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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ideally the sensor should be replaced when doing the timing belt job, but unfortunately, not everyone bothers. If it fails while driving, the car will simply shut down and refuse to start. This happened to the previous owner of my Sonata. The sensor had to be replaced shortly after the timing belt job, resulting in high and unnecessary labor costs.

Anyway, I found this nice little DIY video of it's location and more or less how to get to it on a 2.4L Santa Fe... same deal for the Sonata.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gwta1NvtsQ

Once you remove the wheel, fender liner and timing belt cover, you'll see the part.

Now I usually don't take shortcuts, but I'll be damned if I'd be removing all the parts it would take, just to run the cable to where it plugs in on top of the engine. Personally, I would cut the wires about three inches from the sensor, then crimp in the new sensor, using shielded crimps to join the wires.

Hope this helps someone...
 

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So, I am doing my timing belt, and I have a p0340 code as well. I have a relatively simple question

Ebay sells these sensors cheap, but the connector on the firewall shows a triangular connector. The connector on my car is rectangular with the same 2 wires red blue and black.

In the interests of Kiss principle, can I cut the bad censor off and splice the new one? The reason I ask is two fold.

Firstly, ebay sells mine but for $100 more than the triangle version.

Secondly, its my understanding that trying to replace the entire section of cable is very difficult.


Thanks
 

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Cheaper sensors on Ebay/Amazon, etc. should be viewed with caution even if the reviews declare it is better than sliced bread. Just considering the warranty period alone of none/no returns to 15-30 days before you lose your money, it is less risky to buy from an auto parts retailer or say, Rockauto, when considering warranties of 3 months, 3 years or limited lifetime, etc. Also, stay away from Chinese junk even when purchasing locally or online and stay with OEM or equivalent manufacture as much as possible.
 

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Yes, it's in plain site.
It's right at the very end of the exhaust cam shaft, so front of the cylinder head, far right. It has a three wire harness connector.
 

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Yes, it's in plain site.
It's right at the very end of the exhaust cam shaft, so front of the cylinder head, far right. It has a three wire harness connector.
I see a pigtail but it looks to be on the back of the cylinder head, intake side of the 2.0L. It must be it.
 

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WOW...1998. I don't think any Hyundai here in the UK have survived that long.
Your '98 is fitted with the old Mitsubishi engine which explains why it's different. I assumed we were working with the same type of engine that the threads OP was telling us about.
 

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WOW...1998. I don't think any Hyundai here in the UK have survived that long.
Your '98 is fitted with the old Mitsubishi engine which explains why it's different. I assumed we were working with the same type of engine that the threads OP was telling us about.
Ok, found it behind the intake sprocket. It was in pieces. Chunks of plastic were everywhere. Even metal bushing from bolt hole was found below by itself. I cant imagine how this thing could have self destructed so badly.

I will post the picture once its installed. Part is PC45 cam sensor and sell on auction sites for under 10 bucks
 
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