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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Preface

Long story short, I wanted a quieter car. So I dug around and learned about soundproofing.

Soundproofing has two facets. The first is damping: vibrations and echos must be reduced. To do this one needs what's called a constrained layer damper, or CLD. It's a heavy sheet of rubber or bitumen with an aluminium foil on one side and an adhesive sheet on the other side. This is what "Dynamat" is.

The other facet is absorption. CLD by itself doesn't absorb much sound, if at all. For sound absorption one would need something like foam or a quilted fabric/fibre pad. This material would be layered atop the CLD for maximum effectiveness.

Also this corona confinement thing is making me get cabin fever so I needed to do something.

Materials

Since I can't afford the name-brand stuff, I bought "Noico" products from Amazon.
I also bought a roller tool. Since I didn't want to scratch or damage anything, I splurged and bought the Dynamat heavy roller, which has a weighty rubber wheel. I figured the rubber won't scratch or damage anything.

And yes, I'm using a Dynamat tool to apply one of their competitors' products. Oh the irony.

In order to attempt this one would also need:
  • Nice warm weather
  • A stool or low chair, or channel your inner Slav and squat
  • Plastic panel tools
  • Heavy scissors or big box cutter
  • Cleaning agents such as rubbing alcohol or white spirit, and rags to go along
  • Small, thin, flathead screwdriver
  • Large long Philips driver, #2 head
  • A 10mm socket and socket extender, or a deep socket
  • Hyundai panel clips
  • A few hours of time
  • A buddy to help you out
  • Good pain tolerance and have no fear of seeing blood (more on this later)
Panel clips

Now I only did the four doors and the tailgate (sort of). I saw three different clips:
  • 82315-33020, a sky blue clip
  • 82315-2W000, a grass green clip
  • 82315-27000, a bluer-blue (like lapis lazuli) clip
These clips have the same basic shape and only vary in their dimensions by a millimetre or so. For all I know they're interchangeable. Either Hyundai analysed the panels to such an extent that they came up with the absolute best type of clip for a given location, or they're just screwing with DIYers. I will never know.

You might be able to sweet-talk your dealer's parts department to give you a couple, or buy a few for less than a dollar each.

Panel removal

These are not my videos.
Make sure you use plastic panel tools and not a screwdriver like Ed (the man in the video) does. Be firm, but gentle. But firm. Like milking a cow. Do it right and you won't break any clips. Out of the several dozen clips I only broke one, and that was during reattachment.

Application - front door

Enough talk. Time for pictures.

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This is the front door with the door card (trim panel) removed. Have a buddy hold the door card during detachment and reattachment so you can operate all the connectors. Press hard on the release switches and wiggle.

You might have seen in the videos that the back of the door card has some sort of fibre pad attached. This is probably Hyundai's excuse for door insulation. I kept it there because it's heat-welded to the door card. If you pull it off then you'll have to glue it back on. That or apply these products you just bought.

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This is the front door with CLD applied. Here comes the pain and blood part. If you don't wear gloves (I didn't because I needed dexterity) then you will almost certainly cut yourself with the CLD. The aluminium foil edges act like little razor blades and boy it really doesn't take much pressure to cut yourself. It's actually not as bad as paper cuts since the foil edges are smooth. I used to be in the Army so small cuts are basically a part of life.

Keep any oddly-shaped tailings and apply them to cover any gaps or small voids.

Also you don't need to cover every square inch. From what I've read, 60% to 75% coverage is enough.

Take a roller (like the heavy rubber one I bought) and roll the CLD strong and hard. The diamond pattern will never completely go away. Don't worry about it. Two or three good passes are enough. Make sure the edges are also rolled down.

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This is the front door with the foam applied. Use the roller too. Turns out "Noico Red" isn't red. Oh well, no Communism for today. You might be tempted by Noico's thicker, 315 mils foam panels. Don't. The reviews are right - the adhesive on these panels aren't super strong. Thicker foam panels will only be harder to work with. If you don't feel good with a single layer then you could double or even triple the foam panels!

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This is how you reattach the door card. Work from top down and make sure that the "lip" at the top back of the door card fully mates with the groove in the window seal rubber strip.

Line up the clips with their holes and push the door card back in. Note the positions of the clips and slap the door card with your palm. Slap it strong and hard, but not so much that you break a clip like I did.

Application - rear door

The same explanations and comments apply here.
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Application - tailgate

To quote Anakin Skywalker: This is where the fun begins.
Pay attention. These instructions show a manually-operated tailgate. If you have an automatic tailgate like I do, be extremely careful when removing the trim panel because the "close tailgate" button is held onto the trim panel by three teeny-tiny wedges or lugs about half a millimetre thick each. Pull the panel off willy-nilly and you're going to break at least one of these wedges like I did. Fortunately I had some strong tape, but Hyundai really should have reinforced this button.

To prevent sadness, you need to reach around and undo a connector. Have a buddy hold the panel in place, as usual.

Also the tailgate handle might not come off like it does in the instructions. Don't force it.

Since the tailgate is motorized, I didn't want to apply any CLD because I didn't want to put undue stress upon the motors.

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Finishing touch

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Yes I put a Dynamat sticker on my Noico-equipped car. Whatever. It came with the roller and it's a nice sticker. Somebody ought to make a sticker that says "my car keeps all the noise out of the cabin and darn right it's quieter than yours". Or some such.

Road test

At urban speeds, with the windows up, all I hear is engine and tire noise. It's kind of crazy. This is probably what an S-Klasse or a 7-Series is like from the inside. I have yet to bring the car onto a highway.

Next steps

Maybe I'll buy a sheet of Dynamat hood liner and do the hood. These Noico products are NOT meant for under hood use.

Maybe one day I'll remove the dashboard and do the firewall. The floor is actually decently insulated. Hyundai put some thick multi-layer felt there.

Thanks for reading! (y)
 

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WOW, awesome work and Thanks for sharing pics as well. I like to do appearance mods to this XL and I just use it for work so couldn’t care less about sound. Just like any Kia/Hyundai vehicles, they’re loud and annoying. I just crank up the music and ignore it


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Discussion Starter #3
Just like any Kia/Hyundai vehicles, they’re loud and annoying.
The XL is really quiet compared to my old Dodge Caliber, which my old dad is still driving. He's the "I don't want computer gizmos in my car" sort of guy. I wanted to do his car with all my leftover materials but he vehemently denied it. Guess his hearing works just as well for soundproofing!
 

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Great and detailed write up, I am guessing with that detail
you would have mentioned any pre and post Db measurements taken?

I did not think my SF was all that noisy, now I best listen more attentively!

Great Job
 

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No of course not
but
There's an app for that!

I use this one, none are as accurate as a real meter, but for a novice....

Sound Meter
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The bass is a lot less flabby now, which is a good thing since I could never stand the shaky and rattly kind of bass that ricers so love to do with their old rusty Civics.

On the highway it's mostly low-frequency noise coming in from the floor of the vehicle. Maybe I'll pull the chairs and put CLD on the floor too.

Also this is how to remove the dashboard (Hyundai calls it a crash pad): Hyundai Santa Fe: Components and Components Location - Crash Pad - Body (Interior and Exterior)

I'm not doing that.
 

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Great write-up.

A few questions:
1) Did you do any before/after soundmeter (decibel) measurements? I have a pro-calibrated analog one for my home theater system, but I used that to check/calibrate the soundmeter app for my iPhone. I then used my iPhone app when I did the test drives for my 2017 SFS 2.0 T Ultimate AWD. Just curious to know how much it made a difference.

2) Did the stuff come with the instructions on where to place the materials? Or the pictures are just where you figured it would be able to be attached? I'm mostly curious as to the "open spots", but without much knowledge, I don't know. I do know I took the door panel off one time to try to get to the wiring and then decided it was going to be a nasty thing and didn't bother. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #9
A few questions:
Great questions.

  1. Subjectively, it's quieter. Objectively, I don't know, because I don't have a calibrated SPL meter. I tried three different phone SPL programs and I got three results. "Measurements" produced by programs of dubious quality using uncalibrated hardware is worthless. Even the cheapest SPL meter that I could find is $100 and it just goes from there. Ideally I'd use whatever instruments NVH engineers use.
  2. I searched "car soundproofing" and there are numerous videos and pictures out there. I basically followed some of them. The Noico materials come with instructions, or you could visit their website for more details. Door panel removal really isn't that scary especially if you have the right panel tools or are willing to sacrifice a few clips. See the videos in my original post for more.
Glad you enjoyed my write-up!
 

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Great questions.

  1. Subjectively, it's quieter. Objectively, I don't know, because I don't have a calibrated SPL meter. I tried three different phone SPL programs and I got three results. "Measurements" produced by programs of dubious quality using uncalibrated hardware is worthless. Even the cheapest SPL meter that I could find is $100 and it just goes from there. Ideally I'd use whatever instruments NVH engineers use.
  2. I searched "car soundproofing" and there are numerous videos and pictures out there. I basically followed some of them. The Noico materials come with instructions, or you could visit their website for more details. Door panel removal really isn't that scary especially if you have the right panel tools or are willing to sacrifice a few clips. See the videos in my original post for more.
Glad you enjoyed my write-up!
Thanks for the info! Maybe I'll give it a whirl with all the time off I'm building up. LOL
 
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