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It's been snowing a lot where I live (3 inches) and there's salt being put on the roads for traction. The temperature is close to 5 degrees so car washes are not working at the moment. Any idea on how long it takes for salt to damage the underside of the car? I reckon it'll be at least 3-4 days till I can get it washed. I've only driven twice so far in the snow (couldn't resist the urge lol)

Must also add that I don't have hoist at the car wash so whatever I do is by hand with the spray, should I be too worried?
 

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Salt only works at temperatures above 25ºF or so which means right now it's not hurting anything but washing it with warm water right now would bring it back up to an effective temperature and allow it to 'activate' so to speak. Personally I'd wait until after it thaws out and you get the first proper rain to wash all the salt off the road, then go clean your car.
 
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After the slush is mostly off the roads, I do a couple passes wish a pressure washer and get the undercarriage. I don’t use soap for this. When the snow is melting and water is back on the roads I’ll spray it down again. I have my own pressure wash so it makes this easier. I’ll wash it once there are no more hazards to mess up the clean surface. I use a liquid sealant every time I wash in the winter.

If there is snow and water on the roads for more than two weeks and I can’t get a dry spell, I will proceed with washing and waxing. I’ve been known to hand wash my car in the snow a lot. If it is above 20 degrees, I’ll get down and do it.
 

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It's been snowing a lot where I live (3 inches) and there's salt being put on the roads for traction. The temperature is close to 5 degrees so car washes are not working at the moment. Any idea on how long it takes for salt to damage the underside of the car? I reckon it'll be at least 3-4 days till I can get it washed. I've only driven twice so far in the snow (couldn't resist the urge lol)

Must also add that I don't have hoist at the car wash so whatever I do is by hand with the spray, should I be too worried?
Start worrying in ~8 years...although Hyundais seem better at repelling rust than Toyotas or Nissans, and about equal with Honda.
 

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You should get the salt off as soon as practical. It's not just the body of the car but all the other parts especially brakes. Example, We had rain changing to freezing rain on Friday and they hit the roads with salt so I got a good blast on the way home from work. I drove the car for the first time yesterday. I released the parking brake and started to back out of the garage. The usual slow release of the clutch resulted in no movement. So a little more gas and it broke loose. The pads had rusted to the rotors. For a mile down the road, there was an ungodly grinding from the brakes until I finally just nailed them. So it only took two days for rust to form. The sooner you get it off, the better. Make sure you spray the wheel wells, exhaust, and brake/fuel lines.

Now, if they use brine where you live and you drive through wet brine, go directly to the car wash, don't stop for beer, and make sure the undercarriage is thoroughly washed.
 

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It is around 6 degrees tonight and high of 25 tomorrow. I planned to wash my car Thursday after it is above freezing. There is only so much you can do. I like the old saying don't sweat the small stuff.

I would just wash the car and hose off the bottom when temps are higher.
 

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You should get the salt off as soon as practical. It's not just the body of the car but all the other parts especially brakes. Example, We had rain changing to freezing rain on Friday and they hit the roads with salt so I got a good blast on the way home from work. I drove the car for the first time yesterday. I released the parking brake and started to back out of the garage. The usual slow release of the clutch resulted in no movement. So a little more gas and it broke loose. The pads had rusted to the rotors. For a mile down the road, there was an ungodly grinding from the brakes until I finally just nailed them. So it only took two days for rust to form. The sooner you get it off, the better. Make sure you spray the wheel wells, exhaust, and brake/fuel lines.

Now, if they use brine where you live and you drive through wet brine, go directly to the car wash, don't stop for beer, and make sure the undercarriage is thoroughly washed.
It is around 6 degrees tonight and high of 25 tomorrow. I planned to wash my car Thursday after it is above freezing. There is only so much you can do. I like the old saying don't sweat the small stuff.

I would just wash the car and hose off the bottom when temps are higher.
That "brine" is some nasty sh:eek:t! More corrosive than salt, and it "paints" itself to your car.

I was driving home this afternoon when the snow was just starting, and thinking, "Good Grief! I hope it isn't *ME* I'm smelling!" :eek: when it dawned on me they had pretreated the roads on my way in.
 

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I wouldn't worry too much about the salt. Cars, in general, are far more corrosion resistant than decades ago. I drove my 2001 Elantra through 11 winters in Upstate New York, and it only showed minimal surface corrosion by the time I traded it in. As suggested, rinse it off in the car wash as soon as the temperature rises close to or above freezing. If using the self-service wand, you should flush out the wheel wells also.
 
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