Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am getting ready to do the timing belt on my 2002 GLS. It was last done in Apr '05 by the dealer
where I brought it. The car had 59,259 miles. Both the serpentine belt and timing belt were replaced.
Cost was $427 labor - $97.48 and 46.67 for the belts.

The car now has about 125k miles. This time I'm going to do it. This is about the most complex thing I have ever
done on a car. Any guidance, hints, tips, suggestions would be most welcome. I already have the info from
the hmaservice web site. I'm looking more for anecdotal stuff from guys who have done this already. It is as
much to boost my confidence as anything. If anyone has a step-by-step guide that
would help a lot. I'm going to try to document what I do with pictures. Might come
in handy when I have to put things together :)

I'm planning to replace the timing belt, the tensioner pulley, and the idler pulley. I will evaluate the water
pump when I get things apart.

So far I have ordered the parts from HyundaiOEMparts.com. They should be here during this upcoming week.

Part number Part Description Quantity Price Total
2431237500 Engine, Camshaft and timing, Timing belt, Timing belt, sonata - 2.5l 1999-01, 2.7l 2002-05 - 2.5L 1999-01, 2.7L 2002-05 1 $84.11 $84.11
2445037120 Engine, Camshaft and timing, Tensioner pulley, Tensioner pulley, sonata - 2.5l 1999-01, 2.7l 2002-05 - 2.5L 1999-01, 2.7L 2002-05 1 $28.85 $28.85
2481037120 Engine, Camshaft and timing, Idler pulley, Idler pulley, sonata - 2.5l 1999-01, 2.7l 2002-05 - 2.5L 1999-01, 2.7L 2002-05 1 $26.92 $26.92
Sub Total $139.88
Shipping $12.34
Total $152.22

Wish me luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
QUOTE (pjm123a @ Jun 12 2010, 02:26 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=332341
I am getting ready to do the timing belt on my 2002 GLS. It was last done in Apr '05 by the dealer
where I brought it. The car had 59,259 miles. Both the serpentine belt and timing belt were replaced.
Cost was $427 labor - $97.48 and 46.67 for the belts.

The car now has about 125k miles. This time I'm going to do it. This is about the most complex thing I have ever
done on a car. Any guidance, hints, tips, suggestions would be most welcome. I already have the info from
the hmaservice web site. I'm looking more for anecdotal stuff from guys who have done this already. It is as
much to boost my confidence as anything. If anyone has a step-by-step guide that
would help a lot. I'm going to try to document what I do with pictures. Might come
in handy when I have to put things together :)

I'm planning to replace the timing belt, the tensioner pulley, and the idler pulley. I will evaluate the water
pump when I get things apart.

So far I have ordered the parts from HyundaiOEMparts.com. They should be here during this upcoming week.

Part number Part Description Quantity Price Total
2431237500 Engine, Camshaft and timing, Timing belt, Timing belt, sonata - 2.5l 1999-01, 2.7l 2002-05 - 2.5L 1999-01, 2.7L 2002-05 1 $84.11 $84.11
2445037120 Engine, Camshaft and timing, Tensioner pulley, Tensioner pulley, sonata - 2.5l 1999-01, 2.7l 2002-05 - 2.5L 1999-01, 2.7L 2002-05 1 $28.85 $28.85
2481037120 Engine, Camshaft and timing, Idler pulley, Idler pulley, sonata - 2.5l 1999-01, 2.7l 2002-05 - 2.5L 1999-01, 2.7L 2002-05 1 $26.92 $26.92
Sub Total $139.88
Shipping $12.34
Total $152.22

Wish me luck!
I have done a couple of them now. The hardest part about the job is getting the balancer off the crank. It is really torqued on there. Here's a tip, if you want to break the bolt loose, use a cheater bar and socket on the crankshaft bolt and rest the handle of the cheater or breaker bar on the ground towards the front of the car. Try to start the car a couple of times... quick, short bursts. The starter will help break loose the bolt.

There are a few other issues to look out for. There is a hidden bolt or two on the engine mount. You have to feel for it to get it out. Also, there is a bolt holding on the dipstick that has to come off to get the mount off.

The main thing that has to be for sure triple checked, getting the dots on the sprockets lined up with the notches in the heads. When you get the old belt off, make sure you don't bump the sprockets or they will jump and you will have to muscle it back to being lined up. It's under valve spring tension and a **** to move and line up by hand.

Send me a message here if you get a hang up with your number and I can call and talk you thru it if you need some help.

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
OK, The parts are in and I've started the timing belt replacement. I am using as a step-by-step guide, a post
in the sante-fe forum. It is the same engine (2.7L 6 cylinder). So far the wheel is off and the plastic shrouds
are off. No problems yet. Here are the parts
[attachment=18883:p1010001.JPG].
The engine before starting
[attachment=18884:p1010002.JPG].
Cover is off the engine
[attachment=18885:p1010003.JPG]
Wheel cover off and ready to take off wheel
[attachment=18886:p1010006.JPG]
Car is jacked and supported with a stand
[attachment=18887:p1010007.JPG]
The wheel well before taking off the plastic cover
[attachment=18888:p1010008.JPG]
Cover is off, now you can see the bottom of the motor
[attachment=18889:p1010009.JPG]

That's all I had time to do tonight (had to watch the Celtics and Lakers) :)

So far, so good.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,552 Posts
In the last pic, it appears there is layer of white crust between block and A/C compressor ??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The white crust was just some unknown crud. Scraped it a bit with a screwdriver and blew it off with compressed air.
I'll post some more pics later, but I now have completed steps 4 and 5 in the ultimate guide. As the guide indicates, I
can now see the timing belt. It looks generally OK. The teeth seems a little shinier than my new one. It is hard
to tell if it because of wear or maybe a different manufacturer or maybe improvements in the belt?? Who knows??
Anyway, this is clearly a prevention kind of thing. Looking at the belt, I'd guess it could go quite a bit further.

Getting the serpentine belt off was fairly easy. There is a lot of tension on the belt though (watch your fingers). The slot
on the tensioner is for a 3/8 drive. I found it hard to get the tensioner to move with my 3/8 ratchet. I ended up
using a 1/2 ratchet (it was longer so I could get more leverage) with a 3/8 adapter. I did it by myself, but
it would've been a lot easier with a second person. One to take the tension off and another to slip the belt off
a pulley. I ended up getting to it from the top.

The 2 bolts that hold then serp belt tensioner are fairly long (approx 3.5 inches) 12 MM bolts.
I got to both of them from the top.
One is towards the back of the engine and I got it off with closed end socket wrench.
The other is under a pulley and is a bit more difficult to get to.
I got it off with a socket wrench. It is a little tight getting the tensioner itself out of there. I twisted and
turned it a little and got it out through the bottom.

I'm feeling pretty good so far about this. Actually SEEING the old timing belt is pretty cool.

Once again, so far so good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
As promised some more progress and pictures.

Step 4 in the guide calls for removing the serpentine belt.
Here is a picture showing the hole in the tensioner
[attachment=18909:p1010001.JPG]

Next you can see the ratchet in the hole.
[attachment=18910:p1010002.JPG]
Just turn your ratchet to take the tension off.

Step 5 was the tensioner itself.
This what the tensioner mechanism looks like when you get it out.
[attachment=18911:p1010003.JPG]

Now that its off you can see the bare pulleys and the first glimpse of the timing belt.
[attachment=18912:p1010004.JPG]

Step 6 is the power steering pump pulley. This came off just like the guide says.
Here is a pic of it with the nut (19 mm) sitting on top of it.
[attachment=18913:p1010005.JPG]
This is how things look with the pulley removed.
[attachment=18914:p1010006.JPG]

I did not worry about the cruise control module (step 7). It seems there is some controversy on this. I've seen lots
of useful posts from byronguidry3732 saying disconnecting it is not necessary so I'm going with that. If
anyone has some differing thoughts on this, I'm happy to listen.

Step 8 is supporting the engine. I used a block of wood on a bottle jack. Nothing too fancy here.

Step 9 is the engine bracket. I felt much better taking this off knowing that the engine was supported.
It came off surprisingly easy although a breaker bar is a must.
All the fasteners are 17 mm. The 2 bolts on the engine side are approx 2 3/4 inches
long. The one on the wheel well is pointed and about 5 inches long. Here is what the bracket looks like when
you get it out.
[attachment=18921:p1010007.JPG]

Here is where it used to be.
[attachment=18922:p1010008.JPG]

Step 10 is the serpentine belt idler pulley. As the guide promised this came out pretty easily. Of course I dropped
the back plate in spite of the warning. It seems pretty obvious though how it goes on. The back one is basically
the mirror opposite of the front one. Its held on with a pretty funky looking 17 mm bolt that is approx 1 3.4 inches
long. I don't think there is a front and back to this thing. I'm going to put it on though the same way it came out.
Here is a pic of what it looks from the back.
[attachment=18924:p1010009.JPG]

This takes us to step 11 where I've hit my first snag. I've take off the small bolt that hold on the dipstick and 2 larger
bolts. I just can't find any more. All the warnings in this area are true. These darned things
are hard to find. I'm going to try to find a parts diagram to see if I can get some idea of where they are.
I'm not too worried yet, but if I don't get this thing off by the end of this weekend, then I'll start to worry.
Any hints or ideas are most welcome.

So far, not completely good.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
OK, poked around some more and finally got the engine bracket off. What was I doing wrong before? Nothing.
The guide says to remove the top half of the timing belt cover in step 12 after removing the engine bracket in step 11.
On my motor the last 2 bolts are BEHIND the cover. I could have felt around for them forever. They were not exposed
until the upper cover was off. Even then, the lower cover was still hiding the last bolt. After removing one bolt
in the lower cover though, there was enough "play" in the cover to get to the last bolt. Bottom line is that both
the engine bracket and the top timing belt cover are off, but I needed to do them in opposite order.

I don't know if this is just a slight error in the guide or if there are differences in models and years.
In case anyone is following this, I have a 2002 Sonata v6.

Things are looking better although my confidence in the guide being truly a step-by-step kind of thing is a bit shaken.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
QUOTE (pjm123a @ Jun 19 2010, 03:45 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=334475
OK, poked around some more and finally got the engine bracket off. What was I doing wrong before? Nothing.
The guide says to remove the top half of the timing belt cover in step 12 after removing the engine bracket in step 11.
On my motor the last 2 bolts are BEHIND the cover. I could have felt around for them forever. They were not exposed
until the upper cover was off. Even then, the lower cover was still hiding the last bolt. After removing one bolt
in the lower cover though, there was enough "play" in the cover to get to the last bolt. Bottom line is that both
the engine bracket and the top timing belt cover are off, but I needed to do them in opposite order.

I don't know if this is just a slight error in the guide or if there are differences in models and years.
In case anyone is following this, I have a 2002 Sonata v6.

Things are looking better although my confidence in the guide being truly a step-by-step kind of thing is a bit shaken.
You are now getting to the fun part, taking off the crank pulley. Unless you have a big rig impact gun, it's gonna be a bear. Before you take off the crank pulley, make sure you use a socket to line up the timing marks with the notches in the head. Then remove the timing belt tensioner, remove the timing belt from the top half and then take off the crank pulley.

Bumping the starter trick really works if you can't get the impact gun to work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Had some time to do more work today.

The timing marks is step 13 are real easy to find. Just like the guide says.

In step 14 you are supposed to line them up using a socket wrench to turn things clockwise.
I used a 22 mm socket with a smallish breaker bar. I use the breaker bar cause it was a good length
not because you needed much torque. The entire engine turned fairly easily. The socket size is 22 mm.

In step 15 you are supposed to used wd-40. I used penetrating oil.

In step 16, you are supposed to use an impact wrench to remove the 22 mm crankshaft pulley bolt. I can see why.
The entire engine will turn backwards if you try something else. I had an impact wrench that came as part of an
air compressor tool kit I brought at Lowes. It is 1/2 inch. Used this and the bolt did not budge. The motor was
turned backwards slightly as the impact wrench worked. I don't think all the WD-40 or penetrating oil in the
world would've helped. I called my buddy Stan. He has a 1/2 in impact wrench as well. A quick ride
to his place and I picked it up. His is a "husky" model and rated at 500 PSI.
This thing spun the bolt off in about a half second. Now I'm at the point where I need to get the pulley
itself off (step 17). I see the key and tried wiggling. So far it doesn't seem to want to budge. I'm going to search
around and see if there are any tips for getting it off (maybe some kind of puller??). Any ideas would be appreciated!

SuperChris, I'm glad I didn't have to resort to bumping the starter. I think I might be putting a better impact
wrench on my shopping list. Hey, wait tomorrow IS father's day, isin't it?? :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
OK, I've made some more progress and suffered a setback.

This step appears to be quite different for Sonatas (at least mine):
17. Remove the crankshaft pulley. You'll probably need to wiggle it back and forth as you pull it straight off. The more you can wiggle it, the easier it is to come off. The pulley is "keyed" to the crankshaft with a pin (located now at about the 1:00 position). This pin will stay on the crankshaft, and will be what you use to make sure the crankshaft is aligned once you get the new timing belt on.

There is no way that pulley is coming off with your hands. You could wiggle it forever. I had to put a wheel puller on it.
This got it off but unfortunately cracked the edge of the pulley. I'm sure there is a special tool that can be used for this.
My wheel puller was generic. There seems to be quite a bit of confusion on what this thing is called (crankshaft pulley, harmonic
something or other, damper-pulley). Anyway I ordered a new one from HyundaiOEMparts.com. They call it
OEM Catalog
Engine, Crankshaft and bearings, Pulley, PULLEY-DAMPER - 2.5L 1999-01, 2.7L 2002-05
What I like about this site is they want your VIN to make sure you get the right part. So far everything I've gotten
from them is has been right. This part set me back $97.35 delivered to my door. I think it is pretty important though
that this part be perfect since it seems to provide some balance function. What is interesting is that it was cracked
in a few places. I honestly don't think I did it all. Could it have been weakened or cracked when the dealer did the
last timing belt change and they just put it back on????? I mean I COULD do that too. It would work.
Here is a pic of the damage. What do you guys think? Would you re-use this?
[attachment=18936:p1010001.JPG]

On a positive note the belt itself came off real easy even before I took off the tensioner.
I marked it with paint where the cam timing marks were. I intend to use the counting teeth
method when I put the new one on.

On a positive note, the water pump is in fine shape. No sign of leakage and the bearing is nice and tight.
Also, the idler and tensioner pulleys were just fine as well. I replaced them cause I already had the new parts.
I put the old ones in the boxes that the new ones came in and am saving them. I would not hesitate to re-use them.
I don't know if it is cause I change oil religiously or what, but I'm not seeing any signs of excessive wear on anything
(including the belt itself).

One more thing, mu auto tensioner is also different than what the guide describes. It is held on by only one bolt and I don't
see anything that I can compress. Like I said, I was able to get the belt off without even taking it off. I only took it off to
replace the pulley since I had already brought the new one.

Since I'm going to leave the water pump alone, I'm basically ready to start re-assembling.

I guess that means I'm half way done and moving on to step 24.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,552 Posts
QUOTE (pjm123a @ Jun 20 2010, 11:53 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=334650
This step appears to be quite different for Sonatas (at least mine):
2.5/2.7 damper both remove the same, be it Sonata or Santa FE... it falls right off the crank cog, unless the nose of the cog is rusty, making it stuck the damper, along withthe roll pin.. in that case, cut the timing belt, and pull the pulley out enough to get at the cover bolts, and then pull pulley and cover off together, then carefully remove cog from pulley hub and clean off the rust so it freely fits together..

17. Remove the crankshaft pulley. You'll probably need to wiggle it back and forth as you pull it straight off. The more you can wiggle it, the easier it is to come off. The pulley is "keyed" to the crankshaft with a pin (located now at about the 1:00 position). This pin will stay on the crankshaft cog, and will be what you use to make sure the crankshaft is aligned once you get the new timing belt on.

There is no way that pulley is coming off with your hands. You could wiggle it forever. I had to put a wheel puller on it.
This got it off but unfortunately cracked the edge of the pulley. I'm sure there is a special tool that can be used for this.
My wheel puller was generic. There seems to be quite a bit of confusion on what this thing is called (crankshaft pulley, harmonic something or other, damper-pulley).
Depends on how you were taught... crank damper, harmonic balancer, crank pulley, and so forth... the pulley ideally is supposed to come right off the crank cog, yours was stuck with rust.



Anyway I ordered a new one from HyundaiOEMparts.com. They call it --> PULLEY-DAMPER - 2.5L 1999-01, 2.7L 2002-05.

What I like about this site is they want your VIN to make sure you get the right part. So far everything I've gotten
from them is has been right. This part set me back $97.35 delivered to my door. I think it is pretty important though
that this part be perfect since it seems to provide some balance function. What is interesting is that it was cracked
in a few places. I honestly don't think I did it all. Could it have been weakened or cracked when the dealer did the
last timing belt change and they just put it back on????? I mean I COULD do that too. It would work.
Here is a pic of the damage. What do you guys think? Would you re-use this?
[attachment=18936:p1010001.JPG]

You can re-use that, take and radius the edges on the belt side of the break.. been there---done that

On a positive note the belt itself came off real easy even before I took off the tensioner.
Sounds like the wise move will be to replace the tensioner.... especially if the belt was LOOSE...


I marked it with paint where the cam timing marks were. I intend to use the counting teeth
method when I put the new one on.

On a positive note, the water pump is in fine shape. No sign of leakage and the bearing is nice and tight.
Where did you look for leak ??? remember the pic above that I asked about the white crust ?? The pump leaks into a passage in the block,, that in turn dumps out there just above the A/C compressor..... right there where your unknown white crust is seen...

Also, the idler and tensioner pulleys were just fine as well. I replaced them cause I already had the new parts.
I put the old ones in the boxes that the new ones came in and am saving them. I would not hesitate to re-use them.
I don't know if it is cause I change oil religiously or what, but I'm not seeing any signs of excessive wear on anything
(including the belt itself).

One more thing, mu auto tensioner is also different than what the guide describes. It is held on by only one bolt and I don't
see anything that I can compress. Like I said, I was able to get the belt off without even taking it off. I only took it off to
replace the pulley since I had already brought the new one.

Since I'm going to leave the water pump alone, I'm basically ready to start re-assembling.

I guess that means I'm half way done and moving on to step 24.



Here is a 2.7 damper that is seperated - picture at left

Your tensioner you need to compress is the iron cylinder looking thing there at left with 2 bolts holding it to block, and you can barely make out the grenade pin holding the shaft in place to allow install of tensioner to block... need a pin, I gots like 50 or so of them... :banana:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Hi Sbr711. Thank you for your post.

I made a mistake in my last post. When I said:
"mu auto tensioner is also different than what the guide describes. It is held on by only one bolt and I don't
see anything that I can compress."
I was referring to the tensioner pulley, not the tensioner. This is why the belt came off so easy.
The tensioner is as the guide describes held on with 2 bolts. I did use the trick with a c-clamp and a brad.
I actually have the new belt on now and it has just as much tension has the old one did. I do not believe there
is anything wrong with the tensioner.

I am tempted to replace the pump, but I'm going to hold off since I'm basically spending what a new pump would cost
on a new crankshaft sprocket. Now that I've done all this once, I think I can take things apart much faster if the
water pump does go. Also, if the pump goes, it is an inconvenience and a mess, but it's not going to mess things
up the way a failed timing belt would.

Its funny that some people consider a Hyundai I "throw-away" car. Part of me wonders, what would happen if I just let
this go. I'd bet that I could take this belt to 200k. I'm glad I'm changing it, but I don't think I will be in such a hurry next time.
I may go to 200k instead of doing it at 180k. Interestingly enough the new belt has gates written on it. It is clearly different than
the one I'm replacing. I'm thinking that Gates now makes the belts for Hyundai. This belt cam wrapped in a plastic bag
that had Hyundai written all over it. The belt also has the Hyundai logo on it.

One more thing. The setback on the crank sprocket in step 23 did not work for me. When I deliberately set the sprocket off
by one tooth, it stayed that way and I had to do it again with the tooth in the spot where it is supposed to end up.
Instead what I found was that when I pushed the belt over the tensioner pulley in the last step, the left hand (rear) cam sprocket
would move and I'd be off by one tooth. So I deliberately set it off by one tooth. With the belt off, I used a ratchet to turn it
clockwise. I got the result that the guide warns about:
"CAUTION: Be very careful not to rotate the belt at this point as you are taking it off, or as you are putting the new belt on. The reason is because the left top sprocket has its springs in the compressed position (at the top of the hill, so to speak). If you rotate this left top sprocket even one tooth, its compressed energy will cause it to rotate about 8 teeth, taking it out of timing with the crankshaft and the right top sprocket. This is the voice of experience talking. "
Next I turned the sprocket counter-clockwise until it was one tooth forward (clockwise from the timing mark). Now when I pushed
the belt on and it moved, it ended up being right on the timing mark. One full turn of the sprockets showed them to be on their marks
and the crank tooth was on its mark. Incidentally, the edge of the sprocket has a little v-shaped notch that makes it real easy to align with
the mark. You don't have to rely on just the position of the pin.

It is also interesting that when I put the crankshaft pulley on and off a few times to check the timing, it doesn't always come off the same
way. While it is a lot easier to get off now (don't need the wheel puller any more) sometimes just the pulley comes off and sometimes the
sprocket comes off with it. Don't know if this means anything or not.

At any rate, the new belt is on, the marks are all lined up (even after a full turn of the top sprockets.

I'm learning a lot by doing this and want to thank everyone for their comments.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Guys question

How do you recommend fixing the timing if you have had a belt slip and now the timing is out on the 2001 sonata.
or is there a manual or guide that may assist with this
Regards

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Scott, is the timing belt exposed? How do you know that it slipped? Based on what I'm seeing, if it slipped then
there is something wrong with the tension or a pulley or the belt itself. When it is on there, all is pretty snug.
It's hard to imagine how it could slip unless something is loose or broken.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,552 Posts
If it is a 2.4, it'll jump, seen it happen a few times... Hyundai has a service bulletin for some other issue that involves revised upper cover with num inside to keep belt from jumping

Anymore, I do a timing belt on a 2.4, YOU ARE getting a new tensioner, been burned using old tensioner..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
QUOTE (pjm123a @ Jun 20 2010, 05:57 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=334727
Hi Sbr711. Thank you for your post.

I made a mistake in my last post. When I said:
"mu auto tensioner is also different than what the guide describes. It is held on by only one bolt and I don't
see anything that I can compress."
I was referring to the tensioner pulley, not the tensioner. This is why the belt came off so easy.
The tensioner is as the guide describes held on with 2 bolts. I did use the trick with a c-clamp and a brad.
I actually have the new belt on now and it has just as much tension has the old one did. I do not believe there
is anything wrong with the tensioner.

I am tempted to replace the pump, but I'm going to hold off since I'm basically spending what a new pump would cost
on a new crankshaft sprocket. Now that I've done all this once, I think I can take things apart much faster if the
water pump does go. Also, if the pump goes, it is an inconvenience and a mess, but it's not going to mess things
up the way a failed timing belt would.

Its funny that some people consider a Hyundai I "throw-away" car. Part of me wonders, what would happen if I just let
this go. I'd bet that I could take this belt to 200k. I'm glad I'm changing it, but I don't think I will be in such a hurry next time.
I may go to 200k instead of doing it at 180k. Interestingly enough the new belt has gates written on it. It is clearly different than
the one I'm replacing. I'm thinking that Gates now makes the belts for Hyundai. This belt cam wrapped in a plastic bag
that had Hyundai written all over it. The belt also has the Hyundai logo on it.

One more thing. The setback on the crank sprocket in step 23 did not work for me. When I deliberately set the sprocket off
by one tooth, it stayed that way and I had to do it again with the tooth in the spot where it is supposed to end up.
Instead what I found was that when I pushed the belt over the tensioner pulley in the last step, the left hand (rear) cam sprocket
would move and I'd be off by one tooth. So I deliberately set it off by one tooth. With the belt off, I used a ratchet to turn it
clockwise. I got the result that the guide warns about:
"CAUTION: Be very careful not to rotate the belt at this point as you are taking it off, or as you are putting the new belt on. The reason is because the left top sprocket has its springs in the compressed position (at the top of the hill, so to speak). If you rotate this left top sprocket even one tooth, its compressed energy will cause it to rotate about 8 teeth, taking it out of timing with the crankshaft and the right top sprocket. This is the voice of experience talking. "
Next I turned the sprocket counter-clockwise until it was one tooth forward (clockwise from the timing mark). Now when I pushed
the belt on and it moved, it ended up being right on the timing mark. One full turn of the sprockets showed them to be on their marks
and the crank tooth was on its mark. Incidentally, the edge of the sprocket has a little v-shaped notch that makes it real easy to align with
the mark. You don't have to rely on just the position of the pin.

It is also interesting that when I put the crankshaft pulley on and off a few times to check the timing, it doesn't always come off the same
way. While it is a lot easier to get off now (don't need the wheel puller any more) sometimes just the pulley comes off and sometimes the
sprocket comes off with it. Don't know if this means anything or not.

At any rate, the new belt is on, the marks are all lined up (even after a full turn of the top sprockets.

I'm learning a lot by doing this and want to thank everyone for their comments.
Rockauto.com ..... RockAuto.com .... RockAuto.com ... Save yourself serious money when you order from them. They have the same parts and you can choose from different companies of manufacture. Fast shipping and I have never had an issue with return.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,552 Posts
Tiburon this morning.... sure you dont need a water pump -- see pics for "unknown debris"...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Hi sbr711,

Is the white crusty substance by itself enough to indicate a problem? Is there something else I can look out for.
I have not had to add coolant since last summer. There is coolant in the overflow tank and no signs
of a leak. The temp gauge never registers more than half way up the scale.
I live in FL so the cooling system gets a workout. I may start shopping around for a good
price on a water pump just to have one on hand cause you've really got me thinking.

Also, in one of your posts you mention re-using the pulley is OK, but to radius:
You can re-use that, take and radius the edges on the belt side of the break.. been there---done that

In the picture it looks like you have completely removed the shoulder on the belt side of the pulley.
Is that what you mean radiusing? Is that so that the pulley will be better balanced or is there some
other reason for doing that? I take that you do not think it is possible for the serpentine belt to move
off the pulley with no shoulder. Is that because the belt is "ribbed" and held on by the grooves in the pulley?

Thank you for all you advice. I take it you do this for a living? It is great that you help out us DIYers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Following up my own post.

I keep records of all the work I've had done to the car (told you I love that car).
At 87,406 I had the coolant replaced (done by a Hyundai dealer).
They noticed that the A/C evaporator was leaking.
At 88,689 miles I had the evaporator replaced (also by dealer):

Part number description
97607-38000 core and seal assembly
R134A Freon CAN
97619-3D000 filter assy-air

The whole job was $545.

Question: Could this work account for the crusty stuff? Maybe something leaked out as part of that work?
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top