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The engine and cabin air filters are super easy to pull out and check on the Sonatas. Just switch them out whenever they look dirty regardless of mileage. I have a paint brush in the garage that I use to remove leaves and any larger debris from the filters between replacements.

In terms of transmission fluid, I plan to change it at 60,000 miles just for peace of mind sake.

I replaced the sparkplugs on my 2011 Sonata at 60,000 miles even though they still looked great. No difference in performance or gas mileage. On my 2019 Sonata I will check them at 60K and put them back in if they still look fresh.

One big thing to replace that is not mentioned by Hyundai is the PCV vallve. At 60,000 miles on the 2011 it became clogged and I began losing oil on highway trips. Cheap and easy to replace yourself. Check YouTube for the procedure.

When you replace the brake pads also flush and replace the brake fluid, if you really want to keep the Sonata going trouble free for a long time

I had my cooling system flushed and the coolant replaced at the severe service interval at the Hyundai dealership. The service tech chuckled when I asked him to use distilled water (which I supplied) instead of tapwater to add to the coolant. This helps the additives in the coolant to last longer and reduces scale in the system. It is hard nowadays to tell when a hose is about to fail due to age, so anything that keeps me off the side of the road is worth a little effort.

If this extra maintenance sounds a little expensive, it is initially. I've done spreadsheet comparisons on corporate aircraft maintenance and in the medium to long term a well maintained airplane is cheaper to operate because of fewer repairs.

Also, I got at least $1000 more on trade with my stack of dealership service records. Properly maintained cars are rare and go for a premium. The salesman called a few of his contacts looking for a good used car and my 2011 was resold the day I traded it in.
Glad you said something about the the PCV valve, My brother bought a brand new Ford Excursion last year and when they brought it in for service the found it was almost 2 quarts low of oil. They topped it of and kept an eye on it and it was a new vehicle using oil. Needless to say my brother was pissed! He then made them keep it to find out what was going on and in his case the PCV valve was defective causing it to use oil! I agree , Always use use distilled water in radiators to keep the chlorine and minerals from breaking the coolant down! I run Pennzoil full synthetic in my 2018 sonata and have it changed at the dealer, I furnish the oil and they furnish the filter and service. Bought it new in 2018 but only have 16,000 miles on it. I could hear the motor get quieter after the first oil change at 5,000 miles.
 

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This is certainly an interesting take. I would love to see some actual science and data on that. We should all never change air filters bc they get more efficient with more dirt! Who knew! Haha jk
Maybe here:
.

 

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Maybe here:
.


Nice find! Found the link above on their website as well; it is certainly an interesting read. The company notes service life of an air filter can only be measured with some sort of gauge and not with a visual inspection, which in a technical sense is absolutely true. In a practical sense I'm not sure what that means to the average car owner. I don't think you are hurting your engine or making things "worse" in reality by changing your air filter every 15k miles vs 30k miles. The air filter will work very well regardless but I stand corrected on the technical side of this.
 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
The engine and cabin air filters are super easy to pull out and check on the Sonatas. Just switch them out whenever they look dirty regardless of mileage. I have a paint brush in the garage that I use to remove leaves and any larger debris from the filters between replacements.

In terms of transmission fluid, I plan to change it at 60,000 miles just for peace of mind sake.

I replaced the sparkplugs on my 2011 Sonata at 60,000 miles even though they still looked great. No difference in performance or gas mileage. On my 2019 Sonata I will check them at 60K and put them back in if they still look fresh.

One big thing to replace that is not mentioned by Hyundai is the PCV vallve. At 60,000 miles on the 2011 it became clogged and I began losing oil on highway trips. Cheap and easy to replace yourself. Check YouTube for the procedure.

When you replace the brake pads also flush and replace the brake fluid, if you really want to keep the Sonata going trouble free for a long time

I had my cooling system flushed and the coolant replaced at the severe service interval at the Hyundai dealership. The service tech chuckled when I asked him to use distilled water (which I supplied) instead of tapwater to add to the coolant. This helps the additives in the coolant to last longer and reduces scale in the system. It is hard nowadays to tell when a hose is about to fail due to age, so anything that keeps me off the side of the road is worth a little effort.

If this extra maintenance sounds a little expensive, it is initially. I've done spreadsheet comparisons on corporate aircraft maintenance and in the medium to long term a well maintained airplane is cheaper to operate because of fewer repairs.

Also, I got at least $1000 more on trade with my stack of dealership service records. Properly maintained cars are rare and go for a premium. The salesman called a few of his contacts looking for a good used car and my 2011 was resold the day I traded it in.

Thanks for all of the recommendations everyone! I adjusted my schedules. Now changing a PCV valve at about 50k (wasn't doing it at first). Changing a radiator cap and draining the coolant every 30k instead of waiting until 120k. Looking at IVD cleaning, doing the engine air filter at 15k and tranny fluid at 30k (instead of 60k) and spark plugs at 80k along with changing the break fluid when I do the pads / rotors.
 

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Does this fit the Sonata? Is it a good price?
DIY costs,
Antifreeze 1 gallon, 50/50 premix, cost $8 - $11 USD, 3-4 yrs drain refill service
Radiator Cap, Cost $3 - $25, 3-4 yrs replacement
Oil, 5 qts, API SN Plus / ILSAC GF5 and API SP / ILSAC GF6A, full synthetic 5w-20, $12-$15
Oil Filter, Gen. Hyundai, $7, 3K-4K oil change or every 6 months.
Al-crush washer, Hyundai drain plug, $2.50
Transmission fluid, Full Synthetic ATF, 4 qt x 2 or $18-$25 x 2 every 3 yrs or 36,000 miles
(too difficult to access trans pan bolts and change filter, therefore drain/refill, 36K)
Differential Gear Oil, 75W-90 full synthetic with friction modifiers, 1qt, $12-$15, 3yr, 36K

Spark Plugs, NGK Iridium, Mini-Tune, clean de-carbon, gap, reinstall, 1st 5yrs, 50K,
2nd, mini-tune, 7 yrs, 75-80K, clean, de-carbon, gap, change boots, connector, reinstall, 3rd 10 yrs, plugs still looked good, de-carbon, gap, reinstall

Air Filter, Replace after driving in desert and sand storm, twice in 2 weeks. Replace after sandy wind storm and fire smoke. Normal service every year, 10-12K, $7-$20.
 

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Thanks for all of the recommendations everyone! I adjusted my schedules. Now changing a PCV valve at about 50k (wasn't doing it at first). Changing a radiator cap and draining the coolant every 30k instead of waiting until 120k. Looking at IVD cleaning, doing the engine air filter at 15k and tranny fluid at 30k (instead of 60k) and spark plugs at 80k along with changing the break fluid when I do the pads / rotors.
Typically, It’s only the front brakes at 60K-80K and complete brake flush. Rear brakes last 120K from my experience. So 120K brake service is front/rear and parking brakes, rotors New rotors $30 ea. and remachining rotors were $75 (not worth using thin rotors.) flush brake fluids.

On 2013 Sonata Hybrid, 93K, only the rear brakes and flush. The front brake are still 1/2 and brake rotors have very little wear. Hybrid regen. Braking.
 

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German cars have recommended brake fluid changes about every two years. Why? Because it puts a ton of money in the dealership's pockets at very little expense.
On Hyundai, the difference you will notice in changing out the brake fluid is...none.
The benefit, however is...oh yeah, none. Take a class in hydraulics.

When we all had iron-block engines, it was crucial to use distilled water when mixing with radiator fluid. Otherwise you got severe rust. I still do it, at 100,000 miles, with aluminum block engines, but I'm not so sure distilled is really necessary anymore.
 

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Nice find! Found the link above on their website as well; it is certainly an interesting read. The company notes service life of an air filter can only be measured with some sort of gauge and not with a visual inspection, which in a technical sense is absolutely true. In a practical sense I'm not sure what that means to the average car owner. I don't think you are hurting your engine or making things "worse" in reality by changing your air filter every 15k miles vs 30k miles. The air filter will work very well regardless but I stand corrected on the technical side of this.
Yes this is absolutely True. That is why all the heavy duty trucks have a “manometer” which measures the vacuum in the intake manifold. Heaven Duty trucks are used on farms. They sit for long times and work in dusty planting and harvest. The air cleaning interval is not determined by time or mileage, it’s determined by vacuum pressure drop. When the air filter is dirty, they service it. That can be 24 hrs on a farm equipment. You can buy the “manometer” and adapt it to your Hyundai, after the air cleaner filter. Sometimes you can just drill a est. 1” hole on top of your air box and put the vacuum gage. It turns orange and red when you have to change the filter.
 

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German cars have recommended brake fluid changes about every two years. Why? Because it puts a ton of money in the dealership's pockets at very little expense.
On Hyundai, the difference you will notice in changing out the brake fluid is...none.
The benefit, however is...oh yeah, none. Take a class in hydraulics.
As a former professional mechanic and hobbyist I've seen first-hand what old filthy brake fluid does to the components of the braking system. Brake lines, calipers, master cylinders, and wheel cylinders that rust from the inside out. Rubber brake hoses that clog up, etc. There's so many articles written about why the braking system should be flushed at regular intervals.
 

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German cars have recommended brake fluid changes about every two years. Why? Because it puts a ton of money in the dealership's pockets at very little expense.
On Hyundai, the difference you will notice in changing out the brake fluid is...none.
The benefit, however is...oh yeah, none. Take a class in hydraulics.
Here in the south-ish with high humidity the brake fluid becomes hygroscopic in about 2 years. Very noticeable with color change. I change brake fluid every two years.
 

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German cars have recommended brake fluid changes about every two years. Why? Because it puts a ton of money in the dealership's pockets at very little expense.
On Hyundai, the difference you will notice in changing out the brake fluid is...none.
The benefit, however is...oh yeah, none. Take a class in hydraulics.

When we all had iron-block engines, it was crucial to use distilled water when mixing with radiator fluid. Otherwise you got severe rust. I still do it, at 100,000 miles, with aluminum block engines, but I'm not so sure distilled is really necessary anymore.
Dearest Fool, All cars have converted to Dot 3 and Dot4 back in 2006. The brake fluid need to be changed because the fluid pick up moisture from air and brake fluid deteriorate when repeatly heated and cooled in calipers. After performing a full flush, the first thing you will notice is the brake peddle feel more firm. The brake fluid needs to be flushed in every car, because since 2006 vehicles started putting traction control and roll over protection using the ABS. This became law in 2012. All car companies beat this dead-line in 2010. The vehicles ABS traction control and roll over protection require clean fluid. Therefore flushing your brake fluid with DOT 3 or DOT 4 is a must perform maintenance item.

Guess why all dealer service perform a “electrical resistance” test of brake fluid when you get an oil change or tune up. The resistance test is to test for moisture in brake fluid and old brake fluid becoming acidic after heat cycle from application of brakes.

The Dot 3 and Dot 4 brake fluid do not care which vehicle it is installed into. It will brake-down and collect moisture when it wants too.
 

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To those posting “not required” to change brake fluid. What are you saving - old brake fluid?
DOT3 brake fluid cost $10 - $15 a quart. A damaged ABS cost nearly $1,000 and $1,500 to $2,000 to have the unit replace and calibrated to your cars ECU. Your cars ABS operates the traction control and roll-over protection and cars braking.

Brake Fluid DOT 3 $15 vs Damaged ABS $2,000 and recalibration by dealer
 

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German cars have recommended brake fluid changes about every two years. Why? Because it puts a ton of money in the dealership's pockets at very little expense.
On Hyundai, the difference you will notice in changing out the brake fluid is...none.
The benefit, however is...oh yeah, none. Take a class in hydraulics.
I'll bet the word 'hygroscopic' was mentioned somewhere in your "Hydraulics Class"

When we all had iron-block engines, it was crucial to use distilled water when mixing with radiator fluid. Otherwise you got severe rust. I still do it, at 100,000 miles, with aluminum block engines, but I'm not so sure distilled is really necessary anymore.
Much on-going lab discussions on the 'pos' and 'cons' of using distilled water, "...since it no longer contains its own minerals, it has a tendency to pull them from whatever it touches to maintain a balance."
 

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Typically, It’s only the front brakes at 60K-80K and complete brake flush. Rear brakes last 120K from my experience. So 120K brake service is front/rear and parking brakes, rotors New rotors $30 ea. and remachining rotors were $75 (not worth using thin rotors.) flush brake fluids.

On 2013 Sonata Hybrid, 93K, only the rear brakes and flush. The front brake are still 1/2 and brake rotors have very little wear. Hybrid regen. Braking.
I had my front brakes and rotors changed recently, does that usually include changing the fluid?
I just wanna make sure if my fluid was changed or not.
 

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Much on-going lab discussions on the 'pos' and 'cons' of using distilled water, "...since it no longer contains its own minerals, it has a tendency to pull them from whatever it touches to maintain a balance."
Never heard that...only if consumed, it takes from wherever it can in the body! ;)
 

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Dearest Hyundai Owners,

How many of you have encountered, “OLD OIL COLLECTORS” and “USED FLUID SAVERS”?

Every time, people on this forum attempt to discuss,”Severe Service Maintenance“, the “OLD OIL COLLECTORS” and “USED FLUID SAVERS”, promote keeping old oil and fluids in the vehicle beyond it’s life span! Damage our vehicles!

I attempted to discuss the newest oil specification and testing (API SP / ILSAC GF6A), to improve our vehicles, to extend engine life,

... and some silly person who owns a VW diesel gets on the forum, promoted VW diesel oil with ridiculously long oil changes, for our Hyundais? Diesel oils are not recommended for gas with ethanol.

I attempted to comment on Automatic Transmission fluid change and severe service interval, ...and ”OLD FLUID SAVERS”, claimed ridiculous service intervals or not changing the ATF fluids at all.

Between my neighbor and I we have 5 - Hyundais with 72K to 285K+ miles. Three of the vehicles are on the engine recall list 93K, 2017 w/180K+ and 2015 w/285K.

Hyundai/Kia/Genesis will migrate technology to Toyota, Lexus, BMW, Mercedes, the engine will have a float, oil pressure sensor that measure oil impedance. These sensor are already placed in many vehicles. The computer record the date, time, mileage, when the oil level float dropped to zero and when the oil pressure/impedance sensor detect the oil filter was removed. No more fake oil/filter changes. Remember sensors can detect 87 to premium 91 or E85. Why Toyota, Lexus, BMW, Mercedes, etc. deny warranty, their car computers can actually tell when the engine fluids were changed, did the owner over-rev the engine, etc.. How do service mechanics check brake fluid, electrical resistance! The ABS systems already can detect when Brake fluids goes bad, records the date and mileage!

So if you want to claim warranty. Not only do you have to save the service receipt, your car is recording all the service events and time-stamping the date.
 

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Dearest Hyundai Owners,

How many of you have encountered, “OLD OIL COLLECTORS” and “USED FLUID SAVERS”?
Ray, I understand that you are old and retired (I'm most likely older than you), but I find your posts long and tedious...please get to the point and don't repeat yourself so often. Thanks! ;)
 

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I had my front brakes and rotors changed recently, does that usually include changing the fluid?
I just wanna make sure if my fluid was changed or not.
The dealer service, good mechanics and DIY, will perform a complete brake flush. It is because, new vehicles since 2006 (and required 2011) have ABS, traction and stability control To change the brake pads, the caliper pistons need to be pushed inward, this can force dirty brake fluid into the ABS. New vehicles require brake flush, before servicing the brake pad, or the ABS can fail from contaminated brake fluid. Therefore it is prudent to perform a complete brake flush.
 

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My vehicles are 9 yrs and 12 yrs old. I able to perform a manual “slow” brake bleed/flush.

The new vehicles might require a dealer diagnosis computer to activate the ABS during the brake fluid flush, ABS reset and calibration.

My Neighbor with 2015 (280K+ miles) and 2017 (180K+ miles) performed ”slow” brake bleed/flush, without any problems, ABS function in rain and firm up his brake peddle feel. He did multiple brake jobs on his vehicles, typically around 60k-70k before his brake pads and rotors were worn-out.
 
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