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Discussion Starter #1
Was showing my daughter how to check the oil on her recently acquired 2017 Tucson, her previous car was a 2007 Elantra on which she was able to open the hood and position the support strut. Not so on the Tucson - I can understand why this thing weighs some 3600 lbs, the hood was absurdly heavy. No way they shouldn't have gas hood struts standard on this car. Wonder if base competitors models use the hood support rod as well.
Well I did tell her to consider a RAV4, Rogue or CX-5, the latter being my pick of the litter, but the Hyundai was as frequently stated on this site "several thousand $$ less", but also several hundred lbs heftier.
 

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I thought the same thing yesterday when I put some more washer fluid in. On my past 2 jeeps I installed gas shocks but not sure if they would enough umph to lift this hood.

Sent from my LG-H931 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not an issue for me, but you might consider this:

Tucson 2016+Hood shock kit

I think a few other members have gotten it or similar with good results.
Thanks, price is reasonable, I think I'll order it. Do the higher trim levels come with these , I'd assume so.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hmmmmm:wacko: i never lift the hood???

so i don't have that problem .....lol
Conceivably one could use it to do arm presses, the effort to raise it surprised me, probably a lot of sound deadening in there, the Tuscon is a fairly hefty vehicle, I suspect the weight contributed to the issues some experienced with the dct , trying to move that heft from a dead start with a small displacement engine can be problematic.
 

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195lb ft of torque by 1500rpm is hardly insufficient moving the beast, quite the opposite. DCT tranny had other problems imo, some user induced. Be interesting to see where avg consumer market DCT goes from here, been a 'rough ride' for most makers who try it.

And oh yes the hood is heavy - actually quite like the heft of it - weird I know. I like keeping the bay clean as possible with light maintenance so I'm in there every wash.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
195lb ft of torque by 1500rpm is hardly insufficient moving the beast, quite the opposite. DCT tranny had other problems imo, some user induced. Be interesting to see where avg consumer market DCT goes from here, been a 'rough ride' for most makers who try it.
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Seems odd Hyundai would drop the dct from the Tucson - and put it in the Kona where it is reportedly quite smooth and I read it is or is going to be in the Velostar - both significantly lighter vehicles.

Yes the 1.6t produces plenty of power at 1,500 rpm - but as with manual gearboxes 1st gear is the challenge - you get unwanted results if too much power applied (when boosted) car will rocket forward, but too little and you get the sluggishness and jerking reported early on . Like a manual tranny in a heavy vehicle with a small displacement 4 cylinder from a dead stop - dump the clutch and the vehicle would stall or jerk, too much throttle and you compromise vehicle control, yes skilled users learn to manage this, application of throttle while engaging the clutch, but the weight of the vehicle does definately matter.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ok, I checked and it's maybe 5-10 lbs heavier, not much heavier. But it's definitely all in the sound deadening. on the hood.
Thanks for checking - but to complete the weight/benefit analysis the difference in noise levels will need to be identified in decibels.:laugh:

Modern cars take pains to shave ounces - the 2018 Camry uses an aluminum hood and the F150 in various body panels and I think the hood as well. Well if the safety latches ever fail on the Tucson maybe the extra weight will keep the hood in place.
 

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I think the heavy hood helps add to the overall structural rigidity of the Tucson. If you compare it to its competitors, the Tucson is solid and displays no flexing over rough roads or bumps. Its weight is similar to its competitors because its extensive use of high-strength steel allows it to be strong without being overweight. I love the way it feels.
 

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My wife has a Prius. In order to save weight, all of the body panels are very thin and light. But the car flexes and twists like taffy on bumpy roads. I don't expect it to hold up very well over time.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I think the heavy hood helps add to the overall structural rigidity of the Tucson. If you compare it to its competitors, the Tucson is solid and displays no flexing over rough roads or bumps. Its weight is similar to its competitors because its extensive use of high-strength steel allows it to be strong without being overweight. I love the way it feels.
Hoods rarely add to structural rigidity of a vehicle - the roof definately does. It is a solid built car, albeit a bit heavier than competitors, Hyundai made a big point of pitching the use of high strength steel in the new Sante Fe - but guess what every maker is using "high strength steel" I know of none using low or mid strength steel. Mostly a marketing pitch. Hyundai did I recall use an epoxy or something to strengthen the seams and make them quiet, iirc.
 

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Hoods rarely add to structural rigidity of a vehicle - the roof definately does. It is a solid built car, albeit a bit heavier than competitors, Hyundai made a big point of pitching the use of high strength steel in the new Sante Fe - but guess what every maker is using "high strength steel" I know of none using low or mid strength steel. Mostly a marketing pitch. Hyundai did I recall use an epoxy or something to strengthen the seams and make them quiet, iirc.
It's written right here: https://www.sae.org/news/2015/08/hy...luding-world-first-dual-member-damper-housing

They use glues on suspension mounts to bond multiple layers of metal to make a strong solid mounting structure.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I think the heavy hood helps add to the overall structural rigidity of the Tucson. If you compare it to its competitors, the Tucson is solid and displays no flexing over rough roads or bumps. Its weight is similar to its competitors because its extensive use of high-strength steel allows it to be strong without being overweight. I love the way it feels.
you are very correct about the weight - according to C &D tests, it's about the same - figure another 200lbs for awd. Detailed comparisons in the link below, including a decibel comparison.

www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2018-h...ai-tucson-performance-and-driving-impressions
 

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Hoods rarely add to structural rigidity of a vehicle - the roof definately does. It is a solid built car, albeit a bit heavier than competitors, Hyundai made a big point of pitching the use of high strength steel in the new Sante Fe - but guess what every maker is using "high strength steel" I know of none using low or mid strength steel. Mostly a marketing pitch. Hyundai did I recall use an epoxy or something to strengthen the seams and make them quiet, iirc.
I think the marketing was they use a higher percentage of it, plus make it themselves - and as you mentioned, the use of adhesives.

Read recently they also supply said steel to other makers.
 
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