Hyundai Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A few months back I posted in this forum about my 2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport DCT and that the clutch is not replaceable. See link below for old thread:

https://www.hyundai-forums.com/ad-2017-elantra/630537-hyundai-elantra-7-sp-dct-life-expectancy.html

**NOTE: I understand the clutch of the DCT is covered by the 10YR/100,000M warranty, but I put a lot of miles on my car and may get to 100,000 miles within 4-5 years.**

I reached out to Hyundai USA, who told me to speak with the dealer. I spoke with two Hyundai dealers (Alexandra and Fairfax Hyundai in VA), both said if the clutch wears/breaks they replace the entire transmission because the clutch is considered an internal part and Hyundai tells them to do so. I'm okay with replacing a clutch because it's a wear part and needs to be replaced every so often.

I couldn't believe how ridiculous it is that you can't just replace the clutch. I reached out to Consumer Reports to see if they would still recommend any Hyundai with a DCT because I'm being told the DCT is not replaceable. They took my question on their weekly car show, "Talking Cars."

https://youtu.be/zY35E5_mVZE?t=14m4s

Consumer Reports reached out to Hyundai about whether the DCT clutch is replaceable. Hyundai replied saying the clutch is an available part ($750) and replaceable. It was also noted on the show that the transmission does not need to be dropped in order to replace the DCT clutch. However, the two dealerships I spoke to said Hyundai tells the dealers to replace the entire transmission if the DCT clutch fails.

There seems to be disconnect between what Hyundai is telling Consumer Reports and the dealers. I guess you can bring the car to a 3rd party when the warranty expires, but finding someone who is truly knowledgeable about DCT's is hard.

I'm still on the fence on whether I should offload this car after a few years/ around when the warranty expires or just keep it? The transmission replacement for the DCT Elantra is $6,000 (possibly more because of labor)

What do you guys think about this situation?

Can anyone find this part? I looked everywhere online, for the life of me I can't find the clutch pack for the Elantra DCT.
 

·
Registered
2020 Santa Fe SEL Plus
Joined
·
2,238 Posts
A few months back I posted in this forum about my 2017 Hyundai Elantra Sport DCT and that the clutch is not replaceable. See link below for old thread:

https://www.hyundai-forums.com/ad-2017-elantra/630537-hyundai-elantra-7-sp-dct-life-expectancy.html

**NOTE: I understand the clutch of the DCT is covered by the 10YR/100,000M warranty, but I put a lot of miles on my car and may get to 100,000 miles within 4-5 years.**

I reached out to Hyundai USA, who told me to speak with the dealer. I spoke with two Hyundai dealers (Alexandra and Fairfax Hyundai in VA), both said if the clutch wears/breaks they replace the entire transmission because the clutch is considered an internal part and Hyundai tells them to do so. I'm okay with replacing a clutch because it's a wear part and needs to be replaced every so often.

I couldn't believe how ridiculous it is that you can't just replace the clutch. I reached out to Consumer Reports to see if they would still recommend any Hyundai with a DCT because I'm being told the DCT is not replaceable. They took my question on their weekly car show, "Talking Cars."

https://youtu.be/zY35E5_mVZE?t=14m4s

Consumer Reports reached out to Hyundai about whether the DCT clutch is replaceable. Hyundai replied saying the clutch is an available part ($750) and replaceable. It was also noted on the show that the transmission does not need to be dropped in order to replace the DCT clutch. However, the two dealerships I spoke to said Hyundai tells the dealers to replace the entire transmission if the DCT clutch fails.

There seems to be disconnect between what Hyundai is telling Consumer Reports and the dealers. I guess you can bring the car to a 3rd party when the warranty expires, but finding someone who is truly knowledgeable about DCT's is hard.

I still on the fence on whether I should offload this car after a few years/ around when the warranty expires or just keep it?

What do you guys think about this situation?

Can anyone find this part? I looked everywhere online, for the life of me I can't find the clutch pack for the Elantra DCT.

I don't believe that Hyundai or Kia allows dismantling of the transmission. It is a complete remove and replace deal.

I don't understand why this should be a problem if properly driven. Both of my Hyundais have the 1.6T and DCT. I previously owned another and never had a problem. I believe this whole DCT deal is a lot of hysteria over improper driving habits. Above all, do not use the transmission to hill hold. Slipping the clutch will wear out any clutch. Use the brake instead.

I'm sure the greedy trial lawyers are licking their chops over a big nothing burger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
Hyundai is probably telling you the truth, at this stage of the game when clutches fail it's warranty work and then most likely more cost effective (less labor hrs) to replace the entire DCT and and ship it back to Hyundai repair facility where they will reman it and replace it another car where the DCT has failed. In the USA currently they may not bother to stock the clutch pack given they are replacing the whole tranny.

I think Missouri mule provided some food for thought - at some point below 100k miles conduct some rigorous testing of your DCT's hill holding capabilities.
 
  • Like
Reactions: grcauto

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,990 Posts
This reminds me of the GM Vortek engines. The fuel regulators would leak and the only solution given by GM was to replace the entire spider system. That's slang for the CPI unit. There was a friend from iatn that we called the fuel injection guru, his name was Jim Linder and owned Linder Technologies in Indy. He developed a replacement and sold thousands of them. I bought a few dozen over the years.
Where there's a need some industrious soul will find a solution. NOT the ENGINEERS or the MANUFACTURERS.
 

·
Registered
2020 Santa Fe SEL Plus
Joined
·
2,238 Posts
I would add that I had a long conversation with the local service manager as we know one another well and he doesn’t lie.

He had a customer come in and complain. The car was put in to gear and it didn’t move. Oh my goodness!

Turns out the customer had a bad habit of putting his foot on both the gas and the brake at the same time!

The brake will always override the transmission of any car, if the brakes are sound.

The driver just needed to be educated on how to drive.

I think this whole DCT business is one big con job.

I purposely bought both of my cars with the turbo and the DCT.

If that changes, I will be back here and eat a lot of crow.

In any event both are being dropped in the 2019 Tucson and replaced with the 2.4 engine and 6 speed conventional transmission.

That is available in the Sport right now. It’s good.

Don’t know about the Kona.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
I think this whole DCT business is one big con job.


Don’t know about the Kona.
Well yes available in the Kona and I believe the Velostar, and I think some posts indicate may continue to be available in markets other than North America. And a number of people like you are happy with the Tucson DCT and a car mag review of the 2017 or maybe it was the 2018 said that the DCT was much better than tested the 2016, which I don't think many will disagree had it's issues.

So the decision to cancel was probably owing to a number of factors - including the risk of a NHTSA recall and class action suit, most any mfg program is dependent on financial models with a range of assumptions and what if scenarios so one can assume that profitability was a risky proposition for Tucsons with the DCT.

But what I'm intending to point out that given the issues in the 2016 versions - tough to say Hyundai didn't dig themselves a hole by releasing a product that by many measures wasn't without it's issues, and which seemed most prominent in the AWD versions.

It's incumbent on any mfg to understand the legal and regulatory environment they are selling into as well as the ability of the target buyer to adopt to something new/different and by releasing a product that clearly had some early on issues Hyundai themselves made a big contribution to it's demise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It might be the case the DCT issues are one big nothing burger. However, how many of you would buy a car with a 5 spd Manual trans and on the window sticker it said, "CLUTCH NOT REPLACEABLE":

How many of you would buy it?

It might be covered by the initial warranty, but the car could be a ticking time bomb after that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,864 Posts
I couldn't believe how ridiculous it is that you can't just replace the clutch.

First, there are two clutches.
Maybe better to think of them more like band clutches in a conventional auto.
They are not between the engine and transmission like a manual clutch.


Maybe they shouldn't have called it a dual clutch transmission.
Automated manual also seems self-contradictory to me.
Perhaps dual gearset transmission? Dual shift transmission?


Hyundai might want failed transmissions back for failure analysis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
First, there are two clutches.



Maybe they shouldn't have called it a dual clutch transmission.
Automated manual also seems self-contradictory to me.
Perhaps dual gearset transmission? Dual shift transmission?


Hyundai might want failed transmissions back for failure analysis.
The name is the name and renaming it will in no way change how it operates or make it better or worse.

Hyundai of course wants them back to rebuild them and replace dual clutch transmissions that have failed in other cars.

Personally I like the name, Hyundai didn't invent it and whoever did should have the naming rights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
I hope my clutch fails under 100k miles, so I can get an entire assembly. I love Hyundai’s warranty and cheap parts. If it fails outside of warranty, just replace the clutch.
 

·
Registered
2020 Santa Fe SEL Plus
Joined
·
2,238 Posts
The 2019 Veloster is available with a stick. I suppose this will satisfy the purists.

The DCT came along before Hyundai adopted it. Hyundai shouldn’t be held responsible for a driver’s inability to put their foot on the brake and let it creep along partially engaged. That guarantees clutch failure just like would be encountered in a pure stick shift vehicle.

I had my first DCT in a 2011 Fiesta. It, like the Focus would stumble when first starting. It ruined the reputation of Ford in that the Focus had an impeccable reputation but with an outdated four speed automatic. I would call that a marketing failure on the part of Ford who should have known better. Now, it is irrelevant in that Ford is going to stop making sedans in the near future.

So far as I can see, the DCT offered by Hyundai is fundamentally sound and the only fault lies with drivers who don’t know how to properly drive an automated manual transmission.

Who will be blamed when some kid hot rods the manual Veloster?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
What vehicle did Hyundai 1st put the DCT in - I was under the impression that it was the 2016 Tucson - and based on the posts here of folks who bought early/mid 2016 production Tucsons and either theirs replaced or had multiple trip to the dealer the Hyundai DCT was not entirely ready for prime at that - if it was why did it require SW updates.

So releasing it before that had all the glitches didn't help, that prompted complaints to NHTSA , some not so great mag reviews, I drove a 2017 (I drove nothing but sticks for 20 yrs) and it worked pretty good .

So Hyundai was wise to drop it in the Tucson - but continue to offer it in Elantras and Konas without the early release negatives carried by the Tucson, and the models it's in btw have lighter vehicle weights than Tucson - I'm not so sure the AWD Tucson weren't pushing the limits of the DCT to smoothly launch the vehicle at all times, or at least smooth enough to satisfy drivers most of whom were used to driving auto boxes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,864 Posts
Hyundai shouldn’t be held responsible for a driver’s inability to put their foot on the brake and let it creep along partially engaged. That guarantees clutch failure just like would be encountered in a pure stick shift vehicle.

Seems like that could be prevented in software.
When the driver takes foot off the brake the clutch fully engages in a second or two, while the throttle compensates and keeps the engine at idle speed.
Just don't allow the clutch to slip for more than a second. Creeping blocked out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The 2019 Veloster is available with a stick. I suppose this will satisfy the purists.

The DCT came along before Hyundai adopted it. Hyundai shouldn’t be held responsible for a driver’s inability to put their foot on the brake and let it creep along partially engaged. That guarantees clutch failure just like would be encountered in a pure stick shift vehicle.

I had my first DCT in a 2011 Fiesta. It, like the Focus would stumble when first starting. It ruined the reputation of Ford in that the Focus had an impeccable reputation but with an outdated four speed automatic. I would call that a marketing failure on the part of Ford who should have known better. Now, it is irrelevant in that Ford is going to stop making sedans in the near future.

So far as I can see, the DCT offered by Hyundai is fundamentally sound and the only fault lies with drivers who don’t know how to properly drive an automated manual transmission.

Who will be blamed when some kid hot rods the manual Veloster?
If your kid hot dogs a 5spd Veloster, you can probably just replace the clutch - the DCT requires a complete overhaul at $6k (outside of warranty).

Seems like that could be prevented in software.
When the driver takes foot off the brake the clutch fully engages in a second or two, while the throttle compensates and keeps the engine at idle speed.
Just don't allow the clutch to slip for more than a second. Creeping blocked out.
I agree, that should have been added to the software. I believe my hyundai DCT has hillstop control to help with that, but like you said, it's not as good as complete disengagement of the clutch. Hyundai, also should have programed the DCt to prevent "creeping/inching" in traffic.

They did program the clutch to disengage when your foot is on the brake at a complete stop as outlined in this video:

https://youtu.be/W42zsFYjZvM?t=27s
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
What vehicle did Hyundai 1st put the DCT in - I was under the impression that it was the 2016 Tucson - and based on the posts here of folks who bought early/mid 2016 production Tucsons and either theirs replaced or had multiple trip to the dealer the Hyundai DCT was not entirely ready for prime at that - if it was why did it require SW updates.

So releasing it before that had all the glitches didn't help, that prompted complaints to NHTSA , some not so great mag reviews, I drove a 2017 (I drove nothing but sticks for 20 yrs) and it worked pretty good .

So Hyundai was wise to drop it in the Tucson - but continue to offer it in Elantras and Konas without the early release negatives carried by the Tucson, and the models it's in btw have lighter vehicle weights than Tucson - I'm not so sure the AWD Tucson weren't pushing the limits of the DCT to smoothly launch the vehicle at all times, or at least smooth enough to satisfy drivers most of whom were used to driving auto boxes.

I'm pretty sure the 2015 Sonata Eco was the first Hyundai with the DCT. I bought mine in November 2014 , so I probably was one of the first people in the country to get one. I haven't had any problems with mine. It does take getting used to at first. They put a small insert hanging off the drivers side sun visor telling you to not ride the clutch, don't hold the car on a hill using the clutch, etc. I don't think i would enjoy driving it if I had to do stop and go driving everyday, so thankfully I don't. I don't know why they had all the issues with the Tuscon, and not the Sonata. Isn't it the same transmission?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,458 Posts
Only speculation on my part - but at some point the vehicle weight comes into play with respect for a smooth engagement from standstill. Some do not agree, but you can't put a manual tranny from say a fiesta into a pickup truck, you'll get jerky launches/ stalls as the engine struggles to move the mass and eventually your clutch will wear or come apart.

I would be interesting to rank the Tucson complaints by model and FWD/AWD.

I saw a car mag test where a AWD fully loaded Tucson weighed in at 3786 lbs, that's some 400 lbs or more than Sonata ECOs, Elantras and Konas .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
982 Posts
... I spoke with two Hyundai dealers (Alexandra and Fairfax Hyundai in VA), both said if the clutch wears/breaks they replace the entire transmission because the clutch is considered an internal part and Hyundai tells them to do so.... ...Consumer Reports reached out to Hyundai about whether the DCT clutch is replaceable. Hyundai replied saying the clutch is an available part ($750) and replaceable...
If your clutch wears out, and it is no longer under warranty, take your vehicle to County Transmission in Vienna. They are a great transmission shop, very knowledgeable. They will replace the clutch only, if it is possible to do so. They have fixed transmissions for me, and in one case put the vehicle up on the lift to show me why it did NOT need transmission work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Only speculation on my part - but at some point the vehicle weight comes into play with respect for a smooth engagement from standstill. Some do not agree, but you can't put a manual tranny from say a fiesta into a pickup truck, you'll get jerky launches/ stalls as the engine struggles to move the mass and eventually your clutch will wear or come apart.

I would be interesting to rank the Tucson complaints by model and FWD/AWD.

I saw a car mag test where a AWD fully loaded Tucson weighed in at 3786 lbs, that's some 400 lbs or more than Sonata ECOs, Elantras and Konas .
I was thinking the same thing, AWD and throw in 2 overweight adults and kids - I can see that over stressing the DCT.

If your clutch wears out, and it is no longer under warranty, take your vehicle to County Transmission in Vienna. They are a great transmission shop, very knowledgeable. They will replace the clutch only, if it is possible to do so. They have fixed transmissions for me, and in one case put the vehicle up on the lift to show me why it did NOT need transmission work.
I'll keep that place in mind, it's so hard to find an honest repair shop. When I lived in Columbia, MD it took me years to find a good reputable shop. I just can get over the the fact Hyundai couldn't design the clutch to be easily replaced at the dealer. Sometimes I go hunting on Autotrader to see I can find any Hyundai DCT cars over 100,000 miles, I have yet to find any.
 

·
Registered
2019 Elantra GT N-Line 2018 Elantra GT Sport
Joined
·
246 Posts
I've got a few things to offer up in this thread. Heh. I'm only here to look every few months, but thought I would offer up some information.

This may be an informative read: Hyundai Veloster: Dual Clutch Transmission(DCT) System - Hyundai Veloster 2010-2019 Service Manual Curious to see if "uprated" clutchpacks are possible for the dry DCT since they are only good up to around 275-300 lb-ft.

However, it may be a moot point since I've seen many discussions that a DCT with a higher torque rating is being developed for the N cars, and a Veloster N DCT has been all but confirmed for the US, as the i30 N DCT has been confirmed. Difference being it is (rightfully-so) a WET clutch DCT. Same vein as VW's wet clutch DSG transmissions.

https://www.autoevolution.com/news/hyundai-i30-n-dct-coming-in-2019-with-eight-speeds-124418.html
https://www.caradvice.com.au/632003/hyundai-i30-n-dual-clutch-auto-confirmed-for-late-2019/


Also, I did read about the Tucson DCT overheating and Neutral-stuck issues. But those appear to have been resolved with a few ECU flashes. Nevertheless, looks like the recall was approved. Though my casual search on the NHTSA site didn't bring anything up, and I'm not taking a ton of time to research it as I don't own one. https://www.torquenews.com/3793/hyundai-transmission-recall-problem-opportunities

I may not have a horse in this race, personally. I plan to trade my Value Edition sedan on an N-Line, this Spring, and by the time the lease is up there should be a Veloster N DCT on the market. Provided I don't tire of the FWD warm/hot hatch race and go for a different make or vehicle class entirely. My reasons for the DCT and not the manual are threefold:
- The DCT is quicker, full stop.
- SF Bay Area traffic sucks. I can only practically own one vehicle. So I need to compromise.
- I have permanent damage in my left foot, including Titanium plates. Some days, my left foot isn't even up to the task of walking properly, much less holding a clutch down.

But thought this all might contribute to the thread in some fashion.

All that's left is Hyundai's announcements and/or confirmation of new DCT models. The Tucscon N has been announced. So let's see what drivetrain goes in it, and infer from there.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top