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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know what this TSB is for..

TSB #5NP-A4C8N-03
NHTSA ID #10129908
  • FEBRUARY 07 2018
Summary: This TSB provides information on the headlight pattern changes on certain 2018 MY Sonata (LFa), Elantra (ADa)(AD), Elantra GT (PD), Santa Fe Sport (AN), and Santa Fe (NC).

What do they mean by "pattern changes" My 2018 headlight pattern out in front of the car is different than my wifes 2017. We both have the Ultimate so our headlights move when we turn the wheel.
 

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You just hit the nail right on the head. "Pattern" refers to the way the light is distributed. Per the bulletin select 2018 models will have a different pattern than those of prior years. Thus sitting behind the wheel what you see in your 2018 may appear different.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That is what I thought. Thanks for the info. My 2018 has a few dark spots in the pattern where my wifes 2017 does not. Do you think this TSB would change the pattern or just let the customer know the pattern is different? I have read a lot of posts and you have been real helpful.
 

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I would guess that the TSB is simply informing the Dealers that there IS a difference so that they do not start replacing headlamp assemblies because some are different. Updating to the newer design will almost certainly be prohibitively expensive IF it can even be done. You'd be father ahead to see if you can mount any other type of legal auxiliary lighting up front.

Thank you for the kind words. I have a 2015 and 2017 Santa Fe in the stable. The vast majority of my 39 years of working experience has been with Chevrolet, which is why we drive Hyundai products :) GM has come a long way but they still fall short IMHO. No one ever has all of the information / knowledge. There are new surprises and challenges every day so I don't always get it right. Just try to help when I can...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Your welcome. I was a airline mechanic for 20 years. Now I over see the fleet maintenance for the city of Greensboro NC. (Police cars, trucks, city cars) I went from a Q50 to the SFS. Big difference in cars. Wife has had hers for over 2 years and not a single problem. She said I needed to get something we could take the kids in and what not so I found a SFS Ultimate with 10,000 miles and got it. I dont like the 2019 body style. The DBW on this car is the only thing I am having a hard time getting use to. Its slow. I dont think I have driven a DBW car that I really like. Cable throttle is where my heart is at. Q50 DBW was a little slow but this car has a lot of delay. Biggest thing is braking for a car turning then jump on the gas and nothing. Its just programmed that way and I will have to get use to it. I appreciate your help.
 

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Hmm. Never really noticed any throttle delay in our 2015 or 2017 except when in Eco mode. Both the 2.4L and the V6 respond well. Now there can be delays in transmission downshifting as the computers decide what gear to drop to, reduce engine torque, etc... The more forward gears you have the worse it generally becomes. Jumping from brake to moderate or hard throttle is where the most issues occur. A full half second delay is not unusual for some GM vehicles with 6-10 speed transmissions. Most owners report it as a hesitation or lack of power and that half of a second feels like an eternity.

Having grown up driving 60s and 70s vehicle including a number of muscle cars, I also appreciate the old school throttle cables and that fact that since the transmission downshifts were generally cable or linkage driven you could customize the downshift points to some extent. Today's vehicles are superior in many ways, but there are tomes when an old 340 or 360 powered Dodge Dart is fondly remembered and desired :)

They were fun and you could pound the snot out of them and they'd come back for more....
 

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Torque management by the computer off the line makes most new vehicles seem slower than they should be. It makes things easier on the drive train parts, but wastes all that low rpm torque a turbo motor makes. I put a Pedal Commander on my 2017 and it makes a big difference. They work by changing the pedal position signal to make the computer think the throttle pedal is a bit further depressed than it really is. They are completely invisible otherwise. I have one on my Colorado as well. They are a little pricey, but they help the problem and I like the result.

pedalcommander.com There are others that do the same thing too.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Crock I am already there. I was going to order one this week. Had one on my TL and my Q50. I emailed them and the email response the sales person said to use a PC24. But there site says PC71 when I put my make and model in. Do you know which one you used because it would be the same for my car.
 

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I don't remember, though it may not matter as I was the first one to have one on the 2017 model. It turned out that Hyundai had changed the connector on the 2017 and the original one would not work. They sent me a new one with the correct connector after I provided them with a picture of it. So, I'm guessing the one they are telling you to order is the one with the new type connector.
 
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