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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone! Last night I hopped in my car only to find out the car would not turn anywhere past the ACC position. First before anyone mentions it the steering wheel was NOT locked! Continuing on, the key would turn to ACC power but no further and I tried everything I could possibly think of. Unplugged the battery, jiggled the gear shifter, stuck the key in fast to make sure it was going in all the way, even let the car sit for about 20 minutes. Nothing. I have noticed previously one time when I was going to work that the key came out in between the actual ACC position and the off position (radio and the clock were still on) I was able to stick the key back in but it took me a couple minutes to get it to the off position. The car is approaching 150k miles and I'm assuming that it's still the original key came with the car in 2013. Just wanted to see if you guys had any recommendations on what I should do. Should I try getting a new key? Is there a certain place that would be cheapest to get a key cut? Is the key chipped? If it is chipped could I just get a cheap metal key cut at lowes and just keep the chipped one on my key chain?

Car info:
2013 Hyundai Sonata GLS
 

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It's not chipped, go to a locksmith if they have a computer controlled cutting machine, as it will correct for wear.
 

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My two cents....I'm speaking from experience on other cars as I am not familiar with the Sonata.
If the key turned easily to the ACC position if follows that there is nothing really wrong with the lock/key portion. Perhaps the electrical ignition switch is jamming up. Usually disassembling the ignition lock is not difficult, but a good key is required to turn the assembly to the on position or you can't access some of the fasteners.
I would try a new or different key just because it is the cheapest and easiest route to take but I suspect there is another problem. Let us know how this works out.
 

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Along those lines of thought, take apart steering column and disconnect the ignition switch from the lock cylinder

If the key then turns easily then check the switch
If switch turns easily then something between is jammed

If the key does not turn then ignition lock needs work.
A locksmith can replace cylinder and re-key it for same key
Also, do not forget to check the switch just in case

Good luck
 

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At 150 k it could be just a worn out tumbler . I’ve had to replace a couple others over the years usually about that mileage though older in years.
I’d try a tad of graphite lock lubricant and see if it is still snaggy. If the cuts on the key are still sharp that’s the more likely situation. Worn keys like on my 2000 GMC really look ROUNDED. Not sure Hyundai but with the typical column setup you can pull the tumbler easily by key all the way in and sticking a paper clip ect in the tiny hole. The position it comes out at is ??? but you’ll figure it out. You can probably get a new one at a lock Smith or on line. Who knows one tiny hunk of plastic may have fallen in and it will be fine once removed, ya never know.
FYI the typical cause for sticky worn tumblers as well as many car fires is nothing more than time and one more thing. A fist sized wad of bling, massive key chains, deco trolls and huge fobs all swing dangling around. Given time that raises Caine with auto ignitions. Good luck



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Discussion Starter #6
My two cents....I'm speaking from experience on other cars as I am not familiar with the Sonata.
If the key turned easily to the ACC position if follows that there is nothing really wrong with the lock/key portion. Perhaps the electrical ignition switch is jamming up. Usually disassembling the ignition lock is not difficult, but a good key is required to turn the assembly to the on position or you can't access some of the fasteners.
I would try a new or different key just because it is the cheapest and easiest route to take but I suspect there is another problem. Let us know how this works out.

Ended up getting a lock smith to come out and take a look at it. Turns out the key was just worn out, got two new keys
 

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Good to hear things worked out for you. Doesn't make sense to me but that's not important. You learn new things every day. Thank you for the update.
 

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The new cutting (CC) machines read a key and interpret the depth for each cut, instead of making a clone of a worn key.
 
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