Hyundai Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
655 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello gents,
First post here !
I'm brand new to the forum and soon may be brand new to Hyundai. We're a Nissan family, but the Sonata really caught my eye,, as did the Turbo.

So the wife and I plan to use the car as our commuter, mostly highway whoever has the longest trip (both in sales). We drove the Limited with 17" rims (55 tires), and we both commented on the harder ride than what we're used to. I asked the dealer can I get the Limited with the 16" alloy rims (65 tires) on the GLS, they said no. Another dealer said they can but they may wnat more $$ whcih I won't pay.

So my question.
Does anyone have any experience on which will provide the nicest, quietest highway ride ? GLS vs Limited ? I've learned suspension wise they are identical, so the only ride difference is the tires and rims.
TIA :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,685 Posts
I'm not sure if you drove a GLS as well as a Limited. If not, I suggest you drive a Limited and GLS back to back, on the same roads. The ride isn't much different. I have the GLS (205-65-15 tires and steel wheels) and the ride is compliant but not mushy. My wife has a bad back injury and she is very picky about seat support and suspension compliance. And she likes the GLS more than any car she has owned so far. The Limited is, if anything, a bit softer than the GLS, but I think the suspension settings are the same.

The difference between 17" rims and 215-55s vs 16" rims and 205/65s will be barely detectable. On my Chevy, I swap from 17" (225/50) to 16" (215/60) every winter for snow tires, and the car rides a bit smoother with the 17" wheels. It's because the snow tire sidewalls have a less compliance in spite of being "taller". With modern tire technology, "low profile" tires don't have the harsh ride they used to - at least not until you are under 50 aspect ratio. If the tire looks like a rubber band wrapped around the wheel, it's going to be a rough ride with clumsy steering response. The 55-series tires ride just fine, and going to the 65-series wouldn't offer enough bang for the (very large) buck.

Rather than spend money on 16" rims and different tires (and remembering to swap the TPMS sensors), you may want to see if you find the Limited smooth enough with the stock tires. If not, it is less expensive to keep the rims and replace the OEM rubber with a tire known for providing a smooth quiet ride, like the Goodyear ComforTread or Bridgestone Serenity or General Altimax HP or any of the Michelin touring tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
I'm not sure if you would have to shop around for different dealers but an experience that I had on another earlier car was that I wanted different rims off of a different model and the dealer had sets of the wheels and tires I wanted that they had pulled off of other cars that they put more expensive custome wheels on. They had several sets that they were selling on Ebay. They traded me straight for the wheels and I got what I wanted and they got a more expensive set of wheels to sell.

Maybe there's a Hyundai dealer with cusotm wheels on ther Sonatas and have them to trade. My dealer even took the wheels offf of a Limited and had them black chromed and another set chromed.

You never know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
Never driven the limited, but I have a GLS with the 16" alloy and I thought the ride was ultra mushy. Doubt you are local, but if you are you can always try my 16" and see if you like them better. If so I'd trade you.

Right now they are just taking up space in my garage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,133 Posts
I went from the limited 17" to 18" and didn't really notice muc difference. Sure you feel more bigger bumps but for highways which are usually a lot smoother than city roads think your be fine with any size.

It's strange they didn't want to swap down. The 17" wheels and tires of the Limited costs more so if I was the dealer I would have traded down for free as you always get that one customer who asks about upgrading the wheels to 17". So you trade down and then offer to upsell the next customer to the 17" they take off your car. Or like others mentioned they go to ebay with them and make money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
655 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
QUOTE (DMLexpert @ Oct 28 2010, 11:59 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=367173
I'm not sure if you drove a GLS as well as a Limited. If not, I suggest you drive a Limited and GLS back to back, on the same roads. The ride isn't much different. I have the GLS (205-65-15 tires and steel wheels) and the ride is compliant but not mushy. My wife has a bad back injury and she is very picky about seat support and suspension compliance. And she likes the GLS more than any car she has owned so far. The Limited is, if anything, a bit softer than the GLS, but I think the suspension settings are the same.

The difference between 17" rims and 215-55s vs 16" rims and 205/65s will be barely detectable. On my Chevy, I swap from 17" (225/50) to 16" (215/60) every winter for snow tires, and the car rides a bit smoother with the 17" wheels. It's because the snow tire sidewalls have a less compliance in spite of being "taller". With modern tire technology, "low profile" tires don't have the harsh ride they used to - at least not until you are under 50 aspect ratio. If the tire looks like a rubber band wrapped around the wheel, it's going to be a rough ride with clumsy steering response. The 55-series tires ride just fine, and going to the 65-series wouldn't offer enough bang for the (very large) buck.

Rather than spend money on 16" rims and different tires (and remembering to swap the TPMS sensors), you may want to see if you find the Limited smooth enough with the stock tires. If not, it is less expensive to keep the rims and replace the OEM rubber with a tire known for providing a smooth quiet ride, like the Goodyear ComforTread or Bridgestone Serenity or General Altimax HP or any of the Michelin touring tires.
Thanks guys, you all make some good points.
Physics regarding sidewall height has to lead us to think the 16" GLS is a softer (because of a tall sideall) and quieter (because of a thinner tire) ride than the 17" Limited, right ?

I'm coming with 125,000 miles of experience with my old 2006 Altima 3.5V6 with the EXACT size tire and rim as the Limited, and I hated every seam, bridge transition, gap in the highway, I'm that picky. I now drive a Chrysler 300 Touring, with 215/65/17, brand new GoodYear comfortreads (pillow soft ride). I could have bought the 300C rims 225/60/18, but I wanted the softer/quieter ride.

More food for thought, when test driving these new cars they all have 100% tread. Wait until 30,000-50,000 miles when your less than 50% tread. That's when the Altima really started getting on my nerves. My TicTacs would rattle in a dash compartment....way to harsh. And this was not from the Susupension, cause when I got new tires, it got softer. I'm trying to avoid going down that same road here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
QUOTE (Plasma George @ Oct 29 2010, 01:45 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=367322
Thanks guys, you all make some good points.
Physics regarding sidewall height has to lead us to think the 16" GLS is a softer (because of a tall sideall) and quieter (because of a thinner tire) ride than the 17" Limited, right ?

I'm coming with 125,000 miles of experience with my old 2006 Altima 3.5V6 with the EXACT size tire and rim as the Limited, and I hated every seam, bridge transition, gap in the highway, I'm that picky. I now drive a Chrysler 300 Touring, with 215/65/17, brand new GoodYear comfortreads (pillow soft ride). I could have bought the 300C rims 225/60/18, but I wanted the softer/quieter ride.

More food for thought, when test driving these new cars they all have 100% tread. Wait until 30,000-50,000 miles when your less than 50% tread. That's when the Altima really started getting on my nerves. My TicTacs would rattle in a dash compartment....way to harsh. And this was not from the Susupension, cause when I got new tires, it got softer. I'm trying to avoid going down that same road here.
The larger the sidewall, the more high frequency vibration is absorbed. If you want the quietest wheels, get 16" steel wheels with soft rubber. That usually means getting summer performance tires for their soft compound and having a set of winter tires for when summer tires won't grip. The longer the treadlife, the louder its going to be driving on the road. The sacrifice is shorter tire life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
655 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
QUOTE (dsx724 @ Oct 29 2010, 05:05 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=367368
The larger the sidewall, the more high frequency vibration is absorbed. If you want the quietest wheels, get 16" steel wheels with soft rubber. That usually means getting summer performance tires for their soft compound and having a set of winter tires for when summer tires won't grip. The longer the treadlife, the louder its going to be driving on the road. The sacrifice is shorter tire life.
So it's difficult to poll owners, cause they all love what they have, but what is the general consensus if I want a quiet soft ride ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,685 Posts
QUOTE (Plasma George @ Oct 30 2010, 02:55 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=367543
So it's difficult to poll owners, cause they all love what they have, but what is the general consensus if I want a quiet soft ride ?
I test drove the Sonata Limited at one of the Hyundai Uncensored drives this past September. At the event, they had a Camry and Accord, each with the same basic equipment level. Compared to the Sonata, the Camry was numb and handling was sloppy, feeling like the tires were underinflated. The Accord felt nervous, with a grainy ride, as if the tires were very overinflated. The Sonata had a well controlled ride, with handling that bested the two competitors. The Camry had a smoother ride, but at the expense of tricky handling with smoke pouring off the rear tires during performance driving. The Accord has a firmer ride and the handling suffered as a result, with the front end skittering over the expansion joints in the concrete. Although I already owned a 2011 Sonata before this test drive, I didn't allow that fact to color my opinions. I walked away feeling reassured that I made the right decision.

Although I haven't driven a recent Altima, I can tell you that the auto mags all state that the Altima is not known for a buttery smooth ride - meaning it is stiffly sprung. Your 300 will ride very smoothly in comparison. The Sonata will be somewhere between the two.

If I were in your shoes, I would test drive both the Limited and the GLS, back to back, on a familiar road surface. Compare the two as carefully as you can - radio off, ventilation off, so you can hear any booming, thumps, or other secondary noises as well as tire noise. You may want to drive your 300 on the same course just before, or in between, to keep yourself familiar with its ride quality. Remember that the Sonata is not set up as a luxury car, and that the ride will most definitely be more "active" than the 300 or similar full size car. But the ride and handling blend on the Sonata is calibrated to strike right at the heart of the midsize sedan market - not too firm or soft, and with competent and confident handling.

Remember that if your 300 has the ComforTread tires, it will be smoother/quieter than it would be with its OEM tires, and the Sonata would be smoother/quieter with these same tires installed. You'd want to keep that handicap in mind during the test. And remember that the Sonata and the 300 are radically different cars aimed at different market segments. The 300 compares with the Genesis, not the Sonata, much less the Azera.

If ride quality is the primary criteria, and you don't want or need the extra features on the Limited, you can test drive the GLS. During the evaluation, remember that you can add some extra smoothness to the GLS by swapping on a set of ComforTread tires ($89ea at Tire Rack for 205-65-16) to get the same improvement you noted in your current car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
655 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
/\ you're totally understanding my dilema. Yes, the 300 is what's I've been searching for in ride quality. Heavy car(3900lbs) loaded with sound foam, thick doors, rear wheel drive....all those things make it much different than the Sonata, more like our old Altima.

But the wife and I pound 35,000 miles a year on the highway, and we figure over $100 a month savings at the pump making thes switch. We also have a 2008 Pathfinder for towing my boat, and our 2 small kids, toys, bikes, baseball gear, vacations, etc.

So am I right, to get the best out of the 2011 Sonata, I should press the Dealer for the 16" GLS alloys on a Limited ? Forget look, that was more concern when I was in my 20s, not anymore, and the 17s to 16s look is so minor I'm confident it won't affect resale value. I haven't driven a GLS, and I have a feeling when I do, it's going to be tough to notice a difference since the car is such a different ride type than the 300.

What is the overall opinion on which Sonata gives the quietest, softest highway ride ? (From those who have driven both).
Limited, 215/55/17
or
GLS, 205/65/16
I'm right in saying 215-205=10mm = 1 cm thinner tire for less road noise. (times 4 tires)
17-16 = 1" but really 1/2" more tire between rim and road, the other half is on top. :liebe011:
 

·
Registered
2015 Veloster, 2021 Santa Fe Limited 2.5T
Joined
·
45 Posts
I'm currently driving a (dealer supplied) 2011 GLS with the 16" steel wheels while my 2011 SE 2.0T is in for the recall. I honestly don't think the GLS rides much smoother or softer than my SE with the 18" alloys. I was actually surprised at how well it handles - biggest difference was the somewhat mushy steering response compared to the SE. I agree with others that going from a 17" rim to a 16" rim will not have that big of an impact on the ride quality. I do think that there is probably a bigger difference in ride quality between different tire brands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,685 Posts
As mentioned above, brands of tires will make more of a difference than a half inch of sidewall height or 3/8" of tread width. The narrower tread has the advantage in fuel economy and snow traction, but gives up some cornering capability.

I remember many years ago, when the "wide oval" tires had a harder ride than the usual passenger car tires. The public perception was that a lower aspect ratio meant a harder ride. So a midsize car on H60x15 tires rode like a truck while the same car on F78x14 tires would glide over bumps. But much has changed since those days. Today, car handling is defined by computer software. The spring rate, roll bar, bushings, and tire (via TPC on the sidewall) are all known quantities to the software, and they can change steering precision or ride smoothness with the click of a mouse. A car spec'd with "stiff" tires for better handling may have the spring rate softened a bit to keep the ride civilized while offering riding-on-a-rail steering response. Changing the tires will alter the car's performance beyond the manufacturer's intended blend of ride/handling, but in your case, you want to do that - to tip the balance in favor of ride quality.

My mom has a Lincoln LS and she prizes the smooth ride over all else. For her car, when tire replacement was needed, I bought a set of General Altimax HP. The ride is very smooth and the tire is exceptionally quiet. Why? The sidewalls are very soft. Even with a low profile, the car doesn't thump over expansion joints as it did before. And the tread noise was gone when the old tires were removed. Although I could have gone narrower/taller, the reviews I read on the tire were already stating the tires were doing their job in the stock size, and so I didn't want to sacrifice more handling precision to go further into the smooth ride side of the equation. So without changing the tire size at all, I accomplished the goal of transforming the ride quality by changing the brand of tire.

Because of your specific ride quality preference, I would like to see you err on the side of caution rather than regret your purchase of a Sonata. Try the GLS and Limited - I've driven both, although not back to back - and they both feel the same to me - and focus on the ride and handling of each. You can improve the ride with different tires, but the change will be significant rather than miraculous. So if a Limited is "90% there" in terms of what you want, and the GLS is "92% there", then I'd say that swapping the tires will get you almost to 100% - without changing the wheel rims. If neither Sonata is in the ballpark, then I doubt that new tires or a one inch downsize of rims on the Limited will get you close enough to your goal for you to be happy with the Sonata as a daily driver.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
655 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
QUOTE (kiski @ Oct 31 2010, 09:12 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=367687
I'm currently driving a (dealer supplied) 2011 GLS with the 16" steel wheels while my 2011 SE 2.0T is in for the recall. I honestly don't think the GLS rides much smoother or softer than my SE with the 18" alloys. I was actually surprised at how well it handles - biggest difference was the somewhat mushy steering response compared to the SE. I agree with others that going from a 17" rim to a 16" rim will not have that big of an impact on the ride quality. I do think that there is probably a bigger difference in ride quality between different tire brands.
I appreciate your thoughts, but man I gotta say you must not have much sense for road feel.

I don't care what car it is....go from 225/45 series tires to 205/65 and not notice a difference, let alone the stiffer suspension in the SE ????? Even my wife can notice the ride difference and she's about an oblivious driver as they come....sheesh.

the Dealers are hung up on what the Sticker says, and they'd have to move another set of wheels on a non factory supplied option, or put them on a demo car or something. I was a bit dissapointed as well thinking I'd get a discount !

I guess I'm still unsure. Maybe the 17" will have a nicer look overall, and I could always look to Ebay to make a switch after driving the car for a few months.

I have to drive a GLS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,719 Posts
QUOTE (Plasma George @ Oct 31 2010, 01:09 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=367712
the Dealers are hung up on what the Sticker says, and they'd have to move another set of wheels on a non factory supplied option, or put them on a demo car or something. I was a bit dissapointed as well thinking I'd get a discount !
Dealer mumbo jumbo
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top