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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm a Sonata newb here. I recently bought my first car, and I've been driving it for about 1000km so far.

The car's average consumption in the city, has been 16.5 Liters per 100 km (14.26 MPG), which is way more than what was posted (11.5 liters per 100km).

I have been using only premium gas (91 octane), and the current tank I actually used 94 Octane, with the tactrol additive (I don't have the MPG for 94 octane yet).

I'm wondering if there are other 2006 Sonata GLv6 who could share their own MPG or L/100km

Thanks in advance.
 

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First off, you are wasting your money on premium gas - one of the pluses of the Sonata is that it uses regular gas with no complaints at all.

Gas mileage? In English units which the U.S. is still so fond of, the least I've ever gotten is around 16 or 17 mpg for local driving. And that was this past summer with plenty of A/C usage (which I think lowers mpg somewhat, although current opinion is that it doesn't).

By local driving, I'm talking about no long trips - just suburban type driving. If you were driving exclusively in a big city, I could see any V6 dropping to 14 or 15 mpg, simply because of all the waiting around at lights, etc.

Take a trip out of the city - a day trip somewhere - and see what sort of mpg your getting.
 

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I only get about 22 or 23 mpg in my I4 Sonata, and I don't let the rpms get above 2000. I don't do any freeway driving at all though. Hope that helps a bit since you would think the I4 would be higher too.
 

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QUOTE (Camden @ Oct 26 2010, 08:37 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=366390
I only get about 22 or 23 mpg in my I4 Sonata, and I don't let the rpms get above 2000. I don't do any freeway driving at all though. Hope that helps a bit since you would think the I4 would be higher too.
I would think that continously keeping the RPMs that low would contribute to the build up of deposits in the engine which could decrease efficiency and performance. I notice that after a good drive on the highway, at least a couple of hours, the around town MPG improves significantly for a while. I think the higher engine temps/pressures/etc. help clean out the engine and improve overall performance and efficiency. I typically get mid-to-high 20's MPG around town and low-to-mid 30's on the highway. I suppose additives might help, but I can't remember the last time I used any additives on my vehicle.
 

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I fully agree with ActionMan. No engine likes stop-n-go driving. We used to own a new Volvo 850 that soon after couple months of ownership developed engine problems 'cause my wife never took it out to the highway.

This MPG issue is probably the most beat-up issue here, and probably in EVERY car forum.

So I will say it again: THERE IS NO WAY TO JUDGE A CAR'S GAS MILEAGE BASED ON CITY DRIVING! The way I drive in my neighborhood is NOT the same way you drive in yours, OK? Even if both of us were driving in the SAME neighborhood, we'd get different results.....

So, if you really want to check your car's gas mileage, TAKE IT OUT FOR A LONG HIGWAY TRIP (200-300 mile long), KEEP AT A STEADY SPEED OF 60-65 MPH (go out on a quiet early Sunday morning, and use the Cruise Control), fill up right before getting on the highway, and right when you exit. You'll get decent numbers. If you are willing to suffer, and drive 50-55 -- you'll see even better numbers....

Then, and ONLY THEN you would be able to make an educated decision about how efficient and well tuned your engine is.
 

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I drive 40 miles each way on my stop and go, freeway commute from Tacoma, WA to Seattle and back. I usually get 400 miles per tank on my V6, filling up around 15-16 gallons or so. This averages out to about 25 miles per gallon. Even when I include a weekend, where I might have some running around, it's still pretty close, maybe dropping a mile/gallon or two. I would think though that all city driving would be terrible on this car. I agree with other posters, Premium is a waste of time. I filled up once, just so that the myth was broken and it was. No noticable gains.

I know your driving habits are different than mine, but offer my experience just as a comparison. Congrats on the new car, you'll enjoy it much more when you stop worrying about the gas mileage and stomp on the gas!

Regards,
DB
 

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Try some fuel injector cleaner (Lucas for about $5) and see if that helps...cheap easy solution if it works...
 

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QUOTE (dungbeetle12 @ Oct 26 2010, 04:09 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=366526
I agree with other posters, Premium is a waste of time. I filled up once, just so that the myth was broken and it was. No noticable gains.
The only time I regularly used premium gas was with my Saab, it was the only vehicle I have owned that really needed premium. Since the turbo waste gate was activated when the engine started to knock, using anything other than premium would significantly diminish its performance. To me it didn't make sense to drive a car like that and not get the fullest measure of performance. Of course, back then premium was only around $1 a gallon. :w00t:
 

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I also have a 2006 GL V6. I've been tracking my fuel consumption on the Transport Canada web site for a while now (~15 months) and the best I've had is 7.1 L/100km and the worst is 13.8 L/100 km (in winter conditions). My average over that span of time is 10.4 L/100 km. I do mostly city type driving sometimes in very heavy traffic.

A lot depends on your driving habits. If you are constantly tapping into the V6 power leaving every stoplight you are going to use lots of gas. I only use regular gas in my Sonata.

How many kilometers are on your Sonata? Do you know the maintenance history?
 

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It's not only how you treat your gas pedal, it's also treating your BRAKE pedal.... The smoother you drive, the better gas mileage you get.
 

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QUOTE (ActionMan @ Oct 26 2010, 09:07 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=366398
I would think that continously keeping the RPMs that low would contribute to the build up of deposits in the engine which could decrease efficiency and performance. I notice that after a good drive on the highway, at least a couple of hours, the around town MPG improves significantly for a while. I think the higher engine temps/pressures/etc. help clean out the engine and improve overall performance and efficiency. I typically get mid-to-high 20's MPG around town and low-to-mid 30's on the highway. I suppose additives might help, but I can't remember the last time I used any additives on my vehicle.
Mine is an 07, and only has a 4-speed auto. I know if it had a 5th gear my MPG would improve quite a bit. There is a sweet spot at 47 mph and 33 mph in my car for the gears when the car just purrssssssssss. My problem, who drives 33 or 47 mph? Not me :( But I can live with my MPG :)
 

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QUOTE (Camden @ Oct 28 2010, 08:50 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=366935
Mine is an 07, and only has a 4-speed auto. I know if it had a 5th gear my MPG would improve quite a bit. There is a sweet spot at 47 mph and 33 mph in my car for the gears when the car just purrssssssssss. My problem, who drives 33 or 47 mph? Not me :( But I can live with my MPG :)
Yeah, 4-speed is not as efficient as 5-speed, which is not as efficient as 6-speed, especially at higher speeds. Even if you are cool with your MPG, I would suggest a trip sometime to at least give the engine a chance to clean itself out. I think you might be surprised at the improvements in MPG, performance, etc. just letting the engine open up and let loose for a while. IMHO, the Sonata is such a nice highway vehicle and it really does love to get out on the road and just cruise while you enjoy being transported in style and comfort. (How's that for a commercial! :wink2: )
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Some of you have mentioned that the Sonata does not need Premium gas, but I was only going by what the manual recommended. I will try to use regular on my next fill up, and see what happens to the MPG.

Same as Camdem, I was never really pushing the motor above 2000 RPM, unless I needed the power to overtake someone. I also break smoothly, and also give myself extra room in front, to avoid using the brakes as much as I can. The one thing I haven't done yet is a long road trip anywhere, but I'll try it to see what happens, then I'll post it here.

@ dungbeetle12, thanks for the kind words!
@ Klute, I will try the Fuel injector cleaners.
@ rallyman, your numbers are encouraging, hopefully I can get close to this! My Sonata has ~92k KM, I don't know the maintenance history, but I know that my dealership does. I will ask for it.
@ ActionMan, you are so right, it's a pleasure to drive it. :)

Thanks to all who have posted. I'll keep this updated with my findings.
 

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The manual recommends 87 (?) octane; that's regular unleaded in the US.
 

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QUOTE (Dennis the Mennis @ Nov 3 2010, 11:34 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=368666
The manual recommends 87 (?) octane; that's regular unleaded in the US.
Due to the altitude here in Colorado, regular unleaded is 85, and works fine for all vehicles that use 87 octane at or near sea level.
 

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QUOTE (cantfoolthewise @ Dec 31 2010, 03:04 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=385076
87 is the minimum you use regardless of altitude
FYI - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octane_rating

Specifically -

United States: in the Rocky Mountain (high altitude) states, 85 AKI is the minimum octane, and 91 AKI is the maximum octane available in fuel[citation needed]. The reason for this is that in higher-altitude areas, a typical naturally-aspirated engine draws in less air mass per cycle due to the reduced density of the atmosphere. This directly translates to less fuel and reduced absolute compression in the cylinder, therefore deterring knock. It is safe to fill up a carbureted car that normally takes 87 AKI fuel at sea level with 85 AKI fuel in the mountains, but at sea level the fuel may cause damage to the engine. A disadvantage to this strategy is that most turbocharged vehicles are unable to produce full power, even when using the "premium" 91 AKI fuel. In some east coast states, up to 94 AKI is available [1]. In parts of the Midwest (primarily Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois and Missouri) ethanol-based E-85 fuel with 105 AKI is available [2]. Often, filling stations near US racing tracks will offer higher octane levels such as 100 AKI[citation needed] . California fuel stations will offer 87, 89, and 91 AKI octane fuels, and at some stations, 100 AKI or higher octane, sold as racing fuel. Until summer 2001 before the phase-out of methyl tert-butyl ether aka MTBE as an octane enhancer additive, 92 AKI was offered in lieu of 91.

Regarding "[citation needed]"- all pumps that I've ever seen in Colorado have 85 octane stickers on regular gas and 89 for premium. I've not seen 91 octane in Colorado but I also have not specifically looked for it.
 

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My '06 V6 is getting right now what I consider to be mediocre mpg - 15-16 mpg specifically

BUT,

1. It is cold now.

2. I frequently idle the car to defrost the windshield in the morning

3. I am using the car almost exclusively for local driving


So go figure - it goes with the territory - nothing wrong with the car.
 

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I've been getting 26-27 MPG for the same reasons as above, however we only let the car idle when very cold outside like this morning which is sub zero for the first time this season. I expect the MPG to drop even more with this cold snap and the fact that we have had our first real snow accumulation this season, snow is never any good for MPG. :(
 
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