Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Very impressed . Rode well considering it likely had inflated tires of 40 or more . Went 27 miles of mixed driving with 2 people . Actual gas mileage could hover around 41 if calculated , that's if off by 4 m.p.g. like that of our '18 ACCENT SE with 6 speed auto .
IMG_3255.JPG
IMG_3256.JPG
IMG_3257.JPG
IMG_3258.JPG
IMG_3259.JPG
IMG_3260.JPG
IMG_3261.JPG
IMG_3265.JPG
IMG_3268.JPG
IMG_3270.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
So dish the dirt: What is your opinion of the CVT? The Accent has the same transmission as the Elantra, so your judgement is valuable since you've spent some seat time in a car with the 6 speed.

Would you opt for the CVT over the 6 speed if you had a choice of one or the other?

Do you have any complaints or compliments about the programming and/or performance of the new CVT?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The C.V.T. was smooth and had plenty of zip . Used the Eco , Normal ( most of drive ) , and Power settings . Seemed to coast better than the 6 speed auto of the Accent . We had a 2006 Prius , so C.V.T. is good by me .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
The C.V.T. was smooth and had plenty of zip . Used the Eco , Normal ( most of drive ) , and Power settings . Seemed to coast better than the 6 speed auto of the Accent .
I haven't driven one with the new CVT/IVT yet, but I found the idea of creating shift points for the CVT so it mimicked a six speed automatic interesting. Does it effectively do that in your experience? Also I understand there are still drive modes, such as Sport and Eco. Is that accurate and have you tried the modes to see how they effect driving? TIA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Very similar performance to the 6 speed auto. This video is detailed. 31 minutes of input.
That's a pretty good review. Talk about the CVT transmission starts at around the 20 minute mark. The simulated shift points seem to do a good job of mimicking a 6 speed automatic. It would have been nice if they had reviewed an Elantra with the limited or sport trim so we could have seen more of the high tech features.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
I hope long term long term the CVT is bullet proof.
Second that.
So far my 17 E Ultimate's 6-speed has been the best auto I've ever had in a car- smooth shifting and always seems to be in the proper gear. And it has a reputation for longevity, which is something that most CVT's lack (at least so far).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
666 Posts
Still not sure why you would want a cvt to simulate a normal transmission. It seems like it would be better for it to be extremely smooth. With no shift points.

Sent from my Galaxy S10
Manfuacturers have found that when it does not simulate a normal transmission, people who are used to driving cars with a normal automatic transmission are put off by it. Even though the CVT is maximizing the performance for any given level of throttle and speed, people wanted it to have a more familiar feel. So manufacturers started programming in simulated "shift points." It doesn't make sense, but people liked them better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
310 Posts
Even though the CVT is maximizing the performance for any given level of throttle and speed, people wanted it to have a more familiar feel. So manufacturers started programming in simulated "shift points."
It would be interesting to know if there's much of a performance trade-off caused by simulating shift points?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
Manfuacturers have found that when it does not simulate a normal transmission, people who are used to driving cars with a normal automatic transmission are put off by it. Even though the CVT is maximizing the performance for any given level of throttle and speed, people wanted it to have a more familiar feel. So manufacturers started programming in simulated "shift points." It doesn't make sense, but people liked them better.
They learned quickly over the last 20 years as the CVT matured. In its natural state, the CVT will allow the engine to rev to peak torque and hang there while the speed of the car catches up. But that feels like a transmission that's slipping and failing.
Many years ago, my wife had an old Saturn Vue with the CVT. I used to call it the "Vue Red Line" because that's where the tach went whenever you buried the gas pedal. Fortunately it had a good radio, so we never heard much from the engine room. I must be lucky - our Hungarian Death Menace (aka Saturn VTi) was perfectly reliable and very efficient.
It would be interesting to if there's much of a performance trade-off caused by simulating shift points?
There is a minor trade-off in ultimate efficiency with the fake shifting, but Hyundai dials in 8 shift points so the engine rpm isn't deviating too far from peak torque during each "shift".
I would prefer an extra entry in the quadrant below D. For fake shifting, choose "D" for "[email protected]" - preferred for clueless owners who think the transmission is slipping instead of working as designed. Below that, give us an "E" for Eco or Efficiency, where it will offer the "angry food processor" soundtrack at higher throttle angles but offer peak mpg and acceleration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Not too much off topic, I hope. Seeing comments about shift points and durability made me wonder, I manually shift my 6 spd automatic (2017 Elantra Limited) sometimes, often decelerating like I used to do when I still had a real stick shift. Is there much of an increased wear factor on the transmission, especially using it for the engine braking effect?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
Not too much off topic, I hope. Seeing comments about shift points and durability made me wonder, I manually shift my 6 spd automatic (2017 Elantra Limited) sometimes, often decelerating like I used to do when I still had a real stick shift. Is there much of an increased wear factor on the transmission, especially using it for the engine braking effect?
Nothing worth worrying about. On decleration, the actual torque through the gearbox is far less than when accelerating. And the transmission will downshift sequentially anyway, at least until it gets to 3 and then drops directly to 1. So you're not saving any shift sequences by requesting downshifts manually. Left to its own brainpower, the computer will shift until it eventually reaches first gear when the car stops.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
I was thinking more specifically about clutch pack wear. There's a downhill twisting stretch zoned for 35, but locals rarely go that slowly. I like to drop down to 4th, 3rd and maybe 2nd as the curve radius changes. Brings the revs way up, good engine braking, and even so I'll often have to use the brakes briefly. I'm assuming clutch packs similar to the ones I used to work with decades ago...:sneaky:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,475 Posts
I was thinking more specifically about clutch pack wear. There's a downhill twisting stretch zoned for 35, but locals rarely go that slowly. I like to drop down to 4th, 3rd and maybe 2nd as the curve radius changes. Brings the revs way up, good engine braking, and even so I'll often have to use the brakes briefly. I'm assuming clutch packs similar to the ones I used to work with decades ago...:sneaky:
Coasting stresses the transmission far less than accelerating. The computer won't allow the selection of a gear that would cause any harm - it will just ignore the movement of the lever.
There are some hills I drive that are fairly steep - like the eastern mountains heading down into Scranton or Wilkes-Barre. For the most part, 4th will keep you safe from the fuzz, and 3rd is better for heavier traffic. No ill effects from engine braking.
The clutch packs are about the same as they've always been. A couple of them use wave springs and a couple use the old coil setup. Shifting involves swapping one clutch pack (one releases as the other applies) while one stays engaged so there's little shock to the driveline during any shift.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
They learned quickly over the last 20 years as the CVT matured. In its natural state, the CVT will allow the engine to rev to peak torque and hang there while the speed of the car catches up. But that feels like a transmission that's slipping and failing.
Many years ago, my wife had an old Saturn Vue with the CVT. I used to call it the "Vue Red Line" because that's where the tach went whenever you buried the gas pedal. Fortunately it had a good radio, so we never heard much from the engine room. I must be lucky - our Hungarian Death Menace (aka Saturn VTi) was perfectly reliable and very efficient.

There is a minor trade-off in ultimate efficiency with the fake shifting, but Hyundai dials in 8 shift points so the engine rpm isn't deviating too far from peak torque during each "shift".
I would prefer an extra entry in the quadrant below D. For fake shifting, choose "D" for "[email protected]" - preferred for clueless owners who think the transmission is slipping instead of working as designed. Below that, give us an "E" for Eco or Efficiency, where it will offer the "angry food processor" soundtrack at higher throttle angles but offer peak mpg and acceleration.
IMO that GM/Saturn CVT was awful, but I'm thankful I had it in my 2003 VUE. I used the settlement as a down payment on my house. :).
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top