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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have recently purchased a 64 plate Hyundai i10 and when I go to drive it in the morning or for the first time in a while it starts up completely fine and also when it turns off and I instantly turn it back on its completely fine. but if I leave it for between 3mins and 30mins ish it will take a few more seconds to start up?

anyone have any idea what is causing this or if it is an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have recently purchased a 64 plate Hyundai i10 and when I go to drive it in the morning or for the first time in a while it starts up completely fine and also when it turns off and I instantly turn it back on its completely fine. but if I leave it for between 3mins and 30mins ish it will take a few more seconds to start up?

anyone have any idea what is causing this or if it is an issue.
also it could be a coincidence that its just after I leave it for a while as its only happened a few times now.
 

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The car really likes to just be started and do a journey then switch off. I had a problem when I moved the car a couple of times in and out of the garage and then all dressed up to go out for the evening with the wife the car just would not start. The following day it still would not start so I phoned the AA. The patrol man phoned up and told me to keep cranking the car pumping the gas pedal till it started. Sure enough it spluttered then burst into life. The car he said very easily gets flooded when you turn it off while the ECU is injecting a certain amount of fuel. We were always told to crank flooded older cars with the foot to the floor, but that doesn't work on fuel injection.
I don't see you have a problem you stop the car and instantly restart and it's fine, but leave it for a bit and the ECU will be working out how to set the fuelling based on what the sensors are sending. I'm no engineer, but that's the way I see it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ve recently purchased a 64 plate Hyundai i10 and when I go to drive it in the morning or for the first time in a wh
The car really likes to just be started and do a journey then switch off. I had a problem when I moved the car a couple of times in and out of the garage and then all dressed up to go out for the evening with the wife the car just would not start. The following day it still would not start so I phoned the AA. The patrol man phoned up and told me to keep cranking the car pumping the gas pedal till it started. Sure enough it spluttered then burst into life. The car he said very easily gets flooded when you turn it off while the ECU is injecting a certain amount of fuel. We were always told to crank flooded older cars with the foot to the floor, but that doesn't work on fuel injection.
I don't see you have a problem you stop the car and instantly restart and it's fine, but leave it for a bit and the ECU will be working out how to set the fuelling based on what the sensors are sending. I'm no engineer, but that's the way I see it.
Ok that's great and would make sense in this situation.

Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The car really likes to just be started and do a journey then switch off. I had a problem when I moved the car a couple of times in and out of the garage and then all dressed up to go out for the evening with the wife the car just would not start. The following day it still would not start so I phoned the AA. The patrol man phoned up and told me to keep cranking the car pumping the gas pedal till it started. Sure enough it spluttered then burst into life. The car he said very easily gets flooded when you turn it off while the ECU is injecting a certain amount of fuel. We were always told to crank flooded older cars with the foot to the floor, but that doesn't work on fuel injection.
I don't see you have a problem you stop the car and instantly restart and it's fine, but leave it for a bit and the ECU will be working out how to set the fuelling based on what the sensors are sending. I'm no engineer, but that's the way I see it.
Sorry just to make sure as I am a new driver even though I think you said at the end. This isn't a problem or issue its just how the car works and I don't need to take it to a garage to be fixed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sorry just to make sure as I am a new driver even though I think you said at the end. This isn't a problem or issue its just how the car works and I don't need to take it to a garage to be fixed.
Just an update that the problem was a minor fault in the fuel injection cap which was letting in slightly more fuel than it should and was fixed in under an hour at a Hyundai garage.
 
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