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I have a 2013 Elantra with 155 000 km, 6 speed manual gearbox.

It was trouble-free until the last year where air conditioning broke, wheel bearing, link kit, had to change the water pump this month. Now, the garage tells me that I will have to change the cable of the transmission for 600$. It just seems that everytime I go to the garage, I get out with a huge bill.

I'm thinking about trading it in for a more reliable japanese car with lower mileage.

My actual is completely paid off, so no monthly payments... But if it costs me hundreds of dollars every three-four months, then it's like a monthly payment.

Should I hope that big repairs have been done and that my car will be good for at least two-three years without any major problems, or would it be best to trade-in my car while it's still worth something and get a better car that hopefully will cost less in repairs but be stuck with a monthly payment?
 

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That's a decision only you can make.


$600 for a shifter cable? Never had to replace one, but that sounds high.
 

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Sort of unusual repairs for the mileage although I had an A/C compressor go at 38,000 miles.

It is not worth much as it stands now so unless you develop power train issues I would keep it. Especially since no payments etc. you are ahead of the game if repair free for 6-12 months.
 

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I went the route of keeping a 1999 Saturn bought used at 72,000 miles and sold at 274,000 miles. For me 200k was when most things needed to be replaced like engine, struts, mounts, compressor, etc. It made financial sense to keep the car since I could do most maintenance.

After my Saturn loan I decided to only buy what I could afford and that meant no loans. Only you know your finances and what would be best.

If you do go the route of a Japanese car I would check out forums, reviews, etc. Just because it is a Japanese nameplate does not mean repair free.
 

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Where I live in the UK 155,000km not far short of 100k miles is pretty high mileage and a lot of our roads can damage your vehicle. Depends if you like your car and having spent money on it you really want to benefit from that yourself. I've not long exchanged a car that was built in 2009. I owned it for seven years and looked after it and saved every service bill. I felt like a change purely because wanted something a lot younger so I got a two year old Hyundai still under guarantee. My old car was put on the lot after just needing a wash at twice the amount they gave me for it. Makes me think now why was I stupid to have the discs and pads changed and the brake fluid, coolant, battery, tyres, wipers I should have left all that and traded it in and let the dealer pay for all that.
It's always hard to make a decision and it can go either way the car you have can give you another five years trouble free or the newer one you buy might be a lemon that somebody has caned or had bodyshop work done.
Me I hate monthly payments and if you can't afford to buy another car outright keep the one you have because once fit it will save you money every year.
Get another opinion on the cable from another garage if it's necessary work it may pay you to buy the cable and get the other garage to fit it.
 
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Cars get old and parts wear out and usually those parts can be replaced much cheaper than the payment on a new car. While the new car smell is tempting, it fades and it will wear out just the same. I'm at 105,000 miles (169,000 km) and despite a few little issues here and there, the car continues to be very reliable. Heck, I'm still on the factory front brake pads.

My goal is to get her to 250,000 miles as a daily driver and then retire her. I'd like to keep her though as she was my first new car purchased with my own money. :)
 

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There has been a lot of good advice given here. Costs associated with vehicle ownership makes for an interesting graph. An inverted bell curve would be the best description. Early on there are no repair costs as the vehicle is covered by warranty. You pretty much pay for maintenance items only, and that cost is pretty constant throughout the ownership of the car.

But, you have to pay for the bugger, either in a big cash dump or through monthly payments.

Then in the low portion of the inverted bell curve, you have paid off the car, may still have warranty or at least not paying for high mileage repair bills, and still paying normal maintenance costs. You are in the "sweet spot" of vehicle ownership.

Alas, you then enter the later portion of the bell curve where the beast is paid for, but stuff is wearing out and/or breaking. No payments, but more frequent repairs. This is where you have to decide if the money going into the car is less than the money going into a payment on a car with a warranty.

Toss in the emotional part of the equation; is the old buggy ugly and you don't like it anymore? Then disregard the above, suck it up, and start writing checks to the loan company. :)
 

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Always get second and third opinion.. dont tell next shop about previous shop.. State your concern if there is a valid concern, and let them diag..

M/T shift cable... 29yr old Toyota in my drive and the 2 cables smooth as day I bought it,, get a little stiff in cold, but come back when engine heat and cabin heat warm them up..

Are you stating the problems,, or is the shop "PHISHING" ??
 

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Always get second and third opinion.. dont tell next shop about previous shop.. State your concern if there is a valid concern, and let them diag..
If you remember any advice from this thread, this should be it.
 
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