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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i am curious especially with 2011 owners as to what they intend to do or already may have done as far as replacing the brake fluid in their vehicles? i have read that 2 year replacement intervals are recommended.two years sounds quite often to me.would the location of where the owner resides affect this interval?(temperature,humidity.) also ,has anyone perfomed a simple gravity brake bleeding? (time is not a issue.)thanks for any input.
 

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My 2011 Sonata is 4 years old and I plan to have it replaced sometime before its 5 years old. I don't know where you heard that it should be replaced at 2 years? I don't recall seeing that recommendation in the owner's manual. Regardless I believe 4 or 5 years is about the right time, unless you have really high mileage, or have replaced pads a couple times. I would recommend having it done by a shop with the proper equipment to make the change. In my opinion its not a do it yourself project. Some people could handle the job, not everyone. I do not think its a good idea for the gravity bleed. With the present brake systems such as the Sonata it should be pressure bleed.

My XG350 is now 10 years old and it was changed out about 4 years ago and I've not had a problem. Its due for replacement of fluid now.

Brake fluid needs to be replaced because water collects in the fluid, perhaps due to condensation and the water decreases the quality of the fluid for braking and prolonging seals in the brake system parts. No doubt there are other reasons for replacing the fluid.

BTY. I attended United Township High in East Moline across the river from
Davenport. Were you raised in the area?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
relace brake fluid

thanks for your input Bobb 4484.i am thinking dealer service at around 4 years.i think the pressure bleed is the way to go for the ABS.(i grew up in maquoketa ,ia. ,40 miles north of quad cities.
 

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Many manufacturers are recommending brake fluid replacement at the two year mark. Not sure about Hyundai. I've gone five years on other cars with no known issues.
 

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I like seeing light fluid. Once the color starts changing, it all goes. make sure to get all four corners.
same for me here. brake fluid is kind of difficult to figure out when to flush the stuff. depends on driving conditions, environmental conditions, etc. its mostly due to moisture content as mentioned here.

only alternative is to get a tool that measures moisture content in brake fluid...i have seen them, unsure on cost.
 

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Several years ago a gentleman who was a senior engineer at Fed Mogul in the Ford SD brake testing division said he would change brake fluid every two years because that ensures you don't have any moisture issues. Like others have indicated probably going no longer than 4 years would be O.K. for the less OCD inclined people like myself. One aspect of this and it could depend on the exact brake configuration, but realize that normal procedures WILL NOT change the fluid in the anti-lock part of the system which is fairly involved to do and he said for the normal JOE to just accept that limitation. They don't have to consider that limitation since they basically tear the whole system apart many times during their independent testing and certification tests for FMVSS certifications on behalf of FOMCO.

Larry
 

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I don't disagree with changing the fluid but has anyone ever heard of a brake failure due to not changing the fluid? Yes, I have had brake lines break but due to corrosion from the outside-salt etc. not from lack of changing the fluid. One can also do the syphon method if one can get to the fluid in the reservoir just suck some out every month or so and you will gradually change out the fluid. Not as good as a flush but it works.
 

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I don't disagree with changing the fluid but has anyone ever heard of a brake failure due to not changing the fluid? Yes, I have had brake lines break but due to corrosion from the outside-salt etc. not from lack of changing the fluid. One can also do the syphon method if one can get to the fluid in the reservoir just suck some out every month or so and you will gradually change out the fluid. Not as good as a flush but it works.
As the hygroscopic brake fluid absorbs water over time, the boiling point changes. How much water absorbed obviously is up for debate and how long it take to gets there. But if the boiling point drops far enough, you can vaporize the fluid and drastically change your breaking ability. This should not be a sky is falling type read as how many systems have reached this point? However its good maintenance to flush the brake fluid every couple years as water is absorbed into brake fluid it will remain there unless burnt off.

The brake system isn't a recirculating system so just adding to the top does not insure that it reaches the areas by the wheels. There is some turbulent flow as you apply and release your brakes but the nastiest stuff is by your wheels (most important to change) and the cleanest stuff is up by your reservoir.
 

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The water in the fluid will corrode the internal parts too
 

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Yes, brake fluid does get gunky after a lot of years. Had some old cars with clogged lines in the past. I just use the turkey baster method of changing fluid. Just suck out whatever you can from the reservoir and replace it with clean. Keeps my fluid clean enough so I never have to worry about gunk. Same with my clutch. Takes about two minutes once or twice a year.
 

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+1 :thumbsup: The turkey baster is about the quickest way I know of to get that old stuff out of the master cylinder reservoir. I did the exact same thing on some other vehicles.

Some of you might/might not want to try this: I asked the wife if I could "borrow" hers from the kitchen. She asked why. I don't need to describe the glance I got back as her response. No words, just "the look."

Sometimes you just have to fire one across their bow to see if they're paying attention. Trust me, they are. Besides, it gives them material to talk about when they get together with their girlfriends.
 

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Yes, brake fluid does get gunky after a lot of years. Had some old cars with clogged lines in the past. I just use the turkey baster method of changing fluid. Just suck out whatever you can from the reservoir and replace it with clean. Keeps my fluid clean enough so I never have to worry about gunk. Same with my clutch. Takes about two minutes once or twice a year.
This isn't doing much. Like I said, brake systems are NOT circulatory. You are much better off doing a true bleed (which in turn flushes it). Telling people they will be fine just replacing the fluid in the reservoir is very misleading. And I can bet if you brought your car to me and I pulled fluid from the rear caliper/drum it would be black and thick.

You can "refresh" the fluid but its not doing much but making it look pretty topside.
 

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The MC should be emptied with the baster and new fluid added. Then do the flush from the wheels.
 

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+1 :thumbsup: The turkey baster ...

Some of you might/might not want to try this: I asked the wife if I could "borrow" hers from the kitchen. ...
Or, how about the next time you both are dining on a meal it has been used for, mention in passing that you happened to just use it... Caution: Be prepared to duck/dodge/deek flying, possibly sharp objects... :D
 
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Several years ago a gentleman who was a senior engineer at Fed Mogul in the Ford SD brake testing division...
One aspect of this and it could depend on the exact brake configuration, but realize that normal procedures WILL NOT change the fluid in the anti-lock part of the system which is fairly involved to do and he said for the normal JOE to just accept that limitation.
I had a SAAB 9-3 several years ago, whose 2-year brake fluid flush procedure required you to take the car to the dealer. This was specifically so they could activate the ABS valving with their computer, and thus flush it out, too.

For all us regular folk, I suppose we could find a very open and empty stretch of road and do a couple panic stops. Not sure how much that'd do, though.
 

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I've never had a problem flushing with ABS. Most modern ABS (post 1990) are just normally open valves. So the fluid is not trapped anywhere. When the ABS operates it shuts the valves preventing pressure to the brake line.
 

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Among the dozen or so cars I've owned, I've never once changed the brake fluid. And I keep my vehicles 8-10 years each. Had it changed a couple times when the maintenance plan that came with the car requests it. I've never had any brake fluid related problems at all.

IMO, water does not get into a sealed braking system unless there is a break in the system, in which case you have a bigger problem than changing fluid. You stand a better chance of introducing water if you keep fluid for a long time on the shelf, and then decide to do a change. If inclined to change the brake fluid, I would only use fresh, new fluid from a completely FULL, factory sealed container.
 
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