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Discussion Starter #1
Need help from any perf gurus out there...

I have a 2003 Elantra GT (Canadian Model) 2.0L engine, standard tgranny...and I have to say the performance stinks. It's always felt slow (compared to out old 1998 elantra) since we bought the car and it's only become more blatant since we bought a little 2005 Accent 5 (1.6L) and this car accellerates far better.

What is the exact problem? Everything feels delayed....when we step on the gas in especially at lower rpms it does not hesitate, but it just kind of sloooooooooooooowly begins to build steam and then finally gets moving when it reaches the higher rpms. So I have to drive this car in a lower gear constantly to keep it flow just being plain ol slow. I always attributed it to the car having too high gearing but now I wonder if it's just really poor fuel delivery.

It does not feel like the fuel sensors / stumbling of the old Elantra Models.

The air filters are clean etc, this problem does not change with fuel octane etc.

Like I mentioned our Accent feels much faster, the engine actually pulls the car easily in vistually any rpm.

Any thoughts? It would be really nice if this 2.0L engine behaved like one.

Thanks
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I will put my money on it being either an input speed sensor, or an output speed sensor, causing it to drop into limp home mode, meaning it sticks into third gear, giving you absolutely shithouse acceleration and fuel mileage!

Take it to your dealer and have a code check carried out on your transmission and Engine!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Originally posted by duke@Nov 9 2004, 12:28 PM
it's a 5-speed;

have you taken the car to a Hyundai dealer ???? If so, which one ?????
[snapback]2508[/snapback]​


Yep it's a stick so tranny is not the issue.

Not taken it in yet, i bought it at West Ottawa Hyundai....but I think I will now...

...like I said my old elantra felt fast enough, it pulled through the low rpms no problem. It really liked a good flogging. My GT is a total nancy

I guess I'll go to the dealer and compare.... so who has driven a old elantra and one of the the newer ones? Thoughts?

TIA
 

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Sounds like something is definitely wrong. My '02 Elantra 4-door automatic is darn fast for a four-cylinder - not much on the low end but when you need to go from 80k to 110 it gets up there pretty quick. I've driven a few Accents and they have nowhere near the same top end.
 

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Originally posted by zazzle_swagneer@Nov 9 2004, 11:30 AM
Need help from any perf gurus out there...

I have a 2003 Elantra GT (Canadian Model) 2.0L engine, standard tgranny...and I have to say the performance stinks. It's always felt slow (compared to out old 1998 elantra) since we bought the car and it's only become more blatant since we bought a little 2005 Accent 5 (1.6L) and this car accellerates far better.

What is the exact problem? Everything feels delayed....when we step on the gas in especially at lower rpms  it does not hesitate, but it just kind of sloooooooooooooowly begins to build steam and then finally gets moving when it reaches the higher rpms. So I have to drive this car in a lower gear constantly to keep it  flow just being plain ol slow.  I always attributed it to the car having too high gearing but now I wonder if it's just really poor fuel delivery.

It does not feel like the fuel sensors / stumbling of the old Elantra Models.

The air filters are clean etc, this problem does not change with fuel octane etc.

Like I mentioned our Accent feels much faster, the engine actually pulls the car easily in vistually any rpm.

Any thoughts? It would be really nice if this 2.0L engine behaved like one.

Thanks
[email protected]
[snapback]2486[/snapback]​


Hi!......before having your car checked for faults by a Hyundai Dealership, you might like to try an ECU re-set.

Full details can be found in an article I wrote here :-
My Webpage

Please let us know how you get on!.
Cheers,
Nick. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
sorry... dumb question - earth lead ... this this the negative connection?

sounds like a great tip! thanks


Originally posted by VALKYRIE YB70@Nov 10 2004, 02:11 AM
Hi!......before having your car checked for faults by a Hyundai Dealership, you might like to try an ECU re-set.

Full details can be found in an article I wrote here :-
My Webpage

Please let us know how you get on!.
Cheers,
Nick. :)
[snapback]2533[/snapback]​
 

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Hey Duke, what do you reckon.
Could this be put down to another possible "bog don on take off" situation, being caused by something like a "faulty MAP sensor?"

This would explain alot of the problem, remembering that we are trying to diagnose over the screen.
The possibility of MAP sensor slipped my mind before.
 

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Originally posted by Dr. Hundi@Nov 10 2004, 05:13 AM
Hey Duke, what do you reckon.
Could this be put down to another possible "bog don on take off" situation, being caused by something like a "faulty MAP sensor?"

This would explain alot of the problem, remembering that we are trying to diagnose over the screen.
The possibility of MAP sensor slipped my mind before.
[snapback]2542[/snapback]​



Possibly, you may have nailed this one, may be fouled up only. I personally don't like the MAP, I prefer the MAF, they are more precise in measuring. That most likely is the reason for the return of the MAF in 04 with CVVT.
 

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Hi Duke - can you explain the difference between MAF and MAP? - I know that they stand for but haven't a clue what they do.
 

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Originally posted by zazzle_swagneer@Nov 10 2004, 12:15 PM
sorry... dumb question - earth lead ... this this the negative connection? 

sounds like a great tip! thanks
[snapback]2541[/snapback]​


Yup, earth=ground=negative.

When you`re doing the Shuey impression, it`s really frustrating if you run into traffic........so the early Sunday morning tip`s a good `un!.

Have fun!
Nick. :)
 

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MAP Sensor - Manifold Absolute Pressure sensor.

This component measures the amount of negative pressure or vacuum, which is basically any pressure below atmospheric pressure.
There is a diaphram within the MAP sensor which controls return voltage back to your ECU. I could tell you exactly how it works, but I will be here forever.

Each of your sensors are fed a 5V supply voltage, basically the return voltage will be sent to the ECU to determine the maifold pressure, which is then reverted to a barometric pressure reading.

Note: your Intake air temp is actually inside your MAP sensor! :eek:

MAF sensor - Mass Airflow Sensor.

This component also measures air but in a different manner, the air is measured in mass.
Within the MAF sensor, there is a hotwire, which is basically the same as a light globe fillament.
The sensor is fed a total of 5V which has a given circuit resistance.
The circuit resistance is high when the hotwire is hot and low when the hotwire is cool.
The hotwire is placed in the direct path of airflow, meaning that if the hotwire is hot and the circuit resistance is high, then the ECU reads this as there is a low airspeed through the inlet.
Therefore, if the hotwire is at it's maximum resistance, then the throttle must be closed.
If the hotwire is at it's lowest amount of resistance, then the throttle is wide open.

Remebering that the factor to which the air is measured, is it's density and speed.

Hope this helped you understand Gordo. :)
 

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Thanks Dr Hundi – that’s an excellent explanation. I understand transducers and rheostats so I can more or less grasp how the signal would get from the sensor to the ECU.

From the description then, I would think that the MAF system could be a bit more prone to failure as you have a very fine filament constantly exposed to the wind inside the air intake, which may be why the change to MAP for a while. At the same time it seems this system would be able to produce finer gradations of output than the MAP sensor would.
 

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I just believe that AirFlow meters ares quite simply pains in the arse.
They appear to much more prone to failure, costa an arm and a leg when in need of replacement.
They also create havok with performance tuners, where the owner wants a fully sick blow off valve. Which just ain't gonna happen!
Map sensors are also great for diagnosis work, if they are in correct working order, they can lead you to vacuum leaks and the like!

Vote MAP sensor - 1
Vote MAF sensor - 0
 
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