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Discussion Starter #1
First, let me explain my plan, then i'll follow with my question. For my Accent's track debut, what I had planned was to buy a head light for it (driver's side.) I was going to separate the lens cover from the back part, and then I was going to drill a 3'' to 4'' hole in that, so that the headlight would be bolted in but would have a large opening. I was going to use that as a ram air funnel (maybe even making a fiberglass surround for it). I would then run my intake right to the headlight's opening as a Ram Air system.

Now, my Celica's computer is very sensitive and can get a CEL just from certain CAIs. So that is why i'm aware that these types of things can cause ECU problems. So, my question is this: If I build a ram air setup and am pushing quite a lot of air through the intake, will that give me a CEL and cause problems, or will the MAP just adjust to take advantage of the increased airflow and lower intake temp?

I know if I attempted to push a bunch of air into my Celica i'd have a problem, but I know the Accent has a different intake computer setup. Any insight is appreciated.
 

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If you already have your intake snorkel removed, it is pretty much a straight shot back from the headlight to the opening of the airbox right behind the battery. you could either run a short tube through there to the airbox, or just run no tube at all and that air will still be blasting right to the airbox for the most part.

this of course is assuming you are planning on running your stock airbox still. you could try it both ways and see how the car reacts (tube, or no tube). I think you are trying something that no one else here has yet. I dont think it should cause you any problems, but I really dont know.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you already have your intake snorkel removed, it is pretty much a straight shot back from the headlight to the opening of the airbox right behind the battery. you could either run a short tube through there to the airbox, or just run no tube at all and that air will still be blasting right to the airbox for the most part.

this of course is assuming you are planning on running your stock airbox still. you could try it both ways and see how the car reacts (tube, or no tube). I think you are trying something that no one else here has yet. I dont think it should cause you any problems, but I really dont know.
This is planned without the stock air box-- it would likely be a custom intake or a short ram with a duct system.

But for the situation i'm really thinking about, I was thinking of making a custom intake which would bring the intake pipe up toward the front of the car, to behind the headlight with a small tube if needed to route the incoming air directly to the intake filter.
 
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Interesting idea. I'm concerned that it will be difficult to measure the gains (or losses) from this mod. Have you worked out a specific test for this?

I guess the best I can think of is to measure and record fuel consumption at WOT starting from a given rolling speed.

Start at say 50mph, then go to WOT and measure fuel consumption over a fixed time period. Log a few runs to get a useful average.

Then do the mod.

Then repeat the test. If fuel consumption at rolling WOT goes up, then you know you're getting more air in and the computer is adding fuel to take advantage of it.

Make sure you note ambient air temps on these runs in case you need to compensate.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Interesting idea. I'm concerned that it will be difficult to measure the gains (or losses) from this mod. [1]Have you worked out a specific test for this?

I guess the best I can think of is to measure and record fuel consumption at WOT starting from a given rolling speed.

Start at say 50mph, then go to WOT and measure fuel consumption over a fixed time period. Log a few runs to get a useful average.

Then do the mod.

Then repeat the test. If fuel consumption at rolling WOT goes up, then you know you're getting more air in and the computer is adding fuel to take advantage of it.

[2]Make sure you note ambient air temps on these runs in case you need to compensate.
1.) I was going to use the worst method of measurement-- the butt dyno. The car being so small and light, I figured i'd be able to feel a difference in acceleration and response.

2.) That's a good idea, and something I can do with the Torque app. And this mod is for track use only, and when i'm at high speed, those temps should get to a low point when the air is moving so fast. (Intake air temp)

I could also go to DB Performance or MAP Performance (Two local performance shops which have dynos) and see how much it would cost to actually log a few runs.
 
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Butt dyno is good, I'm a believer.

In another thread, you were talking about a weight to torque ratio. I got to thinking that it would be useful to weigh every mod done to the car and calculate whether it was earning its keep.

For example, if your car has a 17:1 weight to torque ratio, you cannot improve it unless every single mod has a lower ratio. Thus, every pound added to the car MUST deliver an additional 0.058 ft/lb or better, or else it is better to run without the mod.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Butt dyno is good, I'm a believer.

In another thread, you were talking about a weight to torque ratio. I got to thinking that it would be useful to weigh every mod done to the car and calculate whether it was earning its keep.

For example, if your car has a 17:1 weight to torque ratio, you cannot improve it unless every single mod has a lower ratio. Thus, every pound added to the car MUST deliver an additional 0.058 ft/lb or better, or else it is better to run without the mod.
Well, a lot of mods are just removing one thing to add a different version of said item. For instance, removing the stock intake and air box for a short ram would be similar weight; negligible.

But also, you could make up the weight of one thing by removing another. For instance, if i added strut bars and sway bars, they don't add power, but add weight (along with positive rigidity). However, if i remove the back seat and spare tire when i go to the track, then the weight of the new parts don't really compromise anything because i've lightened up somewhere else. Although admittedly, it'd still be best if weight weren't added at all, then the gain of the weight lost by removing the seat and spare would have greater impact.

But i get your point, but a lot of mods don't weigh all that much. In fact, they tend to weigh less because they tend to be made out of lighter material (Aluminum, Carbon Fiber). That's more the case for the Celica than the Accent, but i think you get what i'm saying.

But you're right, if your mod added weight without a truly beneficial gain in either torque or handling enhancement, it isn't 'worth its weight.'
 
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Consider using a bypass valve rather than a hard bypass. It gets cold where you live, that system will be useful at least a few months of the year.

Apart from that I think it will be a good mod to peak out the power of the stock engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Consider using a bypass valve rather than a hard bypass. It gets cold where you live, that system will be useful at least a few months of the year.

Apart from that I think it will be a good mod to peak out the power of the stock engine.
Oh. Too late, i just finished the bypass just a little while ago. It was not easy to get at the clips which hold the tubes on the nipples.
 

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Ive tried both methods, and to be honest the more air i pushed into the intake the more fuel the computer pushed to balance out the air/ fuel ratio. The car even became a little slugish and so was the response. I found the stock air box with the K&N high flow filter gave me what I was looking for. The Accent runs around 200 degrees and the computer is directly cooled by the air-box and is monitored by itself. If the computer read 245 degrees it will throw a code.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ive tried both methods, and to be honest the more air i pushed into the intake the more fuel the computer pushed to balance out the air/ fuel ratio. The car even became a little slugish and so was the response. I found the stock air box with the K&N high flow filter gave me what I was looking for. The Accent runs around 200 degrees and the computer is directly cooled by the air-box and is monitored by itself. If the computer read 245 degrees it will throw a code.
Heat reduction is my strong suit. I'm going to try a couple things and see how it works out.
 
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The computer is supposed to balance the AF ratio. And if you get more air in, balance means more fuel in, and ultimately more power to the spinny bits.

If you get into a situation that is beyond limits and the computer cannot correct, then you will get weird issues.
 

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temp control sensor

The computer is supposed to balance the AF ratio. And if you get more air in, balance means more fuel in, and ultimately more power to the spinny bits.

If you get into a situation that is beyond limits and the computer cannot correct, then you will get weird issues.

Here is an awsome trick that I use, I rerouted my air intake temp control sensor. to a nice cool spot under the glove box. See the car ilikes cool air around 74 degrees thats why it always runs better at night. I keep my A/c on cause its 105 where I live but the car thinks its 74. + 7-10 hp
 
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Faking out the IAT got invented the day after they invented electronic fuel injection. You get a little extra power as a side effect of running too rich.

It does work, but it comes with a real price too: fuel economy drops substantially, spark plugs foul sooner, increased carbon deposits form, you get more fuel dilution of the motor oil, and the catalytic converter either plugs up or burns up far sooner than it should.

There's no denying that you get a fun little power bump out of it, but it's a ghetto hack best used for throwaway cars or track rats- not something you want to do to a machine you depend on.
 
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