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any body else having issues with suspension when it gets really cold like -20 , mine feels like there's no struts , every bump the suspension bottoms out
 

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Thank God we don't get THAT cold down here in SC.
I did noticed that in our "cold", only 28, the shocks felt very stiff. Almost like they were the adjustable type and on full hard. THAT is what you should have felt.
Could be wrong but unless you blew the seals on all four shocks and the fluid/gas all leaked out there is no way, at -20, could the shocks bottom out. If you did the front end would be bouncing like a ball over bumps.
 

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No problem here either.

Even though it was -8°F (-22°C) here in Chicago, and I haven't driven it since Wednesday last week.

Not to mention, she fired right up, no hiccups :p
 

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its the same with rear hatch struts, that either move too slow(oil ones), or refuse to stay up(gas ones).
oils get very-very dense in those temps and the piston has a harder time compressing and rebounding. gas suspensions can start to sag in the cold, and rebounding can start to feel like riding on rocks.
 

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I agree with ImStricken. It's not your SFS "bottoming out", it's just that they're so cold - there's no give to them... you'll feel every little bump until they warm up a little from use. No way around it... unless you move to Arizona.
 

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Quite different model in different climate - my CM Santa Fe has the self-levelling rear dampers and I notice the rear is very stiff as the temperature drops, in our case around 5C (41F), but it's normal within a mile.

It's not something I ever noticed on previous GM or Subarus.
 

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Quite different model in different climate - my CM Santa Fe has the self-levelling rear dampers and I notice the rear is very stiff as the temperature drops, in our case around 5C (41F), but it's normal within a mile.

It's not something I ever noticed on previous GM or Subarus.
is your's air, or hydraulic? (the self leveling system that is).
 

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is your's air, or hydraulic? (the self leveling system that is).
Hydraulic - it's self-energising self-levelling - similar in principle to the Boge Nivomat where the movement of the suspension is used to pressurize a hydraulic reservoir which is then used to keep the ride height consistent - Subaru also use a similar system on Outbacks with self-levelling.

The self-levelling dampers are just fitted in place of conventional dampers - but they aren't cheap and only warranted for 60,000 miles despite the unlimited mileage warranty for the UK.
 

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Hydraulic - it's self-energising self-levelling - similar in principle to the Boge Nivomat where the movement of the suspension is used to pressurize a hydraulic reservoir which is then used to keep the ride height consistent - Subaru also use a similar system on Outbacks with self-levelling.

The self-levelling dampers are just fitted in place of conventional dampers - but they aren't cheap and only warranted for 60,000 miles despite the unlimited mileage warranty for the UK.
do you know if they are in a sealed pressurized system or a motor/pump style system?
 

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Not really concerned with the shocks, struts and comfort.

I'm just glad we've got VSM, I'm to busy swerving, dodging, hard braking, hard cornering and looking 3/4's of mile in front attempting an escape route around all the danged pothole's in our roads ..... :evil:

We need the Corps of Engineers to get some pontoon bridges over a couple of the one's around here ..... :eek:
 
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