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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Curious to hear how long your Accent's take to warm up. Mine takes a very very long time. I took it into the dealership thinking it had a stuck thermostat.

They assured me that it was normal. Before I went toe to toe with them I figured I would get some input here.

They first told me that they started it cold. The paperwork says the startup temperature was 114 degrees, fairly warm. So they never let it cool down to start. After 4 minutes engine temperature was 130 degrees, after 12 minutes temperature was 151 degrees. So 12 minutes of idle gave it roughly 40 degrees? I'm thinking the thermostat isn't closing all the way. It will eventually get warm on the interstate. I ended up taking with the service manager, he said that because there was no code, there was no problem. I think because it will eventually get warm there would be no code. This thing takes longer than my V-8 Ford to warm up.



EDIT: It was about 25 degrees Fahrenheit when they ran the test.
 

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Thermostat failure would result in the temperature gauge reading WELL BELOW the middle mark OR overheating!!!


This car is small and will dissipate heat quicker than say a chevy impala and the same is true for warming up. Driving at highway speeds definitely helps bring the temp gauge at the middle mark.

Now, you live in Utah, so it probably snows over there and, therefore, you may need to get an electric engine warmer when starting the car in the morning or after long periods of time.
 

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Curious to hear how long your Accent's take to warm up. Mine takes a very very long time.
On colder days, my 1988 Ford Festiva takes almost to the next town to warm up(highway) from the closed garage. Our 2008 Accent, 2007 Caliber, & new 2013 Elantra warm quickly(2-3 miles-highway), from our closed garage. I liked electric dip sticks if you wanted to avoid a block heater.
 

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It was 28 deg F this morning when I left the house (probably 40-45 in the garage). The temperature display on the dash moved from 1 bar to 4 bars in 1 mile (approx 4 minutes), with the heater off. I normally do not turn on the heater until the display shows 3-4 bars.
 

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These newer engines are much more efficient than the older ones. When I bought my SantaFe new I could not believe how long it took to warm up compared to my older vehicles.

Remember, engine heat up requires gas consumption
 

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It was only 30 below zero F here this morning :) (That's -35C)

I live in the country and the speed limit on the road in front of my place is 60 MPH so whenever I go anywhere, the motor is revving at highway speeds.. It takes me about 5 minutes before I start feeling any heat at all from the registers and after about 10 minutes, the gauge is where it normally sits. (I'm glad the Canadian GLS comes with heated seats) :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thermostat failure would result in the temperature gauge reading WELL BELOW the middle mark OR overheating!!!


This car is small and will dissipate heat quicker than say a chevy impala and the same is true for warming up. Driving at highway speeds definitely helps bring the temp gauge at the middle mark.

Now, you live in Utah, so it probably snows over there and, therefore, you may need to get an electric engine warmer when starting the car in the morning or after long periods of time.


Not necessarily. They generally don't fail sitting wide open or totally closed. It is very common for thermostats to get rust inside them keeping them from closing fully. That would let the car eventually warm up. My BMW would take a very long time to warm up, but eventually get to the normal operating temperature. I replaced the thermostat and it warmed up quickly.

It isn't so cold to need a block heater. It rarely drops below zero.

It was 28 deg F this morning when I left the house (probably 40-45 in the garage). The temperature display on the dash moved from 1 bar to 4 bars in 1 mile (approx 4 minutes), with the heater off. I normally do not turn on the heater until the display shows 3-4 bars.
That is what I would expect. I have a 2 mile drive to the interstate, and I usually reach 4 bars of heat about 3 miles down the interstate.
 

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This gets near something I've wanted to ask about. As usual, my post is sort of off-topic (apologies).
If it's true that most engine wear happens at start up, and the wear is due to the fact that any oil is too viscous to flow correctly when it's at ambient outdoor temperature, then why don't we all have 1) a heater in the oil sump to heat the oil up in preparation for start, and 2) an auxiliary electric pump to begin circulating it through the engine prior to ignition?
Dumb question I'm sure, but I felt compelled to ask.
 

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There is something definitely wrong! Probably the thermostat. I had an issue just like this on my previous new 2010 Tucson GLS AWD. My vehicle would take forever to reach operating temp. (a real pain in the winter! :rolleyes:) After much nagging to the dealer service, & 2 attempts, they finally replaced the thermostat, & that fixed it!
 

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The un-asked question.. when you fire up from cold start, do you have the HVAC fan running and temp set to high heat ??

What you may need to do is run fan slow during warm up, so as to not keep the cold constant circulating water through heat core from staying cold and holding back engine ability to get hot water faster.. Switch to inside air (same principle as an oven), let the warming up of inside air allow water to get hot, then trade from inside to outside air after engine get to temp.. then you can increase fan speed to now that we have hot water.
 

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that's a good point sbr. if my old accent has heat on sitting idle it won't warm up worth a crap until i get it moving on the highway with higher RPMs.

i'd say this is pretty normal considering the size and efficiency of the engine (again more heat converted into mechanical energy rather than waste heat that warms it up as mentioned already). i'd take a closer look at the fuel economy you're getting rather than time to warm up. if this is a big problem for you, then get a block heater installed. in fact, if you're worried about your fuel economy this is a very good move. stick that on a timer so it warmed about 2 hours before you drive and you will notice a bit of a boost in your fuel economy - and your warm up time will be almost nothing. speaking from experience :)
 

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Maybe you didn't put much weight in my first post here, But, as I said, I had this problem. Not when the Tuc was new, all was fine then, it got hot faster then any car I ever had (probably because it is a PZEV vehicle) they have programming, and a different cat converter (expensive) to get them up to temp as soon as possible for lowest emissions.

It was about 6 month's later that the problem developed, and I had a hard time convincing hyundai at the time, but finally a "sharp" young mechanic fixed it.

My 2011 Sportage (Tucson clone) heats up quick just fine, like my Tucson originally did.
 

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I have an SE with manual trans.

One of the fuel saving techniques Hyundai uses is to lean out the mixture when going downhill, while in gear as long as you don't touch the brake or clutch. I have seen the data using Torque Pro. I'm not sure if this is done with the automatic trans.

I have left my house with 4 bars, driven downhill, and ended with only one bar (winter). Conservation of fuel means no extra heat.

With the clutch switch mod the engine will warm up faster going downhill. It will also help keep your speed from increasing a little, but it will consume more fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The un-asked question.. when you fire up from cold start, do you have the HVAC fan running and temp set to high heat ??

What you may need to do is run fan slow during warm up, so as to not keep the cold constant circulating water through heat core from staying cold and holding back engine ability to get hot water faster.. Switch to inside air (same principle as an oven), let the warming up of inside air allow water to get hot, then trade from inside to outside air after engine get to temp.. then you can increase fan speed to now that we have hot water.
I don't turn the fan on until it is warm. I understand the theory of your question, but I can't be sold that the very few CFM blowing through the small heater core is going to be enough to seriously slow down engine warm up time.

I realize that these are small cars, with efficient engines, but this just seems way off to me.

I seem to be getting several experiences on both sides. I may just have to rip out the thermostat and test it in a pot of hot water. If it fails like I think it will, that service manager is going to get an ear full.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have an SE with manual trans.

One of the fuel saving techniques Hyundai uses is to lean out the mixture when going downhill, while in gear as long as you don't touch the brake or clutch. I have seen the data using Torque Pro. I'm not sure if this is done with the automatic trans.

I have left my house with 4 bars, driven downhill, and ended with only one bar (winter). Conservation of fuel means no extra heat.

With the clutch switch mod the engine will warm up faster going downhill. It will also help keep your speed from increasing a little, but it will consume more fuel.
I'm a manual trans as well, but no downhill in my commute. Utah is pretty flat overall. That is interesting to know, thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This gets near something I've wanted to ask about. As usual, my post is sort of off-topic (apologies).
If it's true that most engine wear happens at start up, and the wear is due to the fact that any oil is too viscous to flow correctly when it's at ambient outdoor temperature, then why don't we all have 1) a heater in the oil sump to heat the oil up in preparation for start, and 2) an auxiliary electric pump to begin circulating it through the engine prior to ignition?
Dumb question I'm sure, but I felt compelled to ask.
Its a good question, not a dumb one. Modern oils are pretty good, even at lower temperature. A small amount of oil sticks to all engine parts, so it still has some oil before startup. Viscosity is basically how thick or thin oil is. You already know that it is thicker when cold than hot.

Startup just isn't that hard on an engine. If you think about it, almost any properly maintained engine will last 200,000+ miles. Really it wouldn't do much good for them to last much longer. Suspension, transmissions, axles, and bearings are pretty worn in most cases. It isn't uncommon for a freak car to last forever without breaking down, Honda has a website with high mileage cars, and some of them are approaching 1,000,000 miles. Generally it gets more expensive to keep a car going past the point of ~200k, even if the engine runs great.
 

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You should get an Ultra-gauge and then you can see the engine coolant temp as well as other sensors in real time. They are definitely a nice OBDII reader.

Last night on my 2008 Accent, that had been sitting outside for 2 days in cold temps, I took off for town. The outside temp was 9F and the drive is all rural. The temp starts climbing immediately and within 3 miles was up to 150F.

But it took almost 10 miles to get to the point where the t-stat started to open at 180F. I stayed in 4th gear at about 40 mph and did keep the fan speed on low until 170F, then cranked it up. Still you could see the temp drop when the rpms went down. Once I got to town though it was no problem staying at 183F where it usually runs.

I don't let it sit and idle long before I start moving, less than a minute. Unless you are putting a load on the engine it takes forever to get to fully warm. I also use 0w20 Mobil 1 oil.
 

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Your temp gauge is the clue. It was evident on my Tucson. When new, it would warm up very quick to 1 click under 1/2 way. After maybe 6 month's it started taking a long time getting there, if it went there atall depending on the weather, and, or, the ambient temp. outside. As the weather got colder, I was getting less, & less heat, and less gas mileage. I was told by Hyundai it was normal, but, I replied, it wasn't that way when new! Finally, on my 3rd attempt, being a good service dept. & dealer, they took my word for it, and fixed it! It took quite awhile for the mechanic, it must have been in a tough spot from what I observed, but yes, everything was finally back to normal. :)
 

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Funny that you should ask the question of warm up times, I've been wondering the exact same thing this past few weeks. On my '12 L hatch with MT, it generally takes a good 10 minutes before the heaters are even blowing tolerable warm air. Granted, I've been at home this past week and haven't taken the car out much; the other morening when it was -40 I had some issues starting (the car wasn't plugged in either), but it was all good after I jiggled the key. Must've been a frozen starter. I let the heater run and came back after about 10 minutes and it wasn't bad, but the car was still really cold and holding the steering wheel and shift knob was not a fun experience without gloves.

Anyways, I'm assuming that long warm up times like this are to be expected when it's so cold out and the car's sitting outside 24/7, just let the engine run for a bit and it should all be good.
 

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If it's true that most engine wear happens at start up, and the wear is due to the fact that any oil is too viscous to flow correctly when it's at ambient outdoor temperature, then why don't we all have 1) a heater in the oil sump to heat the oil up in preparation for start, and 2) an auxiliary electric pump to begin circulating it through the engine prior to ignition?
One fellow worked on that problem about 15-20 years(?) ago. Never heard about it after that. One inexpensive & simple help that I mentioned a number of posts above yours, was an electric dip stick to keep oil warm through the night.
 
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