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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a set of genuine Hyundai boxed spark plugs from a seller off the famous auction site for £12.95 inc postage and replaced the old ones with the new today. 20 minute job. Old plugs might have gone on for a fair bit longer, but for the price and the fact the old ones were pretty grubby looking, I was happy to swap them out.
For anyone else with a 1.2, in my case a 2015 model, the spark plug part number is 18848-10080, RER8WYP B4. They are Champion brand plugs. However, I've done some digging and it seems that Fiat plugs, part number 55240046, appear to be identical and I can buy them for £1.49 each. I'm going to buy one as a test purchase to compare against one of the old plugs I've just pulled out. If indeed they are the same, I'll buy another 3 at the price they're being sold for.
 

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In my opinion, ...

I replaced my spark plugs with different brand
After two weeks, I bought NGKs and changed them again
They have been there ever since
I like NGKs for the Asian cars
 

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How would anybody know that anything is genuine unless you can compare it with a known genuine part with the box etc. The market is flooded with fakes that look right on first inspection, but fail miserably. With spark plugs you can't compare makes by putting them side by side. Put the wrong grade in and at worst you can put a hole in the pistons.
https://www.scc-racing.com/racing-blog/warning-non-genuine-spark-plugs
 

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Discussion Starter #4
How would anybody know that anything is genuine unless you can compare it with a known genuine part with the box etc. .......
I know what you mean, but I can assure you, the plugs I bought are definitely genuine Hyundai boxed plugs, just clearly old shelf stock. They are Champion branded. I removed one of the old plugs from the car to check they were the correct ones before purchase and they are, identical in every way

A lot of the parts I buy off ebay are from dealerships selling off old stock. I've had some absolutely amazing purchases and saved literally hundreds of pounds over the last 5 years or so buying old dealer stock. The Fiat plugs I've seen, are genuine and being sold by a Fiat dealership. I've bought one and just waiting for it to arrive to compare it against one of the old ones. At £1.49 a plug including postage, it's just too good a price not to buy. The Fiat plugs tend to be NGK plugs, I replaced the plugs in our old 500 1.2 and they were in Fiat boxes but were NGK.
 

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I'm not convinced the fakers are even aging boxes, individual wrapping and instructions for the classic market where people are wanting 50s plugs. Dealers are unlikely to be flogging their stock cheap when they can stick them in with a service and do a big mark up on them.
I would only buy things like that a source I knew well and if the car has been serviced every year like mine has 2015 model as well it shouldn't need attention unless it's not running rightl. You're still in warranty like me and if you put in by chance bad stuff it'll cost you a packet. Auction sites are selling thousands of fakes of all types and it takes experts sometimes to pick out the tiniest difference. The worst things are fake bearings they look fine, but fail disastrously in service and big companies have been hit by massive repairs and downtime.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well I've bought from a genuine dealership selling off old stock. I rarely buy stuff from private sellers. Dealerships cannot afford to sell off fake stuff, indeed they wouldn't, the consequences for them would be pretty bad and they wouldn't want the damaging publicity to go with it.

We're different owners doing different things. I am an experienced, competent home mechanic. I'm not going to risk putting non genuine parts in the car, save for the pollen filter, which to be honest has just turned up at my door now, is a genuine Mapco branded filter and half the price of a genuine Hyundai filter.


As for the replacement discs and pads all round that the car now has, as far as I'm concerned, the Pagid stuff is better than what came out of the factory, even the Comline rear pads. What's more, I've done the entire job (discs and pads including new stainless steel disc securing screws) for £130 fitted. I don't even want to wonder what Hyundai would have charged me to do that lot with genuine Hyundai parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I actually contradicted myself in my last post. What I meant was, I wouldn't risk installing any non genuine engine parts. Other parts from recognised well known brands bought from reputable sources, no issues. I do take the point about bearings though. Years ago, I had a wheel bearing destroy itself just months after installing. Turned out the garage I'd used to do the job, was installing the cheapest rubbish they could buy in. I never used that garage again.


PS: I just installed the Mapco pollen filter. The old pollen filter had snapped on the plastic at the front anyway, but in terms of quality, the Mapco filter appears to more than a match for the Hyundai filter.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Anyone got a step by step on how to access the plugs.. Might service it myself.
1. Unclip the airbox top housing and lift away
2. 10mm socket, undo the securing bolt holding on the large air hose to your right and pull off the large hose to release it from the air box. Make sure nothing is allowed to fall into the hose opening.

3. Same 10mm socket, undo the one bolt holding down the air housing to your left and put it down safely where you can find it.

4. Unclip the hose sitting at the rear of the air box and then carefully pull up on the whole airbox assembly, it should just pop off. Place it down carefully. You will clearly see the air filter assembly. Mine was pretty clean, there was no need for me to change it.


5. You will now have a clear unobstructed view of the top of the engine and the four spark plug HT leads. Simply, carefully, wriggle and pull up on the HT lead and pull the thing clear of the spark plug chamber.


6. Using a 16mm spark plug socket with a rubber insert that grips the top of the plug, attach it to an extention bar and a ratchet and carefully unscrew and lift the plug clear.


7. Replace with a new plug, carefully inserting the new plug to prevent cross threading. Tighten down. I torqued it down to 17nm. Replace HT lead and move onto the next plug. I worked from left to right as you look at the engine.


8. Replace airbox. Replacement is reverse of above.

The whole job with the right tools shouldn't take any longer than 20 minutes, 30 at most.
Use genuine plugs or a recognised alternative brand sourced from a reputable supplier. There should be no need to set any gaps, they are pre set.

Disclaimer: Clearly you attempt the job at your own risk. I can't and won't be held responsible for any issues. If you are in any way not sure or confident, let someone who is qualified do the job. :smile:
 

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As my 4 year old i10 1L 3 POT is very low mileage I asked my new super dealer to leave the old ones in the car when they serviced it,checked them and they are prefect they even fitted the electrode protection from the new plugs and the box.So when out of warranty when I am servicing it they can go back in for another 10k miles! Original plugs are Champion RER8WYPB4
 

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bought the champions as suggested above and recommended elsewhere for my 2012 Style and it idles rough and sounds like it’s running on 3

replaced the plugs I pulled out, NGK LKR6D10E and it runs fine

very odd
 
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