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Discussion Starter #1
Considering the weather we had last winter, and predicted more of the same, I am thinking of getting
a pair of spare wheels for my wifes I10 and fitting proper snow tyres. Everywhere is hilly around here!

Does anyone know if earlier Hyundai (Getz etc) steel wheels - or any other FWD for that matter - that have the same PCD and offset?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Master_Tech.

Thanks for that, I'll se if I can source a pair of steel wheels. (Although I suspect me lady would object to scuffy on her little friend!)
 

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QUOTE (vincentr @ Aug 29 2010, 06:42 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=352706
Considering the weather we had last winter, and predicted more of the same, I am thinking of getting
a pair of spare wheels for my wifes I10 and fitting proper snow tyres. Everywhere is hilly around here!

Does anyone know if earlier Hyundai (Getz etc) steel wheels - or any other FWD for that matter - that have the same PCD and offset?
I think that's a good idea.
Just changing the fronts would hopefully be enough with a front wheel drive car.
What's PCD and offset ?
I wonder if Hyundai sell a set of wheels with snow tyres fitted a set of four would do two cars right.
 

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QUOTE (vincentr @ Aug 29 2010, 11:42 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=352706
Considering the weather we had last winter, and predicted more of the same, I am thinking of getting
a pair of spare wheels for my wifes I10 and fitting proper snow tyres. Everywhere is hilly around here!

Does anyone know if earlier Hyundai (Getz etc) steel wheels - or any other FWD for that matter - that have the same PCD and offset?

Sorry for the number of posts this evening but I'm on a roll. Snow tyres? good idea. I used to live in southern Germany and snow tyres are mandatory by law during the winter months. Everyone always bleets that we (UK) are unable to handle a small amount of snow whereas Europeans don't seem to notice and don't even use salt on their roads, or even clear them properly. You wouldn't believe how much better snow tyres perform than normal tyres.

Which brings me to the point. Has anyone managed to extract a price for 2 x bog standard steel rims from Hyundai? I'm only going to fit to the front wheels as the snow won't be as bad as in Europe. I've been on at my local dealer three times now and they never ring back and always treat my next enquiry as a new one and need the whole concept explaining every time.
Regards,
Jon
 

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QUOTE (vincentr @ Aug 29 2010, 11:42 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=352706
Considering the weather we had last winter, and predicted more of the same, I am thinking of getting
a pair of spare wheels for my wifes I10 and fitting proper snow tyres. Everywhere is hilly around here!

Does anyone know if earlier Hyundai (Getz etc) steel wheels - or any other FWD for that matter - that have the same PCD and offset?
I fitted winter tyres on my i10 last year and I would recommend them. The whole thing turned out to be a lot more trouble than I thought it would be, but still definately worth it.

I got a set of 4 tyres ready fitted on steel rims from www.mytyres.co.uk. (From what I've read it's not a good idea to just fit 2, because that upsets the handing - especially if the front tyres have more grip than the rear ones when braking :eek: ) When I first went to the site there was a good selection of 165/60 R14 75T winter tyres there, but when I ordered them they were not available. When I went back to the website most of them had been taken off, only a few expensive ones remained. So I ended up getting 155/70 R13 75T which I think are the same profile originally fitted on steel wheels on the 1.1 i10 in the UK.

I then had a lot of trouble getting the alloy wheels off because of the stupid locking wheel nuts. The locking wheel nut adaptor stripped and I had to go to a tyre place and get then to remove the locking wheel nuts and replace them with ordinary ones.

I asked my Hyundai dealer about wheel trims for steel wheels but they were a silly price, and the special wheel nuts you have to get with them were even worse, about £4.50 each if I remember correctly.

I got a set of cheap wheel trims from Halfords, but they wouldn't fit over the chromed and domed alloy wheel nuts, so I got a set of 16 12mm x 1.5, open ended plain wheel nuts at 50p each (plus P & P) from www.mistertee.co.uk.

The tyres give a softer ride than the originals, with a slight under-steer on corners, but way better grip in low temperatures and on mud, slush or snow. I took them off again in the spring, but looking at the frost this morning it will soon be time for them to go back on...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
AdrianD - thanks for the websites.

Which tyres did you end up buying? I'm always a bit dubious buying cheap, often Asian, tyres as they just dont seem to have the grip of
European tyres. My favourites generally are Continentals (or their cheaper brand - Semperit) as they have always worked well for me.
They also seem to generally do very well in tyre tests for what use they are.

I can imagine that something as relatively specialised as Winter tyres could vary greatly in their performance. (cheaper rubber polymers
simply not working very well at freezing tempreratures etc.)
 

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QUOTE (vincentr @ Oct 18 2010, 10:39 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=364311
AdrianD - thanks for the websites.

Which tyres did you end up buying? I'm always a bit dubious buying cheap, often Asian, tyres as they just dont seem to have the grip of
European tyres. My favourites generally are Continentals (or their cheaper brand - Semperit) as they have always worked well for me.
They also seem to generally do very well in tyre tests for what use they are.

I can imagine that something as relatively specialised as Winter tyres could vary greatly in their performance. (cheaper rubber polymers
simply not working very well at freezing tempreratures etc.)
I ended up with "Maxxis MA-PW M+S marking 155/70 R13 75T". They were at the lower end of the price scale but not the cheapest - just over £300 including the steel wheels and delivery. I think nowadays there are some quite good Asian tyres around as well as the rubbish ones. The main point of winter tyres is the flexibility at lower temperatures, so anything sold as a winter tyre should be made of a compound that keeps its grip well below zero degrees. Like many things in life I guess its ultimately down to what you want to pay!
 

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My opinion on fitting winter tyres is different to what Adrian described. I can't really see the point. I live in South East where the Winter was 15 days of snow in last 2 years. I used to live in cold country where winter tyres are obligatory, but also people know how to handle winter conditions. Main issue in UK are people going mad when they see 2 inches of melting snow and that includes the idiots spinning their cars around the bends. When the average daily temperature will drop to 0 and when we have 2 months of snow then I will consider winter tyres. Now all you need is a brain. At least to survive the winter down the South- agree Scotland may be different.
 

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QUOTE (scm @ Oct 19 2010, 01:34 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=364472
My opinion on fitting winter tyres is different to what Adrian described. I can't really see the point. I live in South East where the Winter was 15 days of snow in last 2 years. I used to live in cold country where winter tyres are obligatory, but also people know how to handle winter conditions. Main issue in UK are people going mad when they see 2 inches of melting snow and that includes the idiots spinning their cars around the bends. When the average daily temperature will drop to 0 and when we have 2 months of snow then I will consider winter tyres. Now all you need is a brain. At least to survive the winter down the South- agree Scotland may be different.
For me the point is that I do most of my driving (school run and commuting) early in the morning when there is often a heavy frost and after dark in the evening when it's getting cold again. I agree that average daily temperatures in the UK, especially the south, don't go below zero for long periods. But morning and evening temperatures do.

I also agree that a lot of people drive stupidly in bad conditions. But I stand a better chance of avoiding them if I have not only a brain but also tyres with a good grip!
 

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Same as me. I start my work 7am. I know that now there is some sort of lobbying from tyres manufacturers and you can find "expert" opinions like:

"Also there’s no real reason you can’t use winter tyres all year round in the UK."

I understand that as they wear quite fast, are more expensive that summer ones so that would be a dream of all tyre manufacturers. Anyway as I said I don't really thing there is urgency of winter tyres with mild winters, but that is just mine opinion.
 

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Hi all, I'm a big advocate of winter tyres. The main points in their favour I like:

1 Better grip whenever the temp is below approx 8 degrees, because they are made of a compound with a high silica content, which makes them more grippy at lower temps
2 Better grip in snow and ice, due to their having a tread pattern optimised for these conditions
3 Only cost is initial capital outlay. You are still only wearing down one set of tyres at a time. Possibly cost about 300 GBP, if it saves you going into a ditch or worse, saving paying out for your insurance excess, they seem a bargain.
4 At least twice a year, you (if you're a little handy) or your local garage/tyre shop will have the wheels off your car. Any uneven tyre wear, fluid leaks, brake or suspension problems should get noticed, saving problems for the future.

Main points against:

1 Noise. Their tread patterm optimised for snow etc. can make them a little more noisy.
2 Storage. You need to be careful how you store the set not in use. Either hang a couple of shelf brackets, thin bit of wood on top and store them there, or buy a designed tyre rack. Not expensive, Lidl often do then fopr about 6 quid. Abroad, certainly the states/canada, your loc al tyre dealer will often store them for you.
3 People thinking that you're weird. They still haven't caught on in the UK, however in Germany I believe they account for 50% of all tyres bought, I think about 33% for Holland. US, Canada, Scandinavia, most of Europe, pretty much anywhere of our latitude apart from the UK make good use of them, obviously they are all fools and we are right not to bother!

If you do take the plunge, imagine the smile as you pass by the BMW 4x4 with Carlos Fandango alloys, stuck in 2" of snow, as you continue happily on your journey.

Ps I'm not a tyre salesman, but I live in Scotland and work rolling shifts over 24hrs. They've saved me more times than I dare consider.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Which, of course, is the point. Here's hoping the weather will not make them necessary.

However, just a few days of snow, and the proper tyres could make the difference between getting home or not!
 

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Getting home or not is not the matter of tyres. Especially here in Oxford. I have spent few years in eastern country where winter tyres are not obligatory. They are a must in -10 and with 10 inches of snow but the first year I made it on standard summer tyres. Much slower but still. I remember that despite severe conditions many people couldn't be bothered to change their tyres out there.
 
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