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QUOTE (Kameha @ May 10 2010, 12:49 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=321479
Just curious. Do you turn off ESC for making donuts or is there a more practical reason. Thanks
I can't think of any useful reason to turn off ESC.

I suppose it's possible that under certain ice conditions you could get stuck, and turning it off temporarily could help get you going.
 

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I guess the answer is "when you want wheel spin." The only time I want wheel spin is when I launch the car off the line for maximum acceleration (aka drag race), which is almost never.
 

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There's been quite an extensive discussion here about this in the past. Some could swear that without ESC they got better gas mileage, others made all kinds of other claims, none could be really proven. ESC is a SAFETY feature. Why disconnect it, unless for the certain specific unusual situation mentioned above.
 

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I have turned it off on a number of occasions during the winter when starting on an incline with snow, or starting in heavy snow. With it turned off you can rev it higher and feather the throttle to get out of the snow or unstuck, because with it on, it limits you.

I also turn it off when I want to "light em' up" lol, but it's only been twice, and it will surprise you.
 

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IMO, ESC is dangerous under certain conditions. I'll give you an example:

When I first got my new 2005 Tucson LX AWD, I was caught in a heavy rainstorm, and just got off the interstate onto an unfamiliar heavily traveled large 2 lane road (one lane in each direction), only to realize I was going in the wrong direction, and had to make a u-turn, on both sides of the road was wet packed gravel, now after having driven for about 45yrs in my life, I know how to drive on gravel, or wet gravel, But, not knowing anything about ESC, I pulled over, and waited for a slight break in traffic both ways, and began my u-turn a bit swiftly, But, as I stepped on the gas a bit, the Tucson just crawled along, then I began to step a bit harder on the gas, again the Tucson just crawled along, panicing now as I was already into the turn, with traffic closing in from both ways, I leaned hard into the gas pedal as the Tucson continued to crawl through the turn, and onto the wet packed gravel on the other side of the road, (I didn't know what was happening, or how to prevent it, or fix it, in my fear, & frustration) and finally with the gas pedal now to the floor the Tucson continued to only crawl completely through the turn at maybe 10mph, as cars were coming at me at 45mph+, from both directions in the rain! And it did this all through the turn, and quite a bit more, even when back on the paved road, until It felt it was finally safe to accelerate! My wife, & I were terrified, & we almost got killed that day, thank goodness the oncoming cars in both lanes slowed up enough to let us in, and avoid hitting us, even though I'm sure they were not happy, & probably calling me an A-hole! My pride was hurt, but at least I was alive! I don't need a car that tries to think for itself, when it could be dead wrong in certain situations like this, so you can bet just about every time I started the car I turned off the ESC, which sometimes is hard to remember, as it comes on by default. Otherwise, on occasion in hard rain, ice, or snow, I would just leave it on, but be well aware of when it was on from that point on. The moral is, ESC sometimes is not your friend!
 

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I only turn off esc at the track. It's a great feature but sometimes it makes me feel like I'm not in total control of the car. At times it's saved me and it's nearly killed me. Our traction control system is quite slow when it comes to reacting when compared to that of my 02' bmw 530i. On the sonata the tires spin for a good 1/3rd of a second and on the bmw the esc doesn't let it even think about squealing the tires.

leave it on unless ur trying to peel/burn out.
 

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Just to add to the chaos don't forget that our cars only have one light for both the ESC and traction control. The "turning it off" for starting out on hills, snow, gravel is a function of the traction control. The ESC (stability control) operates when you are already driving and the computer senses differences in wheel speeds vs. steering angle, yaw rates etc.

My Sequoia has the same thing but seperate lights for when ESC is working or the traction control is working.

In teh manual it does tell you when is appropriate to turn it off and that would be for when you want to induce wheel spin as mentioned. Remember though that the car uses the brakes to help control wheel spin for starting out by transferring torque to the opposite wheel since we don't have a limited slip differential to do that mechanically. let's not even get started on the impact those small round black things have on this especially on snow and ice.
 

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I turn mine off when I'm going up a driveway from almost a dead stop to turn into the driveway during winter. Once power is cut to the wheels and you're half way up a twisting turning driveway with a little bit of snow, you're not going to make it to the top with this feature active.
 

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QUOTE (MikDee @ May 10 2010, 06:39 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=321541
IMO, ESC is dangerous under certain conditions. I'll give you an example:

When I first got my new 2005 Tucson LX AWD, I was caught in a heavy rainstorm, and just got off the interstate onto an unfamiliar heavily traveled large 2 lane road (one lane in each direction), only to realize I was going in the wrong direction, and had to make a u-turn, on both sides of the road was wet packed gravel, now after having driven for about 45yrs in my life, I know how to drive on gravel, or wet gravel, But, not knowing anything about ESC, I pulled over, and waited for a slight break in traffic both ways, and began my u-turn a bit swiftly, But, as I stepped on the gas a bit, the Tucson just crawled along, then I began to step a bit harder on the gas, again the Tucson just crawled along, panicing now as I was already into the turn, with traffic closing in from both ways, I leaned hard into the gas pedal as the Tucson continued to crawl through the turn, and onto the wet packed gravel on the other side of the road, (I didn't know what was happening, or how to prevent it, or fix it, in my fear, & frustration) and finally with the gas pedal now to the floor the Tucson continued to only crawl completely through the turn at maybe 10mph, as cars were coming at me at 45mph+, from both directions in the rain! And it did this all through the turn, and quite a bit more, even when back on the paved road, until It felt it was finally safe to accelerate! My wife, & I were terrified, & we almost got killed that day, thank goodness the oncoming cars in both lanes slowed up enough to let us in, and avoid hitting us, even though I'm sure they were not happy, & probably calling me an A-hole! My pride was hurt, but at least I was alive! I don't need a car that tries to think for itself, when it could be dead wrong in certain situations like this, so you can bet just about every time I started the car I turned off the ESC, which sometimes is hard to remember, as it comes on by default. Otherwise, on occasion in hard rain, ice, or snow, I would just leave it on, but be well aware of when it was on from that point on. The moral is, ESC sometimes is not your friend!


How exactly did you plan on making a swift you turn in rain, on gravel, with wheels turned, swiftly with heavy oncoming traffic? ESC did was it was supposed to. Some times it cam interfere if you know what your doing but it always doesn't, good to know what features you have on your car to avoid this.
 

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The moral of the story here is don't make u-turns on "heavily traveled" two lane roads in the middle of a wet night using WET GRAVEL as a launching pad while cars barrel towards you at speeds upwards of 45 miles per hour.

IMO, stupidity is far more dangerous than the ESC system. You might think the car did too much thinking, but methinks you didn't do ENOUGH thinking. Just my honest two cents.
 

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QUOTE (dcjwlee @ May 12 2010, 01:08 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=322009
The moral of the story here is don't make u-turns on "heavily traveled" two lane roads in the middle of a wet night using WET GRAVEL as a launching pad while cars barrel towards you at speeds upwards of 45 miles per hour.

IMO, stupidity is far more dangerous than the ESC system. You might think the car did too much thinking, but methinks you didn't do ENOUGH thinking. Just my honest two cents.
Hey, dcjwlee, welcome back, and I MUST say it's quite a SURPRISE, and a good one, reading your words of caution, promoting safe driving! You must be getting OLD, man! :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
 

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Someone do this test because my friend and I can't agree on this.

When he turns the ESC off (with the windows open), he says he hears a differen exhaust note. As if the car sounds a lot better; when accelerating. It's nothing like an old school mustang; but I think because he is looking for the increased sound he hears it.

I turned of the ESC in an open parking lot in the snow... lots of fun. Nothing like my old school wrangler (because there is also the fear of tipping over).
 

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QUOTE (yjbeach @ May 13 2010, 07:43 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=322464
Someone do this test because my friend and I can't agree on this.

When he turns the ESC off (with the windows open), he says he hears a different exhaust note. As if the car sounds a lot better; when accelerating. It's nothing like an old school mustang; but I think because he is looking for the increased sound he hears it.

I turned of the ESC in an open parking lot in the snow... lots of fun. Nothing like my old school wrangler (because there is also the fear of tipping over).
Your friend is hearing exactly what he wants to hear as you stated, I've had it on/off, windows up/down, partial/full throttle and it sounds exactly the same.

One of Tirerack's tests they did with winter tires had this.

"This test measured each tire's wheel spin during hard acceleration without traction control or throttle modulation by the driver. An onboard accelerometer measures the longitudinal force as a wheel speed sensor measures slip at the drive wheels. Scores were generated by graphing acceleration force over wheel spin and calculating the area under the curve for 9-60% wheel spin.

A close look at the data revealed all of the Studless Ice and Snow tires we tested developed very similar acceleration levels, with increasing acceleration force as wheel spin increased, with all reaching a plateau around 45% slip. Less wheel spin generated lower acceleration force while wheel spin greater than 45% produced gradually declining acceleration force. This shows how turning off the traction control in certain situations when using Studless Ice and Snow winter tires can be helpful, such as when trying to maintain vehicle momentum when churning through deep snow or when attempting to get a vehicle unstuck by rocking it back and forth. Most vehicle traction control systems will not allow enough wheel spin to utilize a winter tire's peak acceleration traction found at relatively high wheel spin levels."

So there you go why you might want to turn it off. My Sequoia has to be in 4WD WITH the center diff locked to turn it off which is not supposed to be done on dry ground as it allows no slip difference between the front and rear and can damage the drive line. Now if somebody :whistling: HAPPENED to unplug the fluid level sensor OR put a switch in to read a low fluid it would disable all the electronic aid systems in 2WD to allow all the fluid for brakes thinking you were low. Now I just need to install a Limited Slip Diff or even better E-locker or ARB for when I want that locked option.
 

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I read a lot of posts in this thread about being able to spin the tires with the TC/ESC feature turned off. Which makes me think mine might be broken? I can spin the tires on dry pavement without even trying. Just attempting to get into traffic from a dead stop. Should the TC/ESC be preventing this? I was disappointed when I first got the car because I am accidentally spinning all the time and I thought the TC/ESC would prevent that. Is it supposed to or not?

It works perfectly in snow and ice. I can floor it and the car just crawls along at 1500rpm/5mph or whatever the tires will handle. But on dry or wet pavement it doesn't seem to do anything.
 
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