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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Let's see, over the past year we have had the following issues.:

Ball Joints
Lift gate struts
Driver side window not working
Fan/Blower switch
Air Bag passenger side occupancy sensor
A/C compressor seized
Tire exploded on the interstate last week like something from a Nascar race (Tires still have good tread).
Might be forgetting some things.

Now, we have a coolant leak (probably radiator) and a misfire (probably coil) on cylinder 1 (happened on the same day out of the blue). She has about 150k on her. Love her but might be time to retire her. 2005 SantaFe GLS
 

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Well, sad to say, but at 150K and 13 years things do wear out and start breaking. That is a long life for an A/C compressor. Hint on the window, the electric motors can get a build up of oil/grease and motor brush dust and quit working. If mechanically inclined you may be able to remove the motor, clean it out, and get it going again. Had to do this on dad's voyager van.

Did the 05 use individual coils, or a coil pack? If individual, swap with another cylinder and see if the problem follows the coil.

If those were the original lift gate gas charged struts I am VERY impressed!

Good luck to you, sir.
 

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If it's a 2.7, I just did the coils/plugs/wires/pcv on mine. They have three coils on a bracket thus making a coil pack. You can replace the individual coils if desired. Removing the radiator fan and upper radiator hose made for lots of room to get the whole pack replaced. You might just need plugs/wires if they haven't been done in a while - i.e. the coils may be just fine. When was the last time for a tune up? Did the mechanic actually do the rear plugs? It seems to me a lot of shops do the front three and *say* they did the back three - knowing you can't check their work. My plugs all were the desirable burnt tan color but they were so old that the gaps had eroded out to around .070 (should be .044). Car ran OK but I got a noticeable power increase with the new plugs/wires. PCV is stupid simple to install at about $7 - mine was somewhat plugged up ao I expect the new one helped some as well.

If your head gaskets are leaking (weeping) oil this is the time to change them out, it's just a few more 10mm bolts and an inexpensive gasket set.

Simple hand tools to do all this:
pliers to grab wire spring-clips holding on electrical connectors
10mm/12mm sockets, ratchet and extensions for everything else
spark plug socket

Radiator is likewise a simple affair on this chassis:
phillips head screwdriver (for plastic hood latch cover on the radiator crossmember)
slip-joint pliers (for the radiator hose clamps and tranny cooler lines)
10mm socket, ratchet and extension for everything else
 

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I can relate, but I got mine for free (2003 2.7L) and at 200k miles I took a leap and performed the following:

Replaced:
- head gaskets and bolts;
- all intake and exhaust valves and stems;
- cam sprocket (after decimating the rear sprocket in a failed timing belt change!)
- entire coil pack, alternator, plug wires and plugs;
- timing belt, water pump, tensioner, and idler pulley;
- radiator and hoses, condenser, expansion valve, compressor, and thermostat;

- brake master cylinder;
- IAC valve;

- control arms and ball joints, front struts/shocks, cv joints, inner and outer tie rod ends, and sway bars.

I have just replaced both exhaust manifolds and the downpipe (?) with catalytic converter with ones from MagnaFlow (this has been the most expensive endeavor by far). I'm also swapping the stock air intake with a Weapon-R short ram.

Basically all the work I've done to this car has become something of a joke between friends, so I've decided to start making all sorts of radical performance upgrades. Rotors are next.

Edit:
Also don't forget all the (non-parts) maintenance that goes into keeping a car going. I've had to replace every single gasket. Then there's the hoses. And o-rings. Resealing the upper oil pan was beyond a pain.
 
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