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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2007 Tucson 2.7L

I think I have been mis-reading my maintenance schedule. I thought it said the timing belt was to be changed at 90,000 miles. But today I noticed that the page that lists the tasks is miss-alligned from the milage page. When I assume a different alignment of the list I get some "See Note 5" which says something that is not good english about inspect and ....whatever.

So, can anyone tell me when the belt should be changed? I have 75,000 miles on this belt.

And how hard a job is it? I changed the timing belt in my son's 2005 Elantra and found it pretty simple.

Thanks In Advance,

Pete
 

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it isn't as easy as the elantra 2.0, but it isn't hard, change the water pump and idler and tensioner pulley as well, you can get the whole kit for $158.95 from rockauto get the gates brand one they are the best (don't get dnj) use this code where it says how did you hear about us 6892D28E6E22 and it will take 5% off, a good tip for the timing belt is to use white out to mark the pulleys, crank and timing belt so you know they are right (also use the timing marks then rotate it 2 times after and recheck, the kit comes with instructions, it will take 6 hours or so
 

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It has to be done at 60,000 miles so don't delay! At 75k, you're skating on very thin ice.
 

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It has to be done at 60,000 miles so don't delay! At 75k, you're skating on very thin ice.
bull. i'll believe that when i see the belt.

i'm not saying don't replace the belt, but i wouldn't do so 'without delay' or be too worried. this is a question of statistics, similar to expiration dates on food. the stats give a good idea when any percentage of belts will break. they simply find the point where virtually NONE of them will break and call that the service interval.

so if the OP waits another 5000 miles, the chance of breaking that belt will likely increase less than 1%. kind of like drinking milk the day after it expires. you'll be fine.

that being said, i'd pull the timing belt cover off and visually inspect the belt. very easy to do so why not.
 

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bull. i'll believe that when i see the belt.
Visual inspection is only good for spotting badly deteriorated belts. I've seen belts that look great... except for the point where they failed. Do a Google search for 'broken timing belt' and look at the number of belts that look great, other than where they snapped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks to all.

I hope to get to it soon.

As for where the recomended miles comes from, I am sure it is the old bell curve and they pick off the six sigma point or more.

Thanks Again,

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was doing a little checking on the website and I see it says to remove the power steering pump. Sounds like a messy job. Is it necessary?
 

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I had a 2008 Tucson AWD Limited 2.7 L. And I had mine replaced at 100,000 KM which was in my manual. So, I assume that yours should have been done at 60,000 miles!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My 2007 is at 74,000. I have the RockAuto kit Stevelee recommended. I hope to do the change this weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everyone. Time to pay back for the information and maybe help someone in the future.

I did the change this weekend using the RockAuto kit Stevelee recommended. I used the instructions from the Hyundai website.

Here are a few "things".

(1) The upper timing cover has 8 bolts not seven.

(2) To get the crankshaft pulley off I contemplated using the technique on youtube where they jam a wrench on the bolt and fire the starter. It scared me a little. I decided I could make a tool to hold the crank pulley while I turned the bolt. I had an old lawn mower blade. It had a hole in the center that fit over the pulley bolt. It also had two slots. I put a 3/8 x 1" bolt in each slot with a nut on the "back side". I could arrange the bolts to just fit in the holes in the pulley. Then I put my breaker bar on the pulley bolt and loosened it.

I had a problem keeping the pulley aligned at TDC. It would turn when loosing, then I had to turn it clockwise to TDC which tightened it again just enough to move when trying to loosen. Well, it turned out I have an impact screwdriver. It is only a 12 volt battery type but it worked to take off the (already loosened) pulley bolt without turning it.

I found the dumb thing to be very useful in a lot of cases. Many of the bolts and screws take a lot of turns. If I used a wrench to loosen or do the final tightening this screwdriver made the turning go a lot faster (where there was enough space for it). I say dumb thing because I didn't want to buy it. Sears had some deal. "buy this and that and get the impact screwdriver for free". Serendipity.

(3) To remove the Power steering pump. The instructions for that are wrong. They describe a v-belt pulley and tension adjusting bolt. Ain't no such animal. Just two mounting bolts and a clamp bolt. I didn't have to remove the thing. I just took off the hose from the reservoir and swung the pump out of the way leaving the other line on. There is also an electrical connection of some kind on the pump.

(4) Removing the engine support bracket. They don't tell you that there is a hidden bolt that clamps the dipstick tube to the bracket. After I loosened everything else the bolt was jamming me up. I took it off but with a lot of trouble. And one **** of a lot more trouble getting it on. And it makes aligning the bracket really tough. In retrospect I think it best to just loosen that dipstick tube bolt to give you some play then loosen the bracket. You never have to take the bracket out. Just move it around and slip the timing belt behind it.

(5) I didn't do anything with the camshaft sprockets or camshaft sprocket that the instructions talk about.

(6) My kit came with a tensioner so I didn't have to compress the old one.

(7) I installed the belt and proceeded to reassemble then at some point I discovered that the marks on the camshaft sprockets were wrong. The rear one was two teeth behind. I surmised that as I was installing the belt I pulled something and something turned somewhere.

Luckily I had marked the old belt where the cam sprocket marked teeth fit in the grooves in the belt. I went to the old belt and counted 83 teeth on the belt between the marked cam teeth. I counted off those 83 teeth on the new belt and marked the groove where the marked cam teeth should sit. I use a silver Sharpie, great for writing on dark surfaces.

I wish I had marked the crankshaft sprocket tooth position also. Since I didn't know how many belt teeth there should be between a cam sprocket and the crank sprocket, I installed the belt so that one of the camshaft sprockets matched the mark on the belt and he notch on the cover. I just slid the belt on the other cam sprocket. After verifying that the one cam sprocket was correctly positioned and the mark on the belt lined up with that marked cam tooth, I marked the crank sprocket tooth and the belt. At this point the other cam sprocket was not positioned correctly nor was the mark on the belt lined up with the marked cam tooth. But it was easy to slide the belt off this cam sprocket, turn the cam sprocket until the marked tooth lined up with the mark on the belt and the notch on the cam cover.

Note when doing all this, a few times, as I turned the cam sprocket it would get away from me and rotate 90 degrees or so. I have visions of the valves crashing into the pistons. But maybe not so hard. Hope, Hope, Hope.

Overall, I spent the better part of two days changing the timing belt. Most of the time was having to undo a lot of reassembly when I discovered that the marks were not right. And a lot was spent trying to get the engine support bracket aligned with the bolt holes and fighting the dipstick tube. And then there was time spent turning a lawn mower blade into a pulley holder.

The engine runs fine. Except I think I hear a tick tick tick. Maybe it was always there and I didn't notice.

Thanks again and I hope I helped someone else with this information.

Pete
 

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Pete,

Just a shame that we were both doing this at the same time and didn't manage to hook up. Good write-up.

The left camshaft rotates because of valve spring pressure - you can feel this if you put a wrench on it and try to move it back. You will get it lined up with it's mark (on the casing) after a few tries. An inspection mirror really helps to ensure that the marks are lined up properly.

The worst problem with the dip stick is that by the time you figure it out you have probably bend it a little. It is not possible to bend it back because of it's location. It took me over an hour to get that bolt back in. I ended up using a cargo belt (carefully) around the oil filler cap. The using my mirror, I lined up the hole. I felt a bit stupid using blue-tack in the garage! But hey, it held the bolt in the socket so I could get it in - again using the mirror. The cargo belt works because it is infinitely adjustable. So you can adjust till it lines up.

There is a mark on the crankshaft, you just have to find it first.

Timing belts always scare me but remember to look at the belt (or chain) and estimate the distance between teeth. When you realise this is about 1/4" you will feel a bit more confident that you have got it on the right tooth.

I replaced the PS pump also. If you buy the one without the inlet manifold you need to remove this before removing the pump. If you try to remove the output line first, you have a good chance of breaking this.

I also managed to break my drive belt tensioner. This a truly stupid design - I have ordered a replacement from RockAuto. The Dayco version looks to have a better design. I am hoping it will take the pressure better. There is more metal around the socket hole - in the pic anyway - here's hoping! I am thinking it may be worth making a tool for this - maybe just a couple of bolts in a steel bar would do it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
(1) Yep, I used the mirror in about a dozen places during the job.
(2) I spent about 2 hours on the dipstick tube. I finally took the bracket off and got the tube bolt started from underneath. Then left it very loose and reinstalled the bracket. Then tightened the dipstick tube bolt.

(3) The crankshaft mark I used (at first) was from the roll pin to the notch on a large washer against the back plate. That was also aligned with part of the casting (if I recall correctly). But I was concerned that I get the right number of belt teeth between the two camshaft marks and from one camshaft mark to the crank pulley. If that is right, the number of teeth from the other camshaft to the crank pulley has to be right. I believe that when I was pulling on the belt to get it in position, the crank pulley rotated a tooth or two.

So I set the 83 belt teeth between the two camshaft marks on the frame (not the marks on the teeth yet) with the belt already on the crank pulley. Then I made a mark on the crank pulley and a corresponding mark on the belt.

So now I have three marks on the belt, one that says which tooth of the belt lines up with which notch on the crank pulley (with the pulley properly rotated). One that lines up with the notch on the front cam mark on the frame and the third in a similar alignment with rear cam. Now all I need to do is slip the belt off one cam and turn it to line up the marked cam tooth to the mark on the belt. Then the same for the other cam.

Maybe I'm not describing this well. I get the feeling if I try more I will just bore everyone. Basically, doing it this way enabled me to know which belt groove should fall on the correct cam and pulley tooth.

(4) That is a bummer about the tensioner. I guess you mean the hole where the 3/8 drive fits broke out. I guess I was lucky. I had to put a pipe on my 3/8 "breaker bar" to get the belt off. I didn't need the pipe to get it on however. But I could have easily had the same problem.
 

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Funny! My first reaction was that my tensioner was WAY too tight. But when I checked with my parts supplier they said about 120 lbs, or more.

I needed about 2 1/2 feet of bar to move it enough to get the belt off/on. Then The PS pump rattled so I had to try to get it off again. Broke it trying to get the new belt off!

I'm interested to see if the replacement is as tough to operate! It's in transit.
 
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