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I can never figure out when either the turbo will kick on, or has kicked on. So, I think a turbo light on the dash would have been useful. I have had this car for 8 months, and I still cannot drive it effectively. When I mash it, I dont feel as much pull as when I barely give it gas at 30 miles an hour and it pulls itself away noticeablely, and almost always when I dont want it to do it. There is definitely a power band, but I have yet to find it. Just a frustration. Maybe by the time I sell it, I will have figured out how to drive it. It almost seems like the only way to ensure the turbo will kick in predictably is to use the paddle shifters and downshift a couple of gears and then mash it. Dunno.
 

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Are you by any chance a former Honda driver? The way you ask about having a light to show when the turbo "kicks in" reminds me of how some Honda enthusiasts talk about Vtec.

In all seriousness though, a turbo isn't quite as simple as being on or off so a light wouldn't help you much. If you want to have a visual cue of what your turbo is up to, then what you're looking for would be a boost meter. This would show you when the turbo is providing boost pressure to the engine, and exactly how much. I believe there's another post somewhere on this forum where people have discussed installing mechanical boost meters, but there's also electronic ones which connect to the car's OBD2 port. If you have an android smartphone or tablet, another option would be an app called "torque" which when combined with a bluetooth OBD2 reader (about $20 on amazon), can provide you with tons of information about your car and the engine, including acting as a boost meter by providing a reading based on the intake manifold's absolute pressure (MAF) sensor.

As for not feeling that pull when you mash the pedal, you should keep in mind that our car's computers hold back the car a bit when it's in first and second gear to prevent torque steer and to provide for smoother acceleration from a stop, which likely explains why you only feel that rocket-like power when you gun it while already going over 30 MPH. It is a family sedan after all so we can't really expect it to snap our heads back from a stop like a drag racer. I suspect Hyundai's real reason for doing this though was probably so that the Sonata wouldn't cannibalize sales from the Genesis.
 
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