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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
HMA service website's instructions:

1.
Warm up the engine, then stop it.
2.
Remove the intake air hose from the throttle body.
3.
Plug the bypass passage inlet of the throttle body.

Make sure the solvent does not enter the by-pass passage.
See large image...
4.
Spray cleaning solvent into the valve through the throttle body intake portand let it soak for about 5 minutes.
5.
Start the engine, race it several times and allow the engine to idle for 1minute.
6.
Repeat Steps 4 and 5.
7.
Unplug the bypass passage inlet.
8.
Attach the intake air hose.
9.
Disconnect the battery ground cable for more than 10 seconds.
10.
Adjust the SAS (Speed Adjusting Screw).

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(This procedure taken from location "SANTAFE(SM) >2003 > G 2.4 DOHC > Fuel System > Engine Control System > Throttle Body > Repair procedures")


My question is, I cannot find the speed (idle?) adjusting screw they are referring to. It is not pointed out on the pictures/diagrams whatsoever and I just don't see it. Am I simply blind and not noticing it or can it be that my vehicle has a throttle position sensor rather than the adjuster screw? (if that's even possible)

Also, is it possible that step 9 and 10 are not even absolutely necessary in a quick spray cleaning? Or maybe step 10 is not recommended for the average joe doing simple maintenance work because you can do more harm than good if you adjust it wrong?

I was unsure about that so I put it on hold and reconnected everything. Just wanted to check with the experienced guys here first.

FYI the car idles high (~2k rpm) upon cold start (regardless of summer heat or winter cold) until the engine warms up and then it slowly goes down to below 1k (about 750 rpm idle speed in neutral when engine is up to temperature) and this is why I wanted to try to clean this. I figured it couldn't hurt and may actually help.



Thanks in advance for any advice or help.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Anyone? Everytime I check for it, I cannot find said adjuster screw.

Is it possible there is no screw (doubt they would make a mistake in the shop manuals...) and that it is simply the computer that will relearn the appropriate idle after it's cleaned up?

thanks
 

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here's a much easier and more effective method:

- pull TB off
- get a can of TB cleaner
- spray down and use a soft brush. even an old toothbrush will do.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
would I not still need to locate this screw afterwards? Or does resetting the battery alone do it?

Also I'm not the biggest mechanically inclined person. I'm sure I could remove the TB with the hma instructions but not so sure I'd be comfortable doing it. Seems there are lots of things hooked up to it and whatnot.


thanks
 

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its not like a carburetor. there isn't really an idle screw, instead there is an idle control valve. do not touch any adjustment screws. those are set from factory and should not be adjusted. there is no battery reset required.

pulling the TB of and putting it back on is quite easy. if you ever get in the situation where you want to do this and you're worried about forgetting a wire or plug, put tape on them like a flag. you can number where they go and remove it only once reconnected. also a flag to show anything you've missed.

only concern i would have is you overtightening the bolts that hold the TB onto the intake manifold...you will not be happy if you break them. as for breaking the gasket, it can be reused but this can happen. i keep a tube of RTV silicone handy. put that on either side of the broken gasket and problem solved. get a new one when you get around to it....if you feel like it.
 

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Flags are a great idea. My neighbor once rebuilt a 3-barrel carb and installed a head gasket on a 1.5 1980 Civic. Tons of vacuum lines. Lots of flags! So, he comes marching out of the house with a white paint stick and starts numbering every connection as he pulls it off. Danged if that idea didn't work during the reassembly! A simple matching of the numbers. Voila!
 

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Flags are a great idea. My neighbor once rebuilt a 3-barrel carb and installed a head gasket on a 1.5 1980 Civic. Tons of vacuum lines. Lots of flags! So, he comes marching out of the house with a white paint stick and starts numbering every connection as he pulls it off. Danged if that idea didn't work during the reassembly! A simple matching of the numbers. Voila!
You could also take a photo with your cell phone before you take it apart and when you have it partially disassembled so you can see where everything connects.
 
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