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I'm not sure it does that much good. When I lose traction in cuts gas. Not sure it does anything else, especially when going slow. I might turn it off when going slow and seeking traction, like up a hill, and turn it back on when going faster.
What do you think?
 

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If people were taught how to drive properly, we wouldn't dumb ourselves down with safety features like traction control and ABS.
 

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If people were taught how to drive properly, we wouldn't dumb ourselves down with safety features like traction control and ABS.
+1000

I'm always surprised at the sheer number of people going 100 down the highway during a blizzard or just generally icy conditions. Sure, that's the speed limit, but really? Have you no common sense? MPI has a great commercial about the importance of adapting to the weather.
 

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+1000

I'm always surprised at the sheer number of people going 100 down the highway during a blizzard or just generally icy conditions. Sure, that's the speed limit, but really? Have you no common sense? MPI has a great commercial about the importance of adapting to the weather.

Nobody else knows what MPI is.
 

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I'm with the group, I generally turn it off when the roads are bad. I also turn it off when I am driving sporty. I haven't looked up any technical data, but the last time I hit a hard corner fast enough for some tire squeal, it killed the throttle and felt like it hit the inside rear brake. Makes the car unpredictable.
 

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beginning with the 2011 elantra, Hyundai dumbed down ( cheapened) the rear suspension by using an el-cheap-o torsion beam rear setup without a rear anti-sway bar. some brands that use this setup , like Nissan, vw, and ford in lower models, do include the rear anti-sway bar. others just use a multi-link setup instead, cheaper the i.r.s. , but much better than the Hyundai setup. it screams penny-pinching a few extra pennies of profit . the decline in handling is not as noticeable on the lighter accent. but, using the esc as an electronic substitute for the physical rear anti-sway bar does not work on accents, elantras, or velosters.
many posters on Hyundai's own forum talk about bunny hop/bump steer/feeling that the rear is going to swing out on curves.
engine improvements have been offset by cheapening the rear suspensions.
you can add regular or donut spare, use better handling tires , and add more weight ( bags of litter or sand ) to the trunk to help out.
 

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beginning with the 2011 elantra, Hyundai dumbed down ( cheapened) the rear suspension by using an el-cheap-o torsion beam rear setup without a rear anti-sway bar. some brands that use this setup , like Nissan, vw, and ford in lower models, do include the rear anti-sway bar. others just use a multi-link setup instead, cheaper the i.r.s. , but much better than the Hyundai setup. it screams penny-pinching a few extra pennies of profit . the decline in handling is not as noticeable on the lighter accent. but, using the esc as an electronic substitute for the physical rear anti-sway bar does not work on accents, elantras, or velosters.
many posters on Hyundai's own forum talk about bunny hop/bump steer/feeling that the rear is going to swing out on curves.
engine improvements have been offset by cheapening the rear suspensions.
you can add regular or donut spare, use better handling tires , and add more weight ( bags of litter or sand ) to the trunk to help out.
Weight in the back does help, even a good 50 pounds in the rear.

I thought we only had a beam axle, and NO torsion bar. Is that right? All I know is exactly what you said in which Hyundai cheaped out, but hey, it's a Hyundai.
 

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Weight in the back does help, even a good 50 pounds in the rear.

I thought we only had a beam axle, and NO torsion bar. Is that right? All I know is exactly what you said in which Hyundai cheaped out, but hey, it's a Hyundai.
the bar replaces the springs. in front, they are part of the strut.
the back shocks are separate.
 

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Weight in the back does help, even a good 50 pounds in the rear.

I thought we only had a beam axle, and NO torsion bar. Is that right? All I know is exactly what you said in which Hyundai cheaped out, but hey, it's a Hyundai.
This makes sense, i took the ~60 lbs of bowling bars i usually have in the trunk when it was frigid cold this week, and noticed a decrease in handling
 
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