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Discussion Starter #1
everyone i ask has different answers some say 2 mins 5 min others say i dont need much time if its realy cold out i waite 2-3 minutes before heading off.i feel like im wasting uneccessary gas by doing it this way?
 

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With the thinner oils in Newer cars they really don't need more than about a minute or 2 in cold temps. Trans/clutch fluids warm up quicker as the car moves anyway. Idling any longer than that and you're just warming the car up for your comfort. And that's OK to admit.
 

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depends on how cold temp is. but generally a minute maybe 2 if its really cold i will drive off slowly coast to the end of the street in neatral usually by then its 2 minutes you want to drive it easy give the oil a chance to warm up and move freelly & parts of the engine to expand with heat. worse thing i seen is someone started there engine and full throttled it thats how you can break something.
 

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thats how you can break something.
break' something ? hasn't happen to mine yet. i think it can put more wear on parts how much wear i dunno.? but yes i do agree with fediej post thinner oil does help alot too. im guessing 2mins for warm up time should be enough.
 

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Yes its possible... when your engine parts or even transmission are really cold im talking - sub zero temps your internal engine/transmission parts contract and become brittle to where if there forced hard enough by hammering on the gas to where they have not had enough time to
expand then yes its very possible to break something like a piston conecting rod or something

else if you look at aviation planes & commercial airlines they all warm there engines and equipment for this very reason. 2 minutes is fine as long as you drive away slowly and give your vehicle time to warm up. i will also add that i dont beleive 30 seconds is enough time for warm up as stated in owners manual.
 

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If it's above freezing I give it about 15 seconds before driving off - gently.
Below freezing 30 seconds to maybe 2 minutes, when the fast idle starts to drop off.

Way back when I started my 1981 Accord in -20F weather.
I let it warm up a couple minutes, but when I drove off it developed a miss, which didn't go away.
About a week later I tracked it down to broken ring lands on a piston (still have as a keepsake.)
It had 180k miles, so it wasn't too shocking.

I have a neighbor who had a 1990 Accord.
Every weekday morning he'd start it up and immediately take off like a scared rabbit, winter or summer.
After a few years he'd leave a trail of blue smoke.
Now he's retired with a BMW, and he babies that thing.
 

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Circuitsmith Yup on older less effecient engines warm up time was needed especially if it was a carbureted engine. i remember my dad always warming up his 1977 Pontiac because if he didnt do so. it would of stalled. it had a 2 barrel rochester carburetor that needed to be warmed up 1st once the carb was warmed up then you could drive off. today we have Fuel Injection that does

away with that. on modern vehicles of today but they all still need some warm up time Just not as much as the pre 1970-1980's era vehicles. the internall moving parts of an engine that have various alloys & metalergy in an engine still need heat to expand because if they dont it might break apart. ever heard of thermal cracking? found this interesting article on the titanic to read.

 

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If the old carburated engines were adjusted correctly and the manifold risers were in good order they ran just fine cold to hot.
 

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If the old carburated engines were adjusted correctly and the manifold risers were in good order they ran just fine cold to hot.
:coffee:That's very true, I sorta miss the 70's Cars am i alone for posting this? i mean wernt they something else grcauto ? they wernt even close to being equiped with all this computerized electronics like we have in today's vehicles. i still remember learning to drive off the old man's 1977 Pontiac Ventura sedan basic 6 cylinder engine rear wheel drive 4 speed automatic no stereo, no A/C no heated seats or any creature comforts like i have in my vehicles of today AND how? people got around in rear wheel drive cars in winter was beyond me.? & sometimes funny because you would see them inc

myself spin the wheels and spin some more until a nabour or someone would come along & help give you a push. and thats how it was back then. and people worked on there cars engine and repaired body work like rust i use to see all this. but nowadays you dont see it that much anymore vehicles were simpler back then. & i think weve taken simple and turned it into complicated to where no one anymore whants to or can fix them up anymore with-out truck loads of money unlike before you could slowly fix up an old car at your pace & tincker around with them you dont see that anymore its Lost...
 

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I let my car warm up on the way.... I don't romp out of the driveway and up to the xpressway... Unless you live on the on ramp, let the car warm up driving gently for the 2-5 minute trip to the highway...
 

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During winter i normally start, wait about a minute or so idling then drive gingerly away... keep revs below 3k until temps have warmed up enough to reached lowest rung on the temp gauge. That is what i do.
 
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