Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm at 97K on my 2006 sonata 4cyl so it is nearly time to replace my spark plugs. What is a good price for spark plugs? The lowest I have found is about $10 each.

Also, while I do the job and have the spark plugs out should I be doing any other maintenance. I recall a firestone person saying something about spraying cleaner in there but I could be remembering wrong.
 

·
Registered
2007 Honda CRV
Joined
·
4,577 Posts
Price of spark plugs depends on the maker of the plug and the type of plug you decide to replace it with
Preferred are NGK. I have put Champion plugs in and after a week or two, went back and changed them again for NGK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Price of spark plugs depends on the maker of the plug and the type of plug you decide to replace it with
Preferred are NGK. I have put Champion plugs in and after a week or two, went back and changed them again for NGK
I was looking at the DENSO ones since that is what came with the car.
I did look at NGK, they do seem a little cheaper. around $7
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Advise you check with your Hyundai dealer and find out what CURRENT plug is being used for replacement of OEM ones. There will be a Hyundai part number behind which will be a specific manufacturer and part number of for the plug. You'll have to either visit the dealer or beg the parts guy to tell you the plugs specs behind the Hyundai part number. Then, once you get the manufacturer's part number, you can search for the plug online for best price and availability options. Good luck.

P.S. No goop goes down the holes into the cylinders, though a tad of never-seize compound on the plug threads and a dab of dielectric grease on the plug tubes is perfectly OK. No junk goes down the holes either, so be careful to blow out the cavities with compressed air after you pull the tubes but while the plugs are still in place. That way, any debris in the cavities won't fall into the cylinders during plug removal/replacement. I make sure I never have more than one hole "open" at any given point (so nothing can fall into the cylinders). So I blow all the cavities, pull a plug, install new one, and move on to the next. I then do a final round of checking torques (catches anything I may have missed—handy on a V6 or V8), then pop the tubes back on, secure the coils, put the plastic back, and voila!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
I was looking at the DENSO ones since that is what came with the car.
I did look at NGK, they do seem a little cheaper. around $7
Wow! Looking to save $10 or so, for something that probably only gets changed once in the life of the vehicle? I consider myself to be a cheap-a$$ed SOB, but you might have a step up on me! I'm of course just poking a bit of fun there, and not intending to actually criticize :wink:

AFA maintenance goes, if you have not already done so, follow the fluid replacement guidelines in your owner's manual, using 'time' instead of mileage.

IMO, the most important 'maintenance' item for any older vehicle is to monitor for fluid leaks. Check for spots where you park, both at home and also parking lots. Along with that, if physically possible for you to do, (safely) get under the vehicle and look for anything that's wet. And if anything is found, research and attempt to correct the leak asap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
well $10X4, thats $40. But yeah I'm a cheap SOB. I'm probably going to sell this car in a few years anyways so it probably doesnt matter.

I was going with the plugs specified in the owners manual.
The hyundai ones are Denso I believe.


I wasnt asking about general maintenance. I was just asking related to something I should do in the engine since I have the plugs out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Anything you need to do regarding specific maintenance is in the owner's manual; general maintenance you already have covered. What ISN'T in the owner's manual is the correct replacement plugs for the ones originally supplied from the factory. Only your Hyundai dealer has that information, and it is available to you as I outlined above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,432 Posts
Anything you need to do regarding specific maintenance is in the owner's manual; general maintenance you already have covered. What ISN'T in the owner's manual is the correct replacement plugs for the ones originally supplied from the factory. Only your Hyundai dealer has that information, and it is available to you as I outlined above.
Well those of us that follow Hyundai are aware that they are currently recommending a new NGK plug for the Theta II engine line that they will sell you for a kings ransom, what I've not seem is any TSB requiring you to use this new and badly overpriced NGK plug, also auto parts shop will sell you a variety of plugs from other mfgs, so if Hyundai is recommending one particular plug this information is not being properly communicated to owners or resellers, saying you must use one particular plug, which just happens to cost you $27 if you buy at a dealership as it's not widely available.
So I bought $4 Denso 3479 from Rock auto for some $ 44 including shipping and I say to the h*ll with Hyundai and their convoluted efforts to suck you into buying a spark plug that is badly overpriced.
If this plug solves a particular problem they should be advising owners of this and making it available at a reasonable price point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
I'm not defending Hyundai's practices in any way, shape, or form. I'm stating that the CORRECT (Hyundai-approved) replacement plug, oil filter, wear part, etc. is NOT NECESSARILY to be found in the owner's manual since that manual was produced at the same time the vehicle was originally made. Routine and exceptional changes to parts' specifications (like colder plugs), structural makeup (like steering couplers), and suppliers (like oil filters) often result in new part designations which can ONLY be definitively determined from Hyundai though its dealer network.

To the extent you disagree with Hyundai's parts changes, you are free to substitute what you will when you will. Whether and to what extent doing so affects Hyundai's warranty coverage in case of, say, an engine failure in your vehicle is for you to find out. Surely you checked Rock Auto's "support" of the plugs you purchased and discovered the retailer provides no warranty at all: it simply passes through to you the manufacturer's standard warranty. So what is Denso's warranty coverage for the plugs you purchased and installed into your Hyundai? Does it cover damage resulting from a plug failure or misapplication or is it strictly limited to refund/replacement of the failed plug?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
882 Posts
basically you need to spray anti-sieze on the spark plug threads, clean the wire connectors if inside is dirty. Torque for spark plugs are usually 21 ft/lbs don't exceed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,432 Posts
I'm not defending Hyundai's practices in any way, shape, or form. I'm stating that the CORRECT (Hyundai-approved) replacement plug, oil filter, wear part, etc. is NOT NECESSARILY to be found in the owner's manual since that manual was produced at the same time the vehicle was originally made. Routine and exceptional changes to parts' specifications (like colder plugs), structural makeup (like steering couplers), and suppliers (like oil filters) often result in new part designations which can ONLY be definitively determined from Hyundai though its dealer network.

To the extent you disagree with Hyundai's parts changes, you are free to substitute what you will when you will. Whether and to what extent doing so affects Hyundai's warranty coverage in case of, say, an engine failure in your vehicle is for you to find out. Surely you checked Rock Auto's "support" of the plugs you purchased and discovered the retailer provides no warranty at all: it simply passes through to you the manufacturer's standard warranty. So what is Denso's warranty coverage for the plugs you purchased and installed into your Hyundai? Does it cover damage resulting from a plug failure or misapplication or is it strictly limited to refund/replacement of the failed plug?
I think you have some misconceptions regards warranty information, a spark plug mfg may warranty their product to be free of defects - eg made and work properly but none that I've ever heard of accept responsibility for the engine that plug is installed in. So if my engine was to be damaged by a spark plug coming apart, that would be taken up with Hyundai, and legally would be covered if I followed the maintenance recommendation - which is why I am replacing the OEM plugs at 60k miles - 15k miles over Hyundais interval, I don't want that exposure if I have an issue.
Secondly I find nothing in the maintenance manual or have received no communication from Hyundai that I must use a spark plug from a particular mfg - so given that I am free to choose a plug from any mfg that meets the spec for my engine, Hyundai may currently recommend a different plug from what the engine was equipped with from the factory, but there is a difference between requiring and recommending. I believe that the Moss Magnuson warranty law may apply here - that if Hyundai reguires you to use only a specific make of an item then they are required to provide you that for free.
So I'd like to see the TSB or other form of communication from Hyundai that in order to maintain my warranty I am required to use a NGK plug. If no such document exists I am free to use a spark plug from any mfg that is designed to work in the engine, my choice is the Denso plug , available from Rock Auto at $10.50 each, it is an irridium plug that I believe is the OEM . I would not expect to hold neither Rock Auto nor Denso accountable for any engine damage , same as NGK would not be accountable - unless it could be proven that a particular plug was defective and responsible for engine damage - likely a really really tough claim to prove.
Bottom line I'm not buying a plug for $27 nor interested in paying the dealer some $200 to do a very very very simple and I mean very simple maintenance procedure. And I am well within my rights to do so and maintain the vehicle warranty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,432 Posts
If Hyundai and KIA are using the new limited source availability NGK plug in all newer Theta II engines - I would expect at some point, maybe fairly soon that plug will become available via aftermarket resellers - and priced in line with their other iridium spark plugs, not the marked up $27 at the dealer.

If it proves the new NGK plug eliminates the engines getting trashed because of the spark plug breaking apart - I would think it to be in Hyundai's best interest to change out the plugs on a nc basis or provide them for free to those who wrench. But I suspect it's not going to completely solve the problem, but may reduce it to a further degree, I don't see a lot of information being shared by Hyundai as to why specifically the NGK plug is better - as in a letter to owners saying we recommend using this plug which is available from these sources.

I don't have any concerns about using the Denso irridium plug as a recent inspection of my plugs shows they are in really great shape - uniform in color and condition same across all cylinders. Would run them to 80 ~ 100k except for the warranty stipulation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I'm getting ready to do the job. Before I open it up, can someone please let me know how long of a socket extension bar I need to be able to reach down
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Here is the plug socket/extension I've been using on various Hyundai, Acura, and Lexus vehicles with great success. Works great going down into the plug holes and keeping a secure grip on the plugs (hot or cold), but remember to tape it to your ratchet extension so it doesn't stay down in the plug hole when you pull up on it. Plus it's 20% off when you use online ordering with in-store pickup. Good luck with the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
Bottom line I'm not buying a plug for $27 nor interested in paying the dealer some $200 to do a very very very simple and I mean very simple maintenance procedure.
The dealer quoted me $250 for the new plugs. I bought the same ones off eBay for $60 and took 20 minutes to change them during a lunch break. Can't believe Hyundai gets away charging $27/plug.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
$250 is ridiculous for a four-popper with everything front (reachable) and center (visible). You must've really been dogging it for the job to take a full 20 minutes...

You want some REAL scary plug change quotes? Try a Mustang GT with 8 of those extra-long plugs that crack in half when you look at them. Even the dealers quote a "we'll just have to see how it goes" price for THAT job. And for pure nonsense, get a quote from a Lexus dealer on swapping out eight of their platinums or iridiums on a top-line unit (hint: double the plugs, double the Hyundai dealer's price).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Here is the plug socket/extension I've been using on various Hyundai, Acura, and Lexus vehicles with great success. Works great going down into the plug holes and keeping a secure grip on the plugs (hot or cold), but remember to tape it to your ratchet extension so it doesn't stay down in the plug hole when you pull up on it. Plus it's 20% off when you use online ordering with in-store pickup. Good luck with the job.
Thanks but I was really looking to find out the depth so I know if the extension I currently own will do the job. I'd rather not take everything apart and find out I have to put it all back together to drive out and buy another tool. Yes, I definitely will put some tape on as that has probably been my biggest fear of the whole job.

BTW, since the thread is talking about price, I bought Denso's, 4 for $29
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Not sure I fully understand. What are you using for a plug socket? How does it hold the plug (rubber, magnet, etc.)? If it's similar to the tool I linked, how long is it? And do you have one or more ratchet extensions of differing lengths? If so, what lengths?

As I recall the plug change job on a 13 Sonata 2.0T, I used the plug socket tool I linked (6") along with with a standard 4" ratchet extension. The extension was needed more so the ratchet handle could swing clear of various engine parts than to reach way down into the the plug hole (as I recall the plug socket tool was long enough to project out of the plug hole a bit, but not enough to swing the ratchet handle freely). You tape the plug socket tool to the ratchet extension - duct tape works a treat. At any rate, that's my recollection of the tools I used. You will also want a source of compressed air to blow out the plug hole cavities before removing the plugs so any loose material that collects down there won't fall into the cylinder once you expose it by removing the plug. If you don't have a compressor handy, you can buy a can of compressed air (used to blow out computer keyboards) that will do the job. You may also wish to apply a bit of anti-seize compound to the plug threads as well as a bit of dielectric grease to the plug tube/plug terminal. Good luck with the job.

Oh, one final tip: be sure to start screwing in the new plugs gently and by hand. Only when you're sure you have each plug properly threaded do you use the ratchet to fully seat the plug then "torque it to factory specs."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
My socket is the type that is included in a socket set. It has something like a rubber gasket which holds the spark plug fairly tight. I guess the rubber is still good since I've only used it once or twice. The socket + my extension comes out to approx 6.5in in length. (I originally bought the extension for removing my oil filter). I'm just wondering if I need to buy a longer extension.

I suppose if something slips loose, I should be able to use my magnetic pick up tool to grab stuff out.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top