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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon everyone!

I'm planning on replacing my spark plugs tomorrow, I doubt they've ever been replaced and the car is now 10 years old with over 260 kilometres. I think this has been long overdue.

I have bought the spark plugs, NGK Iridium.

I wasn't aware a specific "spark plug wrench" was required, good thing I read the back of the packaging. Bought a "tune-up kit" which includes three different size spark plug sockets, the ratchet, and the gap gauge thingy. I'm wondering why I couldn't just use one of my long regular sockets for this? Will probably find out when I perform the procedure.

What else do you recommend I need/do?

Will I require any sprays/seals/etc.? I read somewhere it was recommended you use dielectric spray for the electrical components the plugs go into or something like that?

Anxious to see what kind of difference this makes performance, starting, fuel economy and accelerating wise.

Any tips, suggestions, anything?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
OH and I ordered the throttle body gasket today from Parts Source, paid a whole $1.80! Should arrive tonight, will also do this same time I do the spark plugs. Weather is getting pretty crappy here and I don't have a garage, hoping tomorrow is nice out so I can get this done if not I'm looking at sometime next week :(


What else should I be looking at replacing/checking?
 

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get a good quality wire set too. At that mileage, change the wires as well since the engine is open. and you'll need a new plenum gasket to be safe as well. If you are looking at other odds and ends to do, take the pcv valve off and clean that out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
get a good quality wire set too. At that mileage, change the wires as well since the engine is open. and you'll need a new plenum gasket to be safe as well. If you are looking at other odds and ends to do, take the pcv valve off and clean that out.

Thanks! I was looking at the wires while selecting the spark plugs and thinking about it. What are your thoughts on switching to boots?

Will order the plenum gasket when I go to pick up the TB gasket tonight, thanks for suggesting that I wouldn't have known to do so otherwise.

And PCV valve? Is that the purge valve? If so, last week I completely replaced it with a new one, I was getting the no start after filling up issue. If not, what type of cleaner should I use?

Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Also, something I've been wondering..

On the throttle body, the piece with the spring coil around it, the part that actually moves by the throttle cable when the pedal is pressed.. is it fine to spray some WD40 on it??
 

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Hit your local Hyundai or Kia dealer for the plug wires.. they fit right, correct length, ends sealed, do it 1 time and be done. Plenum gasket is stock item at dealer too.

Dont skimp on parts for price, it toooooo much work to take the V6 apart to do it as a beginner, then find out you gots to take it back apart for poor quality parts.

You dont need throttle body gasket when doing plugs on a 2.7,, just the plenum to lower intake gasket (6 hole)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
No don't spray wd40 in throttle body. Here is what appears to be an old article but still valid tips on throttle body cleaning.

Bottom line stick with products made for throttle body cleaning and servicing
Thank you! Will avoid the WD40 and read this article shortly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hit your local Hyundai or Kia dealer for the plug wires.. they fit right, correct length, ends sealed, do it 1 time and be done. Plenum gasket is stock item at dealer too.

Dont skimp on parts for price, it toooooo much work to take the V6 apart to do it as a beginner, then find out you gots to take it back apart for poor quality parts.

You dont need throttle body gasket when doing plugs on a 2.7,, just the plenum to lower intake gasket (6 hole)
Ahh already bought the NGK wires from Canadian Tire. They're supposed to be an OEM fit it claims.

I need the TB gasket because I plan on removing the TB and thoroughly cleaning it out inside and out. Ordered the gasket for the TB, went to pick it up, they accidentally ordered me a 2.4L one which doesn't work. Going to order the proper one tomorrow from a different location. Will end up doing the spark plugs and wires only tomorrow, and TB cleaning Wednesday when I get the new gasket. Also bought the plenum gasket today thanks to the advice on here, only cost me $7.

I now have everything to proceed tomorrow. Replacing the wires should be pretty straight forward yes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
sbr711 -

Two questions.

1. Is it okay to use the NGK Iridium plugs? I was reading about issues with Hyundai and Bosch plugs, and in this came across it being recommended to use platinum.. I bought the iridium because they sounded a lot better.. okay, yes/no?

2. What size should the gap be? These are supposed to come fitted but I'm going to check each just in case for some reason one or all are not. What should they be at?

3. Is a torque wrench 100% required? That's the one thing I don't have. Can I just hand tighten them and then use a regular ratchet and turn it a certain length?

Okay I lied that was 3 questions.

Thanks in advance. I'm guessing you're a Hyundai dealer service mechanic
 

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Page 2 is all mine !!



sbr711 -

Two questions.

1. Is it okay to use the NGK Iridium plugs? I was reading about issues with Hyundai and Bosch plugs, and in this came across it being recommended to use platinum.. I bought the iridium because they sounded a lot better.. okay, yes/no?
110% OK with NGK IRIDIUM,, they wont burn electrode like the Platinum do at 60, they'll just be white/dusty, but electrode look almost new at 100 usually

2. What size should the gap be? These are supposed to come fitted but I'm going to check each just in case for some reason one or all are not. What should they be at?
0.040 to 0.043 be fine (inch)

3. Is a torque wrench 100% required? That's the one thing I don't have. Can I just hand tighten them and then use a regular ratchet and turn it a certain length?
Prefer to use torque wrench anymore,, I click them at 20 lb-ft anymore and run with it,, you'll want to use it too for the upper plenum and throttle body bolts/nuts

Okay I lied that was 3 questions.

Thanks in advance. I'm guessing you're a Hyundai dealer service technician
 

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a couple tips since you're new to this one:

- look up a quick tutorial on youtube, even if its a different car. no sense in going in blind.

- DO NOT under any circumstances try to change the gap or measure the gap with iridium plugs! copper sure, but iridium tips are too fine and you run the risk of damaging them. if you have purchased the correct plugs, there will be no need to adjust gap. i believe this is what NGK's site recommends.

- use anti-seize lubricant on the threads to prevent the plugs from getting seized in the head down the road and use dielectric grease on the plug wire end to prevent the plug wires from getting seized to the plug.

- love sbr's advice on using a torque wrench. i admit i do mine by hand, but i've done this a lot and have a good feel for it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
LOL awesome, congrats. Explains your wealth of knowledge!

Okay got it! Will buy a torque wrench tomorrow, I'm sure it'll come in handy many more times in the future.

What should I have the torque wrench set on for replacing the bolts on the upper plenum and the throttle body?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
a couple tips since you're new to this one:

- look up a quick tutorial on youtube, even if its a different car. no sense in going in blind.

- DO NOT under any circumstances try to change the gap or measure the gap with iridium plugs! copper sure, but iridium tips are too fine and you run the risk of damaging them. if you have purchased the correct plugs, there will be no need to adjust gap. i believe this is what NGK's site recommends.

- use anti-seize lubricant on the threads to prevent the plugs from getting seized in the head down the road and use dielectric grease on the plug wire end to prevent the plug wires from getting seized to the plug.

- love sbr's advice on using a torque wrench. i admit i do mine by hand, but i've done this a lot and have a good feel for it...
Hey thanks a bunch for the advice! Definitely wouldn't attempt this without having done some research. Aside from one Youtube video specifically on my model, I've also memorized this and will keep it nearby to refer to:

The spark plug replacement on the sante fe mods website... apparently can't post links until I've been registered a few more days. Lame.

Thanks again. Wouldn't be able to do any of this had it not been for the incredible amounts of information at our fingertips thanks to the interwebz.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
- use anti-seize lubricant on the threads to prevent the plugs from getting seized in the head down the road and use dielectric grease on the plug wire end to prevent the plug wires from getting seized to the plug.].
Will grab this from Canadian Tire
Permatex Dielectric Grease, 85g
Product #38-3759-0

What would you recommend for anti-seize lubricant? Will the one for silver work? I see three on Canadian Tire's website.
 

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a couple tips since you're new to this one:

- look up a quick tutorial on youtube, even if its a different car. no sense in going in blind.

- DO NOT under any circumstances try to change the gap or measure the gap with iridium plugs! copper sure, but iridium tips are too fine and you run the risk of damaging them. if you have purchased the correct plugs, there will be no need to adjust gap. i believe this is what NGK's site recommends.

- use anti-seize lubricant on the threads to prevent the plugs from getting seized in the head down the road and use dielectric grease on the plug wire end to prevent the plug wires from getting seized to the plug.

- love sbr's advice on using a torque wrench. i admit i do mine by hand, but i've done this a lot and have a good feel for it...
Good advice except the anti-seize. You shouldn't use it on modern plugs. NGK especially warns against using it for two reasons. First, it changes the torque spec if you use it. And ironically, you can torque it too much. There is a zinc compound built into the threads that acts like anti-seize over time. Anti-seize also messes with the ground you pick up from the threads over time. IF you don't believe me, go to their web site and you will get a much better explanation. I know all the "old school" mechanics still use it, but you shouldn't.

You can buy a torque wrench at Harbor Freight for around $12 when they go on sale.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Done! Took me about an hour and a half to from the time I removed the cover to the time I placed it back on.

Everything seems to be fine, with the exception of the ground wire that snapped when I was trying to unbolt it.

What issue can this cause?
 
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