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I have had experiences both where the Krown effected the rubber and when it didn't. It seems to come down to two things: the makeup of the rubber, (often differs from manufacturer) and the location of the seal. The hood seal seems to be the worst effected because it sits in the oil the most. On our cars, the only seal I was worried about was the lower door seals. There is also a silicone they are supposed to spray on the rubber before application to repel the oil, which they did when I went. That again comes down to the applicator. I have since wiped the rubber several times to keep the oil from sitting on and soaking into it.
 

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All the "issues' and such discussed are why Hyundai only endorses and uses the ValuGard rust product. They use in on all "recalls" regarding corossion repairs, etc. It is the only one you can find that meets and exceeds the SAE and ASTM standards. None of the others mentioned have such strong documented, tested, etc endorsements.
 

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I have to update. The xl was sprayed two weeks ago and after several wiping of the door rubbers, it seems at least the two passenger door seals are starting to rinkle along the bottom. I washed them tonight with dish soap and water to try and cut the oil, but it may be too late. I'm thinking that Krown may officially not be the better choice anymore with the increased use of plastics and rubbers. Next year I may be taking my grand am to be my guinea pig for a corrosion free application. If that works out, I may have to take the xl. I would like to find the best alternative for rust proofing before I buy my next new car in a year or so. T'is a sad day for Krown....
 

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Only "one" rust inhibitor/preventative/proofing is approved and used by Hyundai for their vehicles in North America.
For a "very good reason". Like, you would not use any "oil" for your oil changes if it did not meet SAE specs, right?
The one that is available, through selected dealers and application centers, in North America, US and Canada is ValuGard.
If you check the many technical repair bulletins issued by Hyundai for the corrosion repairs of suspension concerns, it is ValuGard, not Krown, not any of the others.
Why, very simple, no other meets or exceeds the tested, documented and published testing by SAE and ASTM for proven performance. Check out the Hyundai and other vehicle manufacturer's TSB, "repair procedures" etc at ValuGard.net under the "engineers" section.
It may make you rethink what you have been buying.
 

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Simple really, these products are not tested or approved by Hyundai. Only ValuGard is approved and required for repairs by Hyundai.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I have to update. The xl was sprayed two weeks ago and after several wiping of the door rubbers, it seems at least the two passenger door seals are starting to rinkle along the bottom. I washed them tonight with dish soap and water to try and cut the oil, but it may be too late. I'm thinking that Krown may officially not be the better choice anymore with the increased use of plastics and rubbers. Next year I may be taking my grand am to be my guinea pig for a corrosion free application. If that works out, I may have to take the xl. I would like to find the best alternative for rust proofing before I buy my next new car in a year or so. T'is a sad day for Krown....
Sorry to hear. But suggest you go back to the Krown shop and try to get them to reimburse to have the rubber seals replaced. Else, you could start to hear wind noise with poor seals.

I think you and I both agree that application is key. So if you do go Corrosion free, find a good small shop and keep far away from crappy tire.
 

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Honestly i think it's a big waste of money to rust proof cars today. Yes the vehicle's I've owned back in the 70's and 80's and even very early 90's would show rust within 5yrs or earlier but that doesn't happen anymore. One of the vehicle's i own now is 12yrs old and is rust free and i live in NE Ohio. They've made changes to protect today's vehicle's from rusting as they would in the past. I came across this article that explains what im trying to say http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2013/03/should-you-rust-proof-your-new-car.html the shops that do rustproofing will obviously tell you it's necessary but i really disagree.

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Honestly i think it's a big waste of money to rust proof cars today. Yes the vehicle's I've owned back in the 70's and 80's and even very early 90's would show rust within 5yrs or earlier but that doesn't happen anymore. One of the vehicle's i own now is 12yrs old and is rust free and i live in NE Ohio. They've made changes to protect today's vehicle's from rusting as they would in the past. I came across this article that explains what im trying to say Should You Rust Proof Your New Car? | AutoGuide.com News the shops that do rustproofing will obviously tell you it's necessary but i really disagree.

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Have not rustproofed any of my vehicles either and I think the newer vehicles do have improved paints-application techniques that will improve the longevity of our vehicles but hey.. what it comes down to is time, only time will tell :)
 

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Sorry to hear. But suggest you go back to the Krown shop and try to get them to reimburse to have the rubber seals replaced. Else, you could start to hear wind noise with poor seals.

I think you and I both agree that application is key. So if you do go Corrosion free, find a good small shop and keep far away from crappy tire.
I'll wait till the spring. It will only get worse as the oil sets in. Then I'llget kKrown to replace them and consider corrosion free.

Regarding no oil spray, I do agree that today's cars are treated and painted better, but perhaps the rust that causes the worst damage is that to the undercarriage and mechanical.
 

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I'll wait till the spring. It will only get worse as the oil sets in. Then I'llget kKrown to replace them and consider corrosion free.

Regarding no oil spray, I do agree that today's cars are treated and painted better, but perhaps the rust that causes the worst damage is that to the undercarriage and mechanical.
I see you are in Whitby. Most of the folks who apply Corrosion Free in Durham region are Canadian Tire shops which I strongly recommend you avoid. I have hear various horror stories (not all rustproofing related though) about the Cdn Tire shops around here....I ignored them when I did rustproofing and paid the price.

If you go to Corrosion Free's website you will notice that there is a guy in Oshawa that does it. Last year when I applied CF I had a hard time getting in to see him as he was really busy. The next closest place is somewhere in Scarborough.

I am taking my Kia to Mississaugua next week as Robinson's is supposed to be a top-notch installer. When I had my issues with Canadian Tire, the Corrosion Free rep suggested that I go there if it was possible, but it was not at the time. I'll try to make the trip every 18 months though.
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
Honestly i think it's a big waste of money to rust proof cars today. Yes the vehicle's I've owned back in the 70's and 80's and even very early 90's would show rust within 5yrs or earlier but that doesn't happen anymore. One of the vehicle's i own now is 12yrs old and is rust free and i live in NE Ohio. They've made changes to protect today's vehicle's from rusting as they would in the past. I came across this article that explains what im trying to say Should You Rust Proof Your New Car? | AutoGuide.com News the shops that do rustproofing will obviously tell you it's necessary but i really disagree.

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That's your opinion and you're entitled to it. But as blunt as I may sound...you're wrong. In my the neck of the woods where cars are subjected to wicked amount of salty water (from road salt) for 4-5 months of the year, water that gets into every nook and cranny, it is not uncommon to see the dreaded rust streaked paint on cars that are 4-7 yrs old. Furthermore, all you need to do is read forums about cars showing signs of rust, sometimes minor even, within the first few years of ownership. I can tell you that many Toyota Highlander owners complained of seeing rust within the first couple of years of ownership (2008-2010 model years). I rustproofed my 2009 and never saw any.

The thing you need to consider is that it's not so much the visible surfaces that I would be concerned about. It's places like the bottoms of inside of fenders or door panels or rear trunk/hatch, where that nasty salty water sits and slowly penetrates the metal seams for months on end. All you need is a small imperfection in the paint, coating or seam, and it will eat away until you see that rust bubble on the outside of the panel. A good rustproofing coats the metal and prevents that from happening.

Like anything, it is risk management. For me, given the conditions vehicles are subjected to, it is a risk I am not willing to take. It is a relatively inexpensive investment, and up here, it really does add to resale value...people buying used cars will pay more for one that has been maintained with rustproofing. Or at the very least, all things being equal, they will choose one that has been rustproofed over one that has not.
 

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Yeah luck11 you've brought up some valid points but overall i still think it's unnecessary in my opinion. I think a good majority of people don't take the time to thoroughly wash their vehicles during the winter months which would prevent most rust problems. I personally wash all my vehicle's in my garage every weekend during winter. I fire up my kerosene torpedo heater and it gets nice and toasty in the garage no matter how cold it is outside and people don't take the time to do the inside of doors, trunk, hood, fuel door and under the vehicle. As far as resale price being better on rust proofed vehicle's i disagree with that also. I don't recall ever seeing anybody selling a car put the fact that the car is rust proofed in the description of the vehicle. Maybe it's different in Canada i don't know. If people feel better about getting rustproofing that's perfectly fine, go for it. :)

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Discussion Starter #33
Yeah luck11 you've brought up some valid points but overall i still think it's unnecessary in my opinion. I think a good majority of people don't take the time to thoroughly wash their vehicles during the winter months which would prevent most rust problems. I personally wash all my vehicle's in my garage every weekend during winter. I fire up my kerosene torpedo heater and it gets nice and toasty in the garage no matter how cold it is outside and people don't take the time to do the inside of doors, trunk, hood, fuel door and under the vehicle.
Most don't, because the value of their time, the cost utilities to heat and light a garage, water, or they don't have the facilities to do so.

Also, I think you missed my point about the location of rust. I too wash my car in the garage with a heater. I also have hot and cold taps in my garage. AND I too open my doors and use a separate mitt to clean around the doors, bottoms etc. But, that is unlikely to be the source of rust. It's the kind that comes from the inside out for which rust proofing provides greatest benefit....by coating areas that you CANNOT wash...like INSIDE the door or quarter panels or hatch....unless you make it habit of pulling of door panels etc when you wash your car. Fact is, that salt water gets in there and sits, and needs lots of water to flush it out.

As far as resale price being better on rust proofed vehicle's i disagree with that also. I don't recall ever seeing anybody selling a car put the fact that the car is rust proofed in the description of the vehicle. Maybe it's different in Canada i don't know. If people feel better about getting rustproofing that's perfectly fine, go for it. :)

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You may not "recall", but I experienced it first hand when I sold my 2009 Highlander to buy my SF XL. The guy chose mine, even though it was 8 months older and more expensive than another he was considering, because mine had rustproofing. He told me that outright. He offered me $200 under my asking. Never expected to get that price. So yes, it does make a difference. In fact, when my son get his first car, one of the criteria in my book (given that it will be used and at least 4-5 years old) will be that it has been rust proofed. I would be willing to pay a premium for a rust proofed car over one that has not because it provides peace of mind that it won't rust away a year or two later.
 

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My 05 Montana sold for $6500 when it's competitors were selling for 2k less. The guy that bought it told me "well there are some others out there with lower mileage for less". To which . Replied "go look at some, iI bet the rockers are rotted out". He bought the van 2 days later at my asking price.

Btw, when it is very cold in the winter, and there is salt on the car you are actually better to leave the salt on it. The way you described washing it in a heated garage actually activates the corrosive properties of the salt and water mixed., and gives it the proper temperature to do so. Which is why spring is actually when rust blooms, warmer temps, salt, water = corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Btw, when it is very cold in the winter, and there is salt on the car you are actually better to leave the salt on it. The way you described washing it in a heated garage actually activates the corrosive properties of the salt and water mixed., and gives it the proper temperature to do so. Which is why spring is actually when rust blooms, warmer temps, salt, water = corrosion.
Yes, absolutely agree. But I cannot have my vehicle dirty all winter, and I don't let anything touch my paint except my microfibre mitt.

I only heat my garage for the hour or two I wash it. Then I dry it, squeegie water off floor, and pop the garage open to cool it right back down again and let any remaining water evaporate. I do this only occasionally because it's too much effort. But I will do it if weather forecasts a good stretch of nice weather where roads will be dry. I normally get off what I can at a local spray wash without any brush, and use the opportunity to flush the underbody as well.

Been doing this for 15+ years without issue.
 

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My 05 Montana sold for $6500 when it's competitors were selling for 2k less. The guy that bought it told me "well there are some others out there with lower mileage for less". To which . Replied "go look at some, iI bet the rockers are rotted out". He bought the van 2 days later at my asking price.

Btw, when it is very cold in the winter, and there is salt on the car you are actually better to leave the salt on it. The way you described washing it in a heated garage actually activates the corrosive properties of the salt and water mixed., and gives it the proper temperature to do so. Which is why spring is actually when rust blooms, warmer temps, salt, water = corrosion.
Its not better just to leave the salt caked on your vehicle. It's best to thoroughly wash your vehicle once a week during winter. The longer the salt is on the harder it is to get at it. My garage isn't heated which wouldn't be good i agree, i turn on my torpedo heater for my comfort while washing and i use my air compressor to blow water out of areas to prevent doors, locks, fuel door etc from freezing up. Been doing it for years with all my vehicle's so i have my routine down pat. (my wife thinks im nuts, maybe i am but it is what it is). I see nothing wrong with rustproofing, i just don't feel it's necessary for me.

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Discussion Starter #38 (Edited)
Yep. On inside the rear doors on the rear fenders. Plugs are hardly noticeable, and smaller than the plugs I had from Krown (but that was a few years ago...they may have changed). The rest was accessed using existing holes (including drain holes) and plugs. Rocker panel area was accessed by removing the door sills.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
I thought about taking the sill plate out but figured after a few years it would break. Justlet them drill.
Actually, I pulled mine the night before my rustproofing appt. Really easy. Held in with a few plastic clips. I used a plexi chisel of sorts (home made) to get under one end, pop it out, and continue down the length of the sill with the piece of plexi. If I recall correctly, there wer 4 clips. I would not try it in the cold though, since cold plastic tends to crack.
 
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