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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a 2011 Sonata Limited and I am very happy with it. However, I almost regret not buying the turbo model. So my question is:

How would i go about adding a turbo to the 2.4? Parts, etc.

I heard the turbo in the 2.0T models is not a conventional design. Any truth behind this? Any photos diagrams out there?

I did some 3rd grade math and estimated a 2.4T should produce about 325 vs 2.0T 274.

I live in louisiana so if anyone is willing to do the work. let me know.
 

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Until there is aftermarket tuning and hard parts to build up the motor you are not going to have much luck. Do what I'm doing and make a deal to trade in for the turbo.
 

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Its going to be more cost effective/reliable to trade your current model in and go get a turbo.

Eventually you will see "eBay" kits pop up. They will be half assed, contain el CHEAPO parts and most likely will not deliver anywhere near the results you expect provided the engine runs at all after install.
 

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Unfortunately, the Sonata 2.4 is not pegged as a performance / tuners vehicle and a turbo model already exists, so I highly doubt any reputable manufacturers will make any turbo / sc kit for it. If you want to be the pioneer and have one manufactured, you're looking at spending anywhere between $3K (on the very low side) to upwards of $8k, a whole lot of downtime for your vehicle, and the substantial risk of a blown engine with voided warranty.

As Bearcats stated about eBay kits surfacing eventually; if/when they do begin to pop up, avoid them... Nothing good can come from cheaping out such a large modification.

Also as the others have stated; your best bet would be to eat the difference and trade in for a turbo model... All the bones are already there, and I'm sure that there will be a few legitimate companies producing aftermarket performance parts for it. Judging by the Genesis coupe 2.0t, I'm sure it'll be pretty easy to tweak additional power out of the 2.0t GDI at very low cost (you could probably eke out 300-320 crank hp with a few simple bolt ons), and if you have the $5K (avg estimated) to throw at adding a turbo to the 2.4 you should EASILY be able to get the 2.0t GDI into the mid to upper 300s at the wheels.

Another consideration is that the 2.4, while a solid engine, is built for its task, so I'd be very concerned about reliability even if you were to get it to run properly with a turbo... Hyundai HEAVILY overbuilt the 2.0t GDI for the Sonata, so there should be a lot of reliable room to play with.
 

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QUOTE (theprodigy79 @ Nov 12 2010, 10:00 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=371118
you should EASILY be able to get the 2.0t GDI into the mid to upper 300s at the wheels.

Hyundai HEAVILY overbuilt the 2.0t GDI for the Sonata, so there should be a lot of reliable room to play with.
Using 91 octane the numbers at the wheels, are a very peaky torque of 239 lb-ft arrives at 3500 rpm, and the power peak of 234 horsepower is reached at 6100 rpm. What modifications are you considering? How is the automatic transmission going to hold up?
 

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QUOTE (theprodigy79 @ Nov 12 2010, 10:00 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=371118
Hyundai HEAVILY overbuilt the 2.0t GDI for the Sonata, so there should be a lot of reliable room to play with.
Not to sound like a douche but do where did u hear/find this information? If its online id like to see and find out more about my sonata's engine and its limits, thanks! =)
 

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QUOTE (Shoot2Thrill @ Nov 13 2010, 04:34 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=371382
Using 91 octane the numbers at the wheels, are a very peaky torque of 239 lb-ft arrives at 3500 rpm, and the power peak of 234 horsepower is reached at 6100 rpm. What modifications are you considering? How is the automatic transmission going to hold up?
You removed an important part of my quote... being that with the money put toward adding a turbo to the 2.4l you should easily be able to get those numbers with the 2.0t... meaning, if you have $5K+ to throw at the Sonata turbo you should easily be able to afford a turbo upgrade and any supporting modifications. It was a fairly generic statement intended to make the point that the 2.0t is a far better platform to begin with.

Those numbers are pretty conservative given that amount of money (or even a couple $k less), and are based on what I've seen done with the Genesis Coupe 2.0t (there are currently several hitting more than 400+hp to the wheels). The 2.0t GDI is substantially upgraded over the 2.0t in the Genesis, however, and should be easier to derive power from (esp considering that it puts out substantially more from the start).
 

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QUOTE (kton @ Nov 13 2010, 08:44 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=371430
Not to sound like a douche but do where did u hear/find this information? If its online id like to see and find out more about my sonata's engine and its limits, thanks! =)
From the following link http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/sedans...rive/index.html :

The Sonata's mill utilizes the same aluminum block as the Genesis Coupe's 2.0-liter turbo, but boasts reinforced pistons and connecting rods, a new cylinder head (for the direct injection), a slightly higher compression ratio (9.5:1 vs. 9.4:1), a twin-scroll rather than single-scroll turbo, and, most notable, a compact balance shaft module that vastly improves engine NVH, especially with the pedal to the metal. Whereas the Genesis's 2.0T can be buzzy and unrefined at WOT, the Sonata's is euphonious and polished. And if you're worried about the reliability of a turbo, consider this: Hyundai subjected the 2.0T to 300 continuous hours of WOT testing, followed by double and triple bogeys (20 hours each of additional WOT above redline).

From the following link http://www.insideline.com/hyundai/sonata/2...irst-drive.html :

Hyundai didn't simply bolt this turbo to an existing Theta II engine, as numerous changes were made to enable the inline-4 to withstand the more severe conditions of turbocharging. The changes include a reinforced aluminum block (still with an open deck, however), beefier connecting rods of a different alloy than those in the 2.4-liter mill, pistons with thicker ring lands, oil squirters, plus new valves and valve seats that are tolerant of higher temperatures.

The new pistons also lower the compression ratio to 9.5:1. Boost pressure reaches 17.2 psi at 1,750 rpm and tapers to about 14 psi by 5,500 rpm, at which point the boost is reduced to prevent exhaust backpressure and also keep the turbo rpm from running away.

A lot of attention was paid to cylinder head cooling in order to stave off detonation. As Hyundai's White says, solving the puzzle involved "the combination of a lot of little things that all added up." Coolant passages in the head were enlarged thanks to smaller-diameter spark plugs. The front-mounted air-to-air intercooler received its own dedicated duct. Direct injection is key in providing a charge cooling effect, while the retention of hot exhaust gases in the combustion chambers is minimized through careful attention to manifold tuning.

Development tests for the new mill included 300 hours at wide-open throttle, followed by 20 hours of operation at 6,700 rpm (the rev limiter is set at 6,600 rpm in the car). While the durability testing included 87 octane fuel, engineers hint that the calibration of the 2.0T will automatically take advantage of higher octane — on premium fuel, peak horsepower goes up by about 10. And although peak torque is unaffected by the addition of premium fuel, the area of torque curve before the peak is said to plump up somewhat.


From the following link http://manlyauto.blogspot.com/2010/10/2011...nata-turbo.html :

Sure, Ford and GM has tried the same thing, but Hyundai has gone beyond to make their new turbo-charged engine something totally new. Instead of a standard cast-iron piece, the engine is housed in a cast stainless-steel exhaust manifold. This allows it to handle pressures beyond what it was designed for in order to make sure it last much longer. In fact, Hyundai has put it to the test. 300 hours of grueling wide-open throttle testing that was then followed up with an extra 20 hours with engine speeds that were above the redline.

The engine's temperature is kept under control thanks to Hyundai's new aluminum thermal sprayed counter spiny liner. This is a new way of layering aluminum on the outside of the cylinder sleeve, increasing surface area and allowing for better cooling efficiency. This is the first time such a spray has been used in the auto industry. Leave it to Hyundai to come up with such an innovation.

There is also a unique air channeling system that is located on the vehicle's intercooler. This guide sends air to both the intake and outtake areas located on the intercooler, keeping the intake air up to fifty degrees cooler than it would be if there were no guide.


There's a pretty consistent theme here, and it can be found pretty easily in practically any in depth review. Hyundai built the engine to take a heck of a beating; far beyond what 'normal' conditions will ever produce... If anything Hyundai is stating is true, this engine should be a contender, easily able to handle some pretty good increases in power. There's a reason it'll be making its way into the Genesis Coupe soon as well, replacing the current 2.0t... and as stated above, that 2.0t is already putting down some serious numbers in several cars.

Regarding the question about the transmission... I have no idea how that will pan out. The transmission is supposed to be greatly simplified over previous generations, which SHOULD technically mean less to break, but only time will tell how durable it is.
 

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waste of time and money IMO... why not just get the 2.0t sonata and have the oem quality turbo instead of custom made turbo kit that is not suppose to be on NA engines that might go wrong at anytime..? lots of aftermarket items should be avaiable for the 2.0t sonatas with genesis coupe 2.0t counter parts as well..
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
QUOTE (theprodigy79 @ Nov 12 2010, 11:00 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=371118
(2,a) "If you want to be the pioneer and have one manufactured, you're looking at spending anywhere between $3K (on the very low side) to upwards of $8k, a whole lot of downtime for your vehicle, and the substantial risk of a blown engine with voided warranty.

(3)..eBay kits surfacing eventually...

(1)Also as the others have stated; your best bet would be to eat the difference and trade in for a turbo model...

.(2b)..and if you have the $5K (avg estimated) to throw at adding a turbo to the 2.4 you should EASILY be able to get the 2.0t GDI into the mid to upper 300s at the wheels.
sw
....Hyundai HEAVILY overbuilt the 2.0t GDI for the Sonata, so there should be a lot of reliable room to play with.
In response I assigned the quoted material to address each point of my answer or the topic of discussion in logical order:
Responses:
1.) I test drove a base 2.0t yesterday and i definitely felt the 50-75hp difference but the hardware felt cheap!?!
Considering i already put my 2k miles on my limited -- the depreciation and cost difference im looking at 4k.
2.) I wouldm't mind putting another 4-6k into a 2.4T for the rare, X factor -- plus the stereo would have to be re-stocked before trade in b/c is modded if i traded for a 2.0T. (See my post in the 2011 sonata stealthbox forum for details.)
3.) Thanks for e-bay advice but I agree those kits are gut-wrenching funny to see and imagine installed(if possible).

Ideally i'd like a "sleeper" sonata.
I wouldn't miss $10k.

What could i get done with 10k?
 

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The only thing is that the 2.4L is running at 11.3 : 1 compression which seems a little high to add a turbo to, but I could be wrong. Just remember, if you build up the engine, you have to make sure everything behind it will handle the added power. :banana:
 

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QUOTE (tripenol @ Nov 14 2010, 08:12 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=371502
In response I assigned the quoted material to address each point of my answer or the topic of discussion in logical order:
Responses:
1.) I test drove a base 2.0t yesterday and i definitely felt the 50-75hp difference but the hardware felt cheap!?!
Considering i already put my 2k miles on my limited -- the depreciation and cost difference im looking at 4k.
2.) I wouldm't mind putting another 4-6k into a 2.4T for the rare, X factor -- plus the stereo would have to be re-stocked before trade in b/c is modded if i traded for a 2.0T. (See my post in the 2011 sonata stealthbox forum for details.)
3.) Thanks for e-bay advice but I agree those kits are gut-wrenching funny to see and imagine installed(if possible).

Ideally i'd like a "sleeper" sonata.
I wouldn't miss $10k.

What could i get done with 10k?
1. You need to compare apples to apples; if you own a Limited currently, why test a base turbo?

2. I understand that it's neat-o to have an "x factor", but the 2.4 would have to be built to sustain boost... There are no aftermarket internals available for the 2.4, and I doubt there will be, so you're on your own there... As another member rightfully stated, the 2.4 is a high compression engine; you're simply dealing with an engine that wasn't intended for that purpose. I'm not saying it's not doable - I hold the utmost respect for people who pioneer - but it's a heck of a task and you'll certainly need to weigh your risks... A blown engine with a voided warranty may be worth removing your stereo...

3. You'd be surprised by the amount of people who actually purchase the stuff... Admittedly, SOME of it is legit, but with the amount of garbage out there you gotta watch it.

Look dude, not to diss your idea of a 'sleeper' Sonata, but they all look pretty much the same... remove the 2.0t badge, pump in whatever extra funds you have and call it a day. You'll have a **** of a sleeper, and save yourself the embarrassment of pumping $10k into the 2.4 just to have someone with a 2.0t with $2k in it run all over you...
 

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Turbo-ing the 2.4 is a "meh" idea.

Now if you really want performance for $10k...

Click Here

I'm sure it would fit in the trunk... :whistling:

Keep the 2.4 up front and you could even call it a hybrid... :innocent:
 

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QUOTE (redYFosonata @ Nov 15 2010, 04:15 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=371728
I haven't heard too much about the 2.0t, but my first worry about increasing hp on the 2.0t is the transmission.
I haven't really looked at the transmission setup for the 2.0t vs the 2.4, however I'd assume that the transmission for the 2.0t is the same, if not moderately upgraded over the 2.4 (it would be backward logic to place a weaker transmission with a far more powerful vehicle)... In the worst case - it sharing the same, unmodified transmission with the 2.4 - it's still a far more viable platform over the 2.4 overall.
 

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If the worries are will the stock transmission handle an upgrade to the Turbo wont be a concern warranty wise; as it won't.

If warranty coverage isn't a problem its anybodies guess unless people can determine if the same transmission is being used. Model number and manufacturer would be a good start.
 

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QUOTE (dsx724 @ Nov 15 2010, 02:41 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=371936
Whats the point of a high performance motor attached to the slowest transmission ever?
Slowest ever? Are you talking about the YF's? If so, you ought to take your car straight to the dealerships service department for repair. I have the same tranny and it is no DSG, but it is faster at shifting than some other kind-of speedy cars out there. I travel a lot, and rent many speedy new cars. I'm not young so I've owned many cars. I've spent many paychecks so I can autocross some of my cars. I like the YF's 6 speed auto.
 
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