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The past two days in Ottawa here it was roughly -39'c with the windchill, probably -25'c base temperature. That being said I would let my 2.0T SE model warm up for about 5-10 minutes and then take off for work. The shifting from gear to gear for about 2-3 minutes (City driving) is very 'laggy' and reminds me of one of my dads old beater cars where the transmission was slipping and on the verge of letting go. I'm sure that it is a combination of everything being so cold and the fluids in the vehicle are probably still in a state equivalent to liquid honey at best until its been running for a while. Anybody else have this issue?
 

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Yup, same here. My Jeep used to as well.... Warm it up for 4-5 min.
 

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my sonata used to act the same way on really cold mornings. shifts better now with full synthetic fluid.
 

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The past two days in Ottawa here it was roughly -39'c with the windchill, probably -25'c base temperature. That being said I would let my 2.0T SE model warm up for about 5-10 minutes and then take off for work. The shifting from gear to gear for about 2-3 minutes (City driving) is very 'laggy' and reminds me of one of my dads old beater cars where the transmission was slipping and on the verge of letting go. I'm sure that it is a combination of everything being so cold and the fluids in the vehicle are probably still in a state equivalent to liquid honey at best until its been running for a while. Anybody else have this issue?
Auto's will do that.
 

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Happen to me as well but I knew it was probably the viscosity of my tranny fluid at the time. Great suggestion about idling in gear for a minute. I will try that.
 

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I am glad to hear that all of that hot air from Parliament Hill is keeping you warmer. Our last two days have been between -50C and -57C with the wind chill.

You are right about the viscosity of the oil. Colder equals thicker.
 

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Have had the same issue with mine in cold weather ever since I bought it last January. It's normal. Just drive gently at first until things warm up.
 

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Your vehicle is not affected by windchill.
Yes it is. Wind chill is a quantity expressing the effective lowering of the air temperature caused by the wind, especially as affecting the rate of heat loss from an object. (Google: define wind chill).

The object may be we humans or inanimate objects, such as our trucks and cars.

Cold is the lack of energy that excites molecules. With out energy, many metals/plastics become brittle and susceptible to breakage as their molecules line up in crystalline form. Fluids drop in viscosity and offer greater resistance to movement through openings. More energy needs to be applied to allow the molecular stands to flex and remain liquid. More energy means easier to push, in this case through the smaller openings of the automatic transmission.

More energy required, equals lower fuel economy over a measured distance. I.E. Between me and the fuel station pump. :cool:
 

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Yes it is. Wind chill is a quantity expressing the effective lowering of the air temperature caused by the wind, especially as affecting the rate of heat loss from an object. (Google: define wind chill).

The object may be we humans or inanimate objects, such as our trucks and cars.

Cold is the lack of energy that excites molecules. With out energy, many metals/plastics become brittle and susceptible to breakage as their molecules line up in crystalline form. Fluids drop in viscosity and offer greater resistance to movement through openings. More energy needs to be applied to allow the molecular stands to flex and remain liquid. More energy means easier to push, in this case through the smaller openings of the automatic transmission.

More energy required, equals lower fuel economy over a measured distance. I.E. Between me and the fuel station pump. :cool:
I should have specified....as far as starting your vehicle is concerned, the wind chill factor has no impact at all. ;)
 

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Yes it is. Wind chill is a quantity expressing the effective lowering of the air temperature caused by the wind, especially as affecting the rate of heat loss from an object. (Google: define wind chill).

The object may be we humans or inanimate objects, such as our trucks and cars.

Cold is the lack of energy that excites molecules. With out energy, many metals/plastics become brittle and susceptible to breakage as their molecules line up in crystalline form. Fluids drop in viscosity and offer greater resistance to movement through openings. More energy needs to be applied to allow the molecular stands to flex and remain liquid. More energy means easier to push, in this case through the smaller openings of the automatic transmission.

More energy required, equals lower fuel economy over a measured distance. I.E. Between me and the fuel station pump. :cool:
Sorry but try googling again. It is true that cold weather affects your car as you explained, but the wind does not. Windchill is simply a factor of how much quicker a heated object will lose temperature. If you measure the outdoor temperature to be -20, your car will be -20 as well regardless of wind. The wind cannot make it colder than this, however it will cause your hot car to cool off to -20 more quickly than if there was no wind.

Explained well here: Feature: Does the wind chill affect your car? - Autos.ca

Don't mean to rant, just a common misunderstanding I see all over the web.
 

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Sorry but try googling again. It is true that cold weather affects your car as you explained, but the wind does not. Windchill is simply a factor of how much quicker a heated object will lose temperature. If you measure the outdoor temperature to be -20, your car will be -20 as well regardless of wind. The wind cannot make it colder than this, however it will cause your hot car to cool off to -20 more quickly than if there was no wind.

Explained well here: Feature: Does the wind chill affect your car? - Autos.ca

Don't mean to rant, just a common misunderstanding I see all over the web.
I was about to explain but you did it for me ;) yeah wind-chill only affect living creatures, it's a burning sensation on the skin.
 

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Just as if your power steering was pretty sluggish as well huh because I know mine was when we were -20F with -60F wind chill.
 
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