easily. At 8,000 miles my elbow has worn a quarter sized area of the soft touch armrest down to the white material underneath.

Liked the suspension when I bought it, by 5,000 miles the suspension had noticeably softened/loosened up. The rear has more roll than I'd like now and doesn't absorb bumps as well and is kind of noisy/klunky. I think something is wrong but the local dealer insists they can't find anything.

It's developed a few noises in the rear. The rear hatch makes tapping noises over bumps like many have complained about on here. Something under the rear bumper cover makes a loud banging/rattling noise when closing any of the doors.

The AC stopped getting cold after a few months. Had the sensor recall done recently and while it's much better now AC is still kind of weak. Heat isn't great either.


Personally I'd wait and take a look at the 2019 Tucson and RAV4, or the current Escape or CR-V.
 

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Hi All, I'm new to this forum. I own a 2018 Hyundai Ioniq and have been active in that forum for a long time. We are considering purchasing a new 2018 Tucson and curious what you all think of your Tucson. I realize a lot of forum members are here seeking help with issues, so the average demographic on such a forum may not always be people loving their car at that moment. Perfect group to then get feedback from.

A few questions as a Tucson newbie:

1. What do you all think of your Tucson. Would you buy it again if you had a redo? Would you recommend this vehicle or suggest folks stay away due to issues? I realize that's a broad and open-ended question. Looking for the overall feel across a variety of owners. This question may have been asked many times on the forum though a tough one to search for.

2. What do you think of the DCT? I have a DCT on my Ioniq and it shifts well once going but can be a bit slow/sluggish getting started. Is the Tucson the same way? In 2018 trim levels, there is the option of the 2.4L Automatic or the 1.6L Turbo with DCT. What has been folks experience with these two choices?

3. Any other suggestions, things to look for, or general thoughts for a prospective Tucson buyer?

Thanks for your insights !
I bought my 2017 Hyundai Tucson Night Edition, I don't buy 2019 expect waiting for Hyundai Tucson N version I might get that one.

I don't have issue with my DCT since I modification with delete resonator pipe for turbocharger then few weeks later I bought AEM charge pipe to help smooth roll from dead stop. It's up to you want have 2.4 Sport or last line Turbocharger for Tucson before 2019. My opinion turbocharger is better than have non-turbo because you can't beat turbo with better gas mileage.

My advice if you tired of manual in heavy traffic then maybe DCT not for you. 2.4 with 2019 then you will have range options.

Good luck!
 

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We have a 2016 Limited with over 36,000 miles. My wife loves her Tuscon, and yes she would buy it again if given the option. She doesn't mind the DCT and I have found the turbo allows me to accelerate into Houston traffic without any issues.

We had looked at the competition at the Houston Auto Show and this was one of her top picks. Except for basic maintenance, we have not experienced any issues.
 

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I bought a 2017 Tucson SE 2.0 w/ Popular Package in November. I have almost 3,000 miles on it. About to start putting 70 miles per day for work...

I wish I had gotten an upper level package. But I definitely didn't want a DCT and the dealer didn't have any upper level packages without it.

The base radio phone interface is barely OK. Things I don't like: 1. Can't switch between devices easily. 2. Can't control phone music/audiobooks via the steering wheel controls. Only volume and mute, NOT pause. 3. I miss my old JVC aftermarket single-DIN bought in 2011...

The engine/trans is what I expected except for the weird "excessive" engine braking. From 45mph and lower, it's like I'm lightly pressing on the brakes. It'll come to an almost stop (1-2mph). Really, no coasting at all. I've confirmed the brakes aren't dragging. Accel isn't bad, not great. I didn't buy this car to blast onto the freeway or to be constantly jumping into the left lane to pass people. It's OK going up hill.

Mileage is exactly what I expected. City driving is right at 27mpg, highway has been 31-32mph.

I wish the auto-headlight sensitivity could be adjusted like my old '94 ImpalaSS. They just come on later than I would like.

I do not like that the rear hatch does not pop open at all when unlocking it. I have never owned a vehicle were that did not happen. Not sedans or hatchbacks or sports/muscle cars. This just unlocks. I don't need it to lift up. But at least popping open would be nice.

The plastic body parts are already faded. Very surprising on that. 20 years of my '94 Impala SS sitting outside and the plastic still looked almost new. This plastic looks decades old from just 8 months and mild Ohio weather. Time for some 303 Aerospace...

Seating is comfortable. Ride is surprisingly good. Hopefully that doesn't change much.
 

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I love the tucson but the DCT isn't for everyone. If you're used to driving a manual car, you'll get along better with it. I have zero problems with it, but i've driven manuals for most of my life.

The 1.6L turbo engine is perfect. It produces full 195ft-lbs of torque at 1500rpm and feels like a much bigger V6 engine. It's actually fairly quick, much better than the natural aspirated competition, but obviously doesn't match the 2.0 turbo. I say it's perfect because it's fast, yet still returns great fuel economy. The 1.6T is for normal driving, that said, with low-moderate throttle the engine feels amazing, the low end torque makes the car very driveable around town. You don't need to rev it very high and it holds gears going up steep hills with no need rev high.

The ride quality is great. I drove all of the competition because I'm very particular about suspension. Much of the competition is very stiff and jarring over large bumps, but the Tucson has built in hydraulic bump stops, it handles the large bumps great without being jarring. Yet it still handles fairly flat and honestly I think if you want something that handles better than the tucson, you should just get an actual sports car.

So far it's been the quietest car i've owned. I even had several people remark about how quiet it is without me saying anything about it.
 

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I’ve owned three, a 2016, 2017 and now a new 2018 Limited.

Having owned the prior Tucsons. The 1.6T and DCT is the way to go, I traded in a 2017 Genesis G80 as its low front clearance resulted in $1,000 damage.

I didn’t want to spend the money with little return and just took it out on the trade.

Personally I wouldn’t give a dime for the pano roof. I also deleted the cargo cover but it already had the mud guards installed. Unfortunately to get all the goodies it is necessary to get the pano roof as part of the package, but oddly enough the steering wheel is heated while the Genesis was not. Go figure. It doesn’t have cooled seats, however which may be a desirable feature.

Having driven and owned both the turbo and the 2.0 it is a no brainer. Get the Turbo. And don’t worry about the DCT transmission.

However if this is a concern wait for the 2019 model with the 2.4 and conventional transmission.
 

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25,000 miles on my 2016 with the turbo and DCT. I love the car. It is sporty and practical. No problems to speak of. I only wish I had a heated steering wheel and front seat position memory. The plastics on mine are holding up well. I have to wonder if they cheapened up the plastics on the 17 and 18.

I think the turbo is the way to go. I love the power and would not want the smaller engine.
If I could go back and do it again I definately would.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the replies folks. You are confirming what I was suspecting. If we go with a 2018 it will definitely be the Value trim 1.6T with DCT. As rmissourimule said, I don't care about the sunroof, but the powertrain has so much more punch than the 2.0 and a couple other features would be good to have such as the power lift-gate and rear sensors. We may hold off for the 2019 update. Some will be dependent on when we sell our Chevy Equinox.

As for DCT, there is all sorts of FUD out there about DCT's. I've read plenty of it on this forum. I drive a Hyundai Ioniq with DCT and have no issue with it. I drove a manual most of my life so that is a non-issue. But in reality, once off the line I just ignore the transmission as it shifts fine. The one place I have issue with it in my Ioniq is when climbing steep highways at speed as we have out west. Then I just toss it into Sport mode and manually control the gear so it does not bounce back and forth. In the Ioniq, that is one use model they did not program well. I see plenty of failure horror stories on the DCT and slushbox automatic transmissions. It happens on both.

Thanks again for all the thoughts. Anyone else is also welcome to continue the comments both positive or negative.
 

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If you plan on waiting for 2019 then you wont be able to get the 1.6T with the DCT. You will have to get the 2.4 with a regular transmission.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If you plan on waiting for 2019 then you wont be able to get the 1.6T with the DCT. You will have to get the 2.4 with a regular transmission.
Understood. I drove a 2.0 Tucson and was underwhelmed with the performance. A dealer in Denver has a few of the 2018's with the 2.4 L so when I'm next in that area I'm going to drive one to see what I think of that powertrain. It will help in the tradeoff decision between the 2018 1.6T powertrain vs the 2019 safety features and updated interior styling.

The 2018's are already being pretty heavily discounted here. I'm wondering if the 2019's will carry that discount or will they push the MSRP because of the new styling. For my 2018 Ioniq, they stayed with the discounting from day one of the new model year, though it was basically the same as the 2017 with the addition of one key feature (LKAS). I bought one of the first cars to arrive in Colorado (happened to be in the color combo I wanted so went after it) at a sharp discount with good negotiation.

I have not found the 2019 pricing, trim packages online yet. I presume we'll see the trim packages and pricing mid to late summer and the 18's may go on even steeper discount to move them out. No way to know what they'll do with incentives when they first come out.
 

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Understood. I drove a 2.0 Tucson and was underwhelmed with the performance. A dealer in Denver has a few of the 2018's with the 2.4 L so when I'm next in that area I'm going to drive one to see what I think of that powertrain. It will help in the tradeoff decision between the 2018 1.6T powertrain vs the 2019 safety features and updated interior styling.

The 2018's are already being pretty heavily discounted here. I'm wondering if the 2019's will carry that discount or will they push the MSRP because of the new styling. For my 2018 Ioniq, they stayed with the discounting from day one of the new model year, though it was basically the same as the 2017 with the addition of one key feature (LKAS). I bought one of the first cars to arrive in Colorado (happened to be in the color combo I wanted so went after it) at a sharp discount with good negotiation.

I have not found the 2019 pricing, trim packages online yet. I presume we'll see the trim packages and pricing mid to late summer and the 18's may go on even steeper discount to move them out. No way to know what they'll do with incentives when they first come out.
My persona opinion is that I would drive th “basic” Limited as well as the Value Pak” version. I haven’t checked the brochure recently but does the Value edition have the leather, the passenger power seat, and the Navigation?

I regard those as rather important.

I have driven the Sport 2.4 and it is a quantum leap over the 2.0.

The upside of the 2.4 is that with the conventional transmission you will never have to be concerned with the power train.

I have the 1.6T and the DCT and enjoy it much more than the 2.0. But the 2.4 will scoot as well. Thinking that the fuel economy will be comparable. The 2.0 is actually pretty lousy to be brutally honest at about 22.5. In my 2016 Tucson Ulitimate it was about 25 mpg overall. But I didn’t want the pano roof. So I passed on the Ultimate this time. However the basic Limited removes the rear parking sensors!

The Ultimate package gives you the pano roof and ventilated seats. And most importantly the auto emergency braking with pedestrian detection.

The exterior on the 2019 is subtle although the grill has been redone. Some of the safety features are now standard.

I got about $4,750 in total rebates and a fair price for my G80, so I pulled the trigger.
 

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My daughter has a 2016 with the 2.0 and she is very happy with it. It has enough power. It will not win any races, but that's not how she drives anyway. She drives about 500 miles a week, much of it in a strictly-enforced 45-mph zone, and consistently gets 32 mpg.

Sounds like you are after a higher level of options than what she has--she has the small radio display, rear camera but no nav or leather, just the basic SE with a few options.
 

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Thanks for all the replies folks. You are confirming what I was suspecting. If we go with a 2018 it will definitely be the Value trim 1.6T with DCT. As rmissourimule said, I don't care about the sunroof, but the powertrain has so much more punch than the 2.0 and a couple other features would be good to have such as the power lift-gate and rear sensors. We may hold off for the 2019 update. Some will be dependent on when we sell our Chevy Equinox.

As for DCT, there is all sorts of FUD out there about DCT's. I've read plenty of it on this forum. I drive a Hyundai Ioniq with DCT and have no issue with it. I drove a manual most of my life so that is a non-issue. But in reality, once off the line I just ignore the transmission as it shifts fine. The one place I have issue with it in my Ioniq is when climbing steep highways at speed as we have out west. Then I just toss it into Sport mode and manually control the gear so it does not bounce back and forth. In the Ioniq, that is one use model they did not program well. I see plenty of failure horror stories on the DCT and slushbox automatic transmissions. It happens on both.

Thanks again for all the thoughts. Anyone else is also welcome to continue the comments both positive or negative.
Climbing mountains with the 1.6T is one thing where the turbo shines as opposed to the naturally aspirated models. Full 195ft-lbs of torque is available at 1500rpm, the car holds gears very well without the need to shift. My 1.6T doesn't hunt gears or anything like that going up steep grades. It only downshifts when I press the throttle further to accelerate up a hill, to pass someone. Also, if you're at high altitude, the turbo won't lose power unlike a naturally aspirated engine which loses about 3% power for every 1000ft of elevation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Climbing mountains with the 1.6T is one thing where the turbo shines as opposed to the naturally aspirated models. Full 195ft-lbs of torque is available at 1500rpm, the car holds gears very well without the need to shift. My 1.6T doesn't hunt gears or anything like that going up steep grades. It only downshifts when I press the throttle further to accelerate up a hill, to pass someone. Also, if you're at high altitude, the turbo won't lose power unlike a naturally aspirated engine which loses about 3% power for every 1000ft of elevation.
Agreed. I had a turbo in a previous vehicle and they are fantastic for our high altitude climbs. That's one of the use models a turbo is designed for.
 

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My in laws live up a mountain pass from us and our Tucson's own that pass. So much better than any car I've had before except for maybe the 2008 MDX we had for a while. The power is just there when you need it.
 

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The engine/trans is what I expected except for the weird "excessive" engine braking. From 45mph and lower, it's like I'm lightly pressing on the brakes. It'll come to an almost stop (1-2mph). Really, no coasting at all. I've confirmed the brakes aren't dragging. Accel isn't bad, not great. I didn't buy this car to blast onto the freeway or to be constantly jumping into the left lane to pass people. It's OK going up hill.

Mileage is exactly what I expected. City driving is right at 27mpg, highway has been 31-32mph.

I wish the auto-headlight sensitivity could be adjusted like my old '94 ImpalaSS. They just come on later than I would like.

I do not like that the rear hatch does not pop open at all when unlocking it. I have never owned a vehicle were that did not happen. Not sedans or hatchbacks or sports/muscle cars. This just unlocks. I don't need it to lift up. But at least popping open would be nice.

The plastic body parts are already faded. Very surprising on that. 20 years of my '94 Impala SS sitting outside and the plastic still looked almost new. This plastic looks decades old from just 8 months and mild Ohio weather. Time for some 303 Aerospace...

Seating is comfortable. Ride is surprisingly good. Hopefully that doesn't change much.
I get a bit of engine braking/drag when coasting in normal mode, but not more than most vehicles. In Sport mode on the other hand it's quite noticeable. Feels jerky, like something is dragging then releases for a second then starts dragging again.

Powerwise it gets the job done with just me in the vehicle, though acceleration uphill is still pretty slow. With myself and 2 other adults in the vehicle it's pretty bad. Trying to accelerate even slightly uphill with 3 adults inside is just plain embarrassing. Will barely go above 4,000 RPM, too much strain on the engine I guess.

Best gas mileage I've gotten is 25MPG highway. Around town usually 20MPG. Even during the first 500 miles when I was real easy on the gas pedal I was getting 21-22MPG in town at best.

I don't know of any crossover/SUV with a rear hatch that pops open without automatic opening.
 

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I get a bit of engine braking/drag when coasting in normal mode, but not more than most vehicles. In Sport mode on the other hand it's quite noticeable. Feels jerky, like something is dragging then releases for a second then starts dragging again.

Powerwise it gets the job done with just me in the vehicle, though acceleration uphill is still pretty slow. With myself and 2 other adults in the vehicle it's pretty bad. Trying to accelerate even slightly uphill with 3 adults inside is just plain embarrassing. Will barely go above 4,000 RPM, too much strain on the engine I guess.

Best gas mileage I've gotten is 25MPG highway. Around town usually 20MPG. Even during the first 500 miles when I was real easy on the gas pedal I was getting 21-22MPG in town at best.

I don't know of any crossover/SUV with a rear hatch that pops open without automatic opening.
I think what you consider slow and fast may not correlate to what most people would consider slow and fast. I have a long commute, so I'm used to economy cars. The Tucson 1.6T is actually quick, not a sports car, but great for an economy car. If I want to go fast, I have a Suzuki GSXR 600 for some serious speed.

This is a 175hp engine no matter how you look at it. So it'll accelerate the same as most other 175hp CUV's, which puts it in the same ballpark as the CX5, the Rav4, Forester etc in terms of acceleration. But it was not designed to be a sporty high revving engine, it was designed for low end torque and mid range power, which makes it far more driveable. It's essentially an engine designed to offer the horsepower of the larger naturally aspirated competition, but give much more low end torque. This is great for going up hills, but won't allow it accelerate any faster. It only means that it doesn't have to rev really high to do it. Most people are annoyed by high revving engines droning up hills.

I'm not sure why you're getting such low mpg, perhaps your commute to work isn't very far so the engine isn't properly warmed up. The 1.6T engine does take alot of time to warm up. My commute is over an hour long, and I'm averaging 27-29mpg just driving normal(40% rural roads/60% highway). On all highway trips it's over 30mpg, all hand calculated not relying on the display.

If you really want better acceleration, the Honda CRV now offers a 1.5T which has a little more 190hp. If you want alot more acceleration, you should just get the 2.0T engine offered in the sportage or other cars.
 
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