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I snapped a couple studs and need to replace them, anyone know or has a DIY on this? I searched already, came up with a thread but not alot of info. Thanks!
 

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I seem to recall this being discussed before and the slot or hole that is used to feed the lug through on most every other manufacturer isn't there on the 10/11 builds. Not sure after that. You have to drop the knuckle I believe. I think sbr had a suggestion so you might want to search on him.
 

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I snapped a couple studs and need to replace them, anyone know or has a DIY on this? I searched already, came up with a thread but not alot of info. Thanks!
You will have to remove the brake rotors for access. The backing plate usually has an area (cut out) that will allow the removal/installation of the wheel stud... Removal is as simple as tapping them out, then reinstall the new ones with the aid of a lug nut. The nut is used to draw the stud into the hub.
 

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You will have to remove the brake rotors for access. The backing plate usually has an area (cut out) that will allow the removal/installation of the wheel stud... Removal is as simple as tapping them out, then reinstall the new ones with the aid of a lug nut. The nut is used to draw the stud into the hub.
Yup, thats what we believed. However I think there is a drawback to our design where you can punch it out, but the hole/cutout had enough angle of deflection you cant put the new one back straight in.

I am searching now but I am not seeing what I remember.
 

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Stud Extraction

I read the OP and was composing this response while you the 6 responses came in clarifying that it was wheel studs. The below is for threaded studs not the pressed in wheel studs. Maybe useful for somebody.


In my experience stud extraction can either be a piece of cake or a real ball buster. The main thing it depends upon is access to the stud and what's left of it. No mater what get some good penetrating oil (kroil, liquid wrench, PT blaster or old school methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen)) on it and let it soak.
  1. UNSCREW THE STUD If it is in wide open spaces and some of the stud is protruding (1/4" or more) a pair of vice grips can be used or one of those cam type stud extractors (Sears, Harbor Freight) may work.
  2. EASY OUTS If less than ~1/4" and still some working space is available use a moto-tool (Dremel or equivalent) with a grind stone/cut off wheel and cut/grind the end of the stud flat and perpendicular to the centerline of the stud. Use a center punch find the center of the stud and make an indentation. If the flat surface you made is in the threaded section of the stud make sure you compensate for the thread helix. You want your indentation to be in the center of the stud not the offset center caused by a thread crown and a thread root. Typically you would try to use the largest sized Easy out that will fit the stud size (these are available from almost any auto parts/tool store). On the side of the easy out there will be a required drill size for the hole necessary for the easy out. I found it is much easier and have had more success by starting with a much smaller dia bit. I usually start with a 1/16" or a 5/64" bit and work my way up in 1/16" steps I'm at the easy out recommended size. The trick is to ensure the original hole is straight down the centerline of the stud. DON'T force the drill let the bit do the cutting, pull the bit several times to clear the hole of turnings, use some cutting oil or other lubricant on the bit to cool it. Make sure you drill deep enough so the easy out will not bottom out (if possible drill completely through the stud). Now when you replace the bit with the next 1/16" size up the drill will reach the bottom of the stud very quickly and with very little pressure. Once at the easy out required hole size insert the easy out and if its a good day the stud will come out.
  3. WITHOUT AN EASY OUT Do all the steps of item 2. down to the part of using an easy out but continue increasing the hole size in 1/16" steps until the stud is only a tube with a wall of ~5/64". Use a center punch or pinprick punch and tap the side of the stud. This should collapse it and you should be able to remove the stud using needle nose pliers. The heat from all the drilling and the penetrating oil should have loosened the stud.
  4. A REFINMENT ON DRILLING OUT STUDS Left hand drill bits (http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/NTESearch?storeId=6970&ipp=24&Ntt=left%2Bhand%2Bdrill%2Bbits). Use standard right hand bits to start the hole and then switch to left hand bits (must have reversible drill) and continue to increase hole size if you are lucky the heat and penetrating oil may loosen the stud enough that it may just spin out with the left hand bit.
  5. OH NO I SCREWED UP THE THREADS!!! Get a HELICOIL or equivalent insert kit for the size you need. A typical kit comes with the required dill bit, male thread tap, insertion tool and several thread inserts. HELICOIL and others are available in UNC, UNF and Metric. Most Auto Parts stores carry them or Google them.
Like I said at the beginning the biggest problem is access to the stud. Sometimes surrounding stuff needs to be removed or the part itself (if possible) removed to get more elbow room.

Go slow and easy.

Make sure you find the center of the stud.

Make sure you are drilling down the center of the stud.

Don't force the drill.

Make sure the hole is large enough and deep enough for the EASY-OUT.

Although changing drill bits every 15 seconds (that's right - after the first hole is drilled through the stud the next 1/16" increase goes real fast) the ease of increasing the hole size is easy.

Good luck.
 
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