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On my 2014 S.F. i kept it simple & drained ATF Cold thru the bottom drain bolt into a measured container & cleaned the ferrous metal muck attached on the end of the magnet. what comes out is exactly the amount of new fluid that goes in. I personally think it's a better way of draining ATF then what others do on here. that plastic cap on the side of the pan is not the greatest design if You ask me.? because the cap turns to a pre-set point to tighten then stops after that. it wont turn anymore after that from there on... so I leave it alone for fear of any seapage leak.
 

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That plastic cap on the side of the pan is not the greatest design if you ask me. Because the cap turns to a pre-set point to tighten, then stops after that...it wont turn anymore after that from there on...so I leave it alone for fear of any seepage leak.
Your method is probably best for most folks, but it assumes the fluid is at the correct level. I have a 2011 made at the beginning of 2010...the "over-flow/level" plug is threaded metal.
 

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On my 2014 S.F. i kept it simple & drained ATF Cold thru the bottom drain bolt into a measured container & cleaned the ferrous metal muck attached on the end of the magnet. what comes out is exactly the amount of new fluid that goes in. I personally think it's a better way of draining ATF then what others do on here. that plastic cap on the side of the pan is not the greatest design if You ask me.? because the cap turns to a pre-set point to tighten then stops after that. it wont turn anymore after that from there on... so I leave it alone for fear of any seapage leak.
Several
On my 2014 S.F. i kept it simple & drained ATF Cold thru the bottom drain bolt into a measured container & cleaned the ferrous metal muck attached on the end of the magnet. what comes out is exactly the amount of new fluid that goes in. I personally think it's a better way of draining ATF then what others do on here. that plastic cap on the side of the pan is not the greatest design if You ask me.? because the cap turns to a pre-set point to tighten then stops after that. it wont turn anymore after that from there on... so I leave it alone for fear of any seapage leak.
Just out of curiosity, how much fluid do you get out of the cold 2.0T?
I've talked to several guys at transmission shops using your method and they're all convinced that they get more fluid out this way.
 

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Just out of curiosity, how much fluid do you get out of the cold 2.0T?
I've talked to several guys at transmission shops using your method and they're all convinced that they get more fluid out this way.
approximately ( 3.9 - 4 Liters )

I totally respect trany tech's however. keep in mind there customers vehicles that they see usually for the most part come in already warmed up or close to trans operating temp's I Just believe it's so much easier at draning a cold trany fluid then to do drain one. when it's hot"? ATF fluid will expand in fluid Volume with heat. so you can get a little more out when ATF fluid is

hot. BUT it also makes it dificult to Judge afterword on how much room temp ATF fluid to add back in. I recommend keeping it simple I only do my drain & Fills cold for that very reason for me it's not about doing it fast it's about doing it properly
 

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There may be a flaw in my "logic", but I would think expansion would be minimal. The bulb in a mercury or alcohol thermometer is massive compared to its thinly made stem. :geek:
 

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The thermal expansion for transmission fluids is around 0.0007 per degree C (0.07%/C)
So, if we drained 4L at 15C those 4L would expand in an hot car operated at175F or 80C to 4.182L/ 4.55%. Not really that significant. The only constant is the weight. The 4.182L at 80C weigh exactly the same as the 4L at 15C . So if you're taking hot fluid out (that's how most cars coming in) and refilling at ambient temperatures the weight would actually be more important to know.
 

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Not really that significant.
Oh...it can, here's a video of some ATF being heated by stove top alone Wich still won't get close to what Automatics experience in the real everyday world of driving . watch how fluid Volume increases watch 5 mins into video.
 

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4.5% shouldn't be earth-shaking as far as your A/T is concerned...but it is very noticeable in its expansion!
 

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Does anyone know where to buy a Hyundai approved atf fluid besides the dealer? I only use approved atf in my cars, I’ve had bad experiences with using non approved atf’s including valvoline maxlife in transmissions so I stick with OEM approved only.
 

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Check Amazon/ebay or the discounted prices of your local Kia dealership. Mopar and Mitsubishi also had some transmissions that required SP4, SPIV, SP3+1, SP2+2, SP2x2, SP10-6 or whatever they market it as these days, but locally here were just as outrageously expensive as the SP4-m from local Hyundai dealership. I'm content with Aisin, Ravenol, Amsoil, Valvoline, Lubegard, Red Line, LiquidMoly, and equivalent lowviscosity synthetic ATFs.

Check Rockauto for the Aisin fluid.

Problem with silly videos and so-called expansion rates is that it means NOTHING in your specific transmission.
Dipsticks in the old days had cold and hot level marks that were anywhere from 1 to 6" apart based on transmission capacity and sump/pan/case design which is not minimal. And some transmission fluids have different additives, viscosity modifiers, base oils... all at different ratios level critical at the current temp. With a dipstick, I had one transmission that had a 2" level difference when compared at 70F and 200F, and I never bothered to check it at -20 but I know some didn't even read on the dipstick at 'winter Maine' temps. And yes, I am one of the very few that checked ATF dipsticks at the proper hot level check temperature using a gauge or scantool.

It is definitely earth shattering as some transmissions do not tolerate incorrect levels, while others don't mind being a quart high or low. Its just too easy to use a scan tool to get the correct ATF and perfect level. Just do it.

BTW, whether its hot or cold means little, as the weight of ATF that drains should be the same, whether it reads as 4.3 quarts hot or 4 quarts cold. Dipstickless temp levels are taken at an OSHA safe temperature(hint hint). There is at least one automaker that use a vacuum pump setup to take a 'hot ATF' temp. The mild vacuum avoids any HOT fluid from escaping the level check overflow which prevents tech burns.

When I worked for the 'industrial' insurance companies, the 'vehicle' insurance department was hard at work pushing for the elimination of ATF dipsticks. Many fires were caused by overly full cold levels that burped from the vent or dipstick onto overly hot exhaust components causing fires that led to written off vehicles. No dipstick is for YOUR safety, and to prevent the DIY fool or lube jockey from torching your car.
 

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yes I did read some time ago that one of the primary reasons tranny dipsticks were eliminated owing to the reasons you cited. When servicing these trannies it's most important for the vehicle to be completely level when using the check plug method to determine proper fill amount. Not rocket science to service but then again.....
 

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I’ve also read that overfilled transmissions can burp fluid onto hot exhaust components and cause a fire. I also read that manufacturers removed them so customers wouldn’t accidentally get dirt in the system by pulling the dipstick to check the fluid level.
 

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I also read that manufacturers removed them so customers wouldn’t accidentally get dirt in the system by pulling the dipstick to check the fluid level.
...not too sure on that one, why would they care...more money for them?
 

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whether its hot or cold means little, as the weight of ATF that drains should be the same, whether it reads as 4.3 quarts hot or 4 quarts cold. Dipstickless temp levels are taken at an OSHA safe temperature(hint hint).
Im specifically talking about the everyday DYI'r that does his or here's ATF drain & fill at home in there garage/driveway on Level ground . You can't tell me that if You drain exactly 4,4 Liters of Hot ATF fluid that came out of the transmission that your re-filling there after with 4.4 liters of room temperature ATF fluid?? if You are then you have put a little too much in. is my point... anyway??
 

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I’ve also read that overfilled transmissions can burp fluid onto hot exhaust components and cause a fire. I also read that manufacturers removed them so customers wouldn’t accidentally get dirt in the system by pulling the dipstick to check the fluid level.
Dirt is never good, the chance of that happening is slim but possible some minute particle makes it's way in. From what I have heard is manufactures don't want you putting in the wrong fluid. so it's dipstickless. I can say also that's more of an excuse if you ask me. if they wanted there product to last a good long time they would of added a dipstick to check the level & coloure & set a change interval
 

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Oh...it can, here's a video of some ATF being heated by stove top alone Wich still won't get close to what Automatics experience in the real everyday world of driving . watch how fluid Volume increases watch 5 mins into video.
Wow, just saw the video. He went from -18C to 100C that's 118C of difference multiplied by our 0.07% expansion per degree C we. He roughly saw 8.26% increase in volume. That's quite substantial.
 

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Dirt is never good, the chance of that happening is slim but possible some minute particle makes it's way in. From what I have heard is manufactures don't want you putting in the wrong fluid. so it's dipstickless. I can say also that's more of an excuse if you ask me. if they wanted there product to last a good long time they would of added a dipstick to check the level & coloure & set a change interval
“customer error” is what I was getting at. Using the wrong fluid, adding random snake oil additives, and getting dirt or other contaminants in the system.
 

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Eliminating the dipstick fits into their planned obsolescence scheme of things. The avg DYI'er looking at a system without dipstick is far more hesitant to perform a drain & fill. Additionally giving a guy like that the B.S. term as "lifetime fluid" is probably making him feel comfortable not maintaining the system in the first place. Brilliant! Don't have the true stats, but Hyundai knows that probably 90% of the transmissions can make it past 100k without changing the fluid once. If 10% of their trannies fail before 100k miles. That's insignificant, they gladly replace them. Their money is coming from the majority that fails shortly after. People looking at repairs that quickly exceed the value of the car and then end up being lured into the next car deal. Lifetime fluid my a**! There's no such thing.
 
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