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I was trying to do some touchups on my black paint. I bought a matching touch up paint bottle from automotivetouchup.com (clear coat and base coat). Since I wanted to take care of the rusted spots first, I started sanding down to bare metal, applied base coat (no primer), then applied clear coat on top. The blending was horrible since I applied it using the brush applicator that came with the bottle. I ended up having to sand down the clear coat (since it was uneven with the base clear coat). Then I polished and waxed the area by hand. I could still see scratches from where I sanded to blend the clear coat, so I figured I needed an orbital. I was planning on getting one to do a full compound, polish and wax since the car is 5 years old. However, I just went to go clean the area with isopropyl alcohol before applying another coat, and the paint completely came off on the cotton ball. What could I have done wrong? Maybe I didn't sand using the proper grit before applying the paint... or maybe it was because I didn't use primer? Could it be something wrong with the paint? I let it dry for 3 days before I messed with it again.

Any advice would be helpful, as I am at the point where I just want the bare metal surfaces to be protected.
 

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Put Some primer on it in the mean time and keep the metal protected from moisture. Absolutely no form of wax of any kind anywhere near the areas for you will cry tears later. Black is the worst pain in the ass color to fix that I can think of and it’s nearly impossible to do perfectly if it’s in a highly visible area. What kind of paint did they send you is it touch up in a little glass jar or is a little can of paint they can be sprayed?.

Honestly you probably better to do your feather edging and sanding yourself and getting it all ready then find out any pain or if you know or shops that are wanting a small quickie job like that. It shouldn’t cost more than a couple hundred dollars depending or maybe even 100 if the guys shoving it in his pocket off the books. It ain’t rocket science to them but they get the techniques and the extra additives to try to blend that stuff and then the end may have to paint the whole panelSimply because that’s the nature of the newer types of paint. It all depends and they can make the judgment call on that lot better than you can. It wouldn’t be very hard if you had any other color but black but you can get away with a lot way down low but not so much up higher and not much at all open the hood that’s just the way it is. Just remember party Shack can either be hungry I was looking to screw you over every way they can so don’t fall for that it’s so technical nonsense of paying big big bucks, at least call around it but somebody just get a look at it. Good luck.
 

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Put Some primer on it in the mean time and keep the metal protected from moisture. Absolutely no form of wax of any kind anywhere near the areas for you will cry tears later. Black is the worst pain in the ass color to fix that I can think of and it’s nearly impossible to do perfectly if it’s in a highly visible area. What kind of paint did they send you is it touch up in a little glass jar or is a little can of paint they can be sprayed?.

Honestly you probably better to do your feather edging and sanding yourself and getting it all ready then find out any pain or if you know or shops that are wanting a small quickie job like that. It shouldn’t cost more than a couple hundred dollars depending or maybe even 100 if the guys shoving it in his pocket off the books. It ain’t rocket science to them but they get the techniques and the extra additives to try to blend that stuff and then the end may have to paint the whole panelSimply because that’s the nature of the newer types of paint. It all depends and they can make the judgment call on that lot better than you can. It wouldn’t be very hard if you had any other color but black but you can get away with a lot way down low but not so much up higher and not much at all open the hood that’s just the way it is. Just remember party Shack can either be hungry I was looking to screw you over every way they can so don’t fall for that it’s so technical nonsense of paying big big bucks, at least call around it but somebody just get a look at it. Good luck.

It was the touchup in a glass bottle jar. I was thinking about purchasing from another vendor and this time going with spray paint.
 

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I am doing some research and it seems that latex-based paint comes off with alcohol. Since the surrounding paint didn't come off with the alcohol, does this mean that the base paint is oil-based. In that case should I get oil-based paint to fill the hole on the car?
 

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It was the touchup in a glass bottle jar. I was thinking about purchasing from another vendor and this time going with spray paint.
It was the touchup in a glass bottle jar. I was thinking about purchasing from another vendor and this time going with spray paint.
If you decide to get a pro to put the paint on for you it’s better to let him get what he likes to use. If you’re gonna have a stab at it yourself get the paint code before you go looking . It’s usually on a sticker someplace like the trunk lid, glove box or radiator support. Base coat clear coat like the car comes with is the way to go. Snap a couple pics of the work youve done getting it ready. The counter guy can tell from that how much paint you need.
Like I said black is a bitch so getting a painter to shoot it is gonna get you the best job especially if the spots are in different places ( often are?) and up over wheel wells up where it’s right in your face. Just remember when you’re sanding to get it down to 400 grit to finish. If your fingers can feel anything it will show up glaringly in the finished paint. The edges of your primer shouldn’t look like sharp edges but rather smooth flowing blended contours you can’t feel with your finger. Flowing water over it when you think it’s done will show problems just like the paint will for a good visual reference. If it’s not perfect keep adding finishing putty and prime the low spots till it’s smooth. A little practice and you’ll be all set. Do your sanding with a small block of wood or rubber sanding block so you get a smooth finish without finger ripples.
 

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Primer first, then:


This is what I do with my 2014 Monaco White EGT:

1. Clean the area around the chip, say 3" circle or so. Really clean, no surface stuff at all.

2. Put a small, as in as small as you can, spot of the touch up paint in the chip. make sure it fully fills the chip and slightly overflows the edges. Leave it for the day.

3. Repeat step 2. And leave it again, for the day. Don't worry about the edges where you have overflow, that will be taken care of in the following steps.

Stay with me here, and don't freak out. I promise this works.

4. Using 2000 grit 3M wet sandpaper and a spray bottle of water, wet the chip area down and gently sand the area of the chip and about an inch or so around it. Don't push down hard, just light, circular motion while keeping the area wet. The raised edge of the touch up paint will slowly sand down flush with the original paint. Your touch up paint is "softer" than the original clear coat and will feather in quite easily. Once the overflowed paint is level with the original you are done sanding. Now clean the area where you were working to be sure there is no residue from the sanding. Yes, the clear coat will be hazy where you were sanding, but in the next step that will disappear.

5. Apply McGuire's Mirror Glaze #2 (or equivalent) to a soft, dry, clean cloth and rub the hazy area in a circular motion. Not a lot of pressure. Just hum your favorite song and rub to the beat. Periodically wipe the area clean and soon you will see that the haze is gone, the repair is smooth and flush with the surrounding area, and the paint is squeaky clean.

6. Apply your preferred wax and admire your work!

I have used this technique on several chips on my car and I challenge folks to find the repair, even when I narrow it down to a one square foot area to check. And while the steps look time consuming, the total time of actual work per chip is maybe 15 minutes tops, just spread over 3 days. It gets quicker as you do more, and where you have several chips you can take each through the steps in sequence and repair multiples in the same three days.

On a happier thought, we may get the chips here in the Lone Star State, but we also get to drive our fine rides at 85MPH (TH130) without worry of citations! Have fun!

 

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First off, you NEVER NEVER sand ANYTHING down to the metal on any car that is not a beater. Because if you don't have highend quality painting equipment and some skill, your paint touch up will look like you were sleeping or stone cold drunk when you did this. Paint repair on a nice quality car takes practice and skill and very high quality paint products that can be only purchased at a auto paint suppliers. NOT at the auto parts store.



When I fix chips in my car that the chip goes down to the metal, I use acid prep from an autobody supply store and drip it in the inside of the chip with a toothpick and let that work on the rust. You can also use "Navel Jelly" acid prep from the auto store. Then I clean it out with water and use air to speed dry it. Then I use a toothpick to install a very thin bit of primer INSIDE the chip. Let it dry with a fan on it for 30 mins. Then toothpick the final color of paint inside the chip. While it may not be perfectly smooth it won't look like a "butcher job" of taking down the paint to the metal that an unskilled person who has never done "correct" painting of a car.



Case in point: at work in our front reception area, our company took down a huge sign that was taped up. It pulled all the paper and some drywall out all over the wall at tape points. I was busy at the time and could not do the wall prep and paint. They had a warehouse guy that said he could do it and filled and sand the wall and paint. What a mess, he fixed just the tape areas and did not spend time blending the dry wall patch and just painted that small area over the patch. Paint changes color after 1 year. You must paint the whole wall, not just patches. This is even more critical on a cars paint. With a skilled practiced person with high quality paints and correct prep, white would be the exception where you could patch and not fully paint and have an ok/so so outcome. But then you have the clearcoat to worry about too. You are better off treating inside the chip and leaving your "good " paint alone , other wise get it fixed by a pro so you don't have a "butchered" outcome.

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Automotive paints are mostly Urethane based. You did what I did the first time by probably saturating whatever you were using then rubbing or at least putting the iso-alcohol directly on the touch up paint. Isopropyl will dissolve and 'gel' the touch-up even if it has been on your car for a year. What you want to do is dilute it or get actual paint leveling fluid such as [ame]https://www.amazon.com/Langka-LANGKA-2oz-Blob-Eliminator/dp/B000BAT622/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8[/ame] and quickly and gently go over what you filled. Any prolonged and direct exposure will remove your touch up.

Also, invest a few $'s and get a detail brush set (ideally with #0 and #1 brushes). Use those rather than the one that comes with your touch up tube.

I too have used the fine-grit wet sanding method with good results. If you're just looking to simply prevent rust and if rust currently is not in the chip, get the chip prepped by removing any other loose pieces and using isopropyl to de-grease. Use above methods for filling. If you want to go the extra step, put some clear coat on top and let cure before trying to knock it down a bit. For finishing effect, you'd ideally want to use a cutting compound with a dual-action polisher then proceed with polishing and waxing.

With any touch up, it's not going to be 100% so don't even think that at least the first few times it will look perfect. Main thing you're doing is preventing rust and further issues. And if you take your time, layer the coats and try to blend it in the best you can, that's probably as good as it's going to get. Yes, professional refinishing takes a lot of time and practice.

If you care that much about your car, just take it to get professionally painted and/or detailed. It's a Hyundai, not a Ferrari...
 
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