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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I like to do all my own work. I can afford to live that way. This morning I was going to remove my front rotors on my 2009 Hyundai (90,000 miles) to turn them, as I've detected a little pulsing lately. Thankfully I have the 2.4 so I don't have the sticky calipers on the rear. I thought it would be easy because I've gotten used to Toyota Camry and Sienna front ends.

WRONG!

I took off the wheel, the caliper (hung it up to take the tension off the rubber line), got caliper bracket off along with the pads (that still have plenty of life in them, they're originals - I am VERY easy on brakes). I took off the two phillips screws holding the rotor to the hub with an impact driver. No problem.

Then I tried to take off the rotor. Nothing doing. I'm assuming that it's rusted onto the hub. I beat on it with a large rubber mallet. Nothing. I gave up and put it all back together. It works fine.

But this ticks me off. This is poor engineering. :mad:

On the Toyotas my wife could get the rotor off once I take off the wheel, pads and bracket! This is ridiculous. I went to a professional mechanic and he said that beating them with a large, steel hammer is about the only way to remove them...then they're usually ruined.

Thanks Hyundai.

Next car, sooner or later, I'm going back to Toyota.
 

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I'm no Hyundai defender, but this complaint is pretty silly. Rotors get stuck because of rust on many, many vehicles, it's not limited to certain brands.

You could have sprayed penetrating fluid in the screw holes to try to get it between the hub and rotor while you had it apart. That probably would have helped.

When you get it off use high-temp brake grease or anti-seize between the hub and new rotor to prevent this in the future.
 

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If you have alloy wheels this can exacerbate the corrosion. My car has alloys and the dissimilar metals cause more corrosion between the wheel & hub assembly than I'd like. Not much I can do about it. What you'll probably need to do is to spay a rust penetrant, like PB Blaster, into the joint between the rotor & the hub. This will take some effort on your part. You'll need to spray & rotate the rotor until you saturate the joint. It'll probably take more than a single application. Try soaking the joint like this every night for a week, then on the weekend try removing the rotor again. You may have to hit it with a rubber mallet but it should do the trick.

Blaster is highly recommended. It's the only rust penetrant that actually works. I swear by it.

Good Luck
 

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Thanks for the video, I'm going to do the front brakes of my 09 Sonata soon, this info will help a lot. Dealer wanted $350 for a rotor resurface and new pads. I can do new rotors and new Auto7 pads for $100.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
In response

I'm no Hyundai defender, but this complaint is pretty silly. Rotors get stuck because of rust on many, many vehicles, it's not limited to certain brands.

You could have sprayed penetrating fluid in the screw holes to try to get it between the hub and rotor while you had it apart. That probably would have helped.

When you get it off use high-temp brake grease or anti-seize between the hub and new rotor to prevent this in the future.
I don't claim an immunity to stupidity. Anybody my age who would do so proves that he hasn't learned a thing.

I did use penetrating fluid, PB in fact. It wasn't sufficient. My wheels are not alloy. I believe they are plain old steel. I did find the video shown above to be quite instructive. Next time: PB (again) and the #8 1/2" bolts.:D
 

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Rotor removal...

Great video and I love the custom special tools! :D Everyone should have that set in their box!
 

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Dont blame hyundai because you are an incompetent mechanic. A rubber mallet wont do you any good. Take a small sledge or engineers hammer and tap the rotor hat where the wheel makes contact to the rotor. Do this carefully so you dont damage your wheel stud. If all else fails hit that rotor like a man and just replace them ive never came across a brake rotor i couldnt remove.
 

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I have had to use the method shown by the video on multiple vehicles. Works every time! Also, if you don't have a long enough bolt, you can put a shorter bolt with something between the bolt and the rotor. This is what I had to do last time.

That said, I wish that more manufacturers would use the method that old Toyota pickups used. The screw that held the rotor to the hub could be threaded into a hole tapped in the rotor and used to jack the rotor away from the hub. Super simple, and no extra hardware required!
 

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I have had to use the method shown by the video on multiple vehicles. Works every time! Also, if you don't have a long enough bolt, you can put a shorter bolt with something between the bolt and the rotor. This is what I had to do last time.

That said, I wish that more manufacturers would use the method that old Toyota pickups used. The screw that held the rotor to the hub could be threaded into a hole tapped in the rotor and used to jack the rotor away from the hub. Super simple, and no extra hardware required!
Yeah it was nice method; lots of manufacturers used that set up.

Pounding on rotor can shorten wheel bearing life; you are always better with a big three jaw puller or the video method shown.
Cutting with sawzall down to the edge of wheel stud hub also works well if that's the only tool you have.

Bronze anti seize on inside of rotor usually fixes this problem IMO.
 

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Yeah it was nice method; lots of manufacturers used that set up.

Pounding on rotor can shorten wheel bearing life; you are always better with a big three jaw puller or the video method shown.
Cutting with sawzall down to the edge of wheel stud hub also works well if that's the only tool you have.

Bronze anti seize on inside of rotor usually fixes this problem IMO.
I have been doing brakes for over 30 years and never had a problem with the wheel bearings from smacking the rotor with a real...not rubber....hammer. A 3 jaw puller? if the rotor wasnt warped before it will definitely be after using that tool.
 

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I have also worked on cars for decades; and have an industrial trade license although not automotive.

A few wacks from a hammer is no big deal I agree; pounding for half an hour on a seized rotor I avoid.

You could warp a rotor with a three jaw puller, although not likely unless it has hydraulics attached.
The point us get the $30 rotor off , because it's normally junk anyway.
 

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does anyone know the size of the bolts I would need to get to insert it in the holes of the front rotor to get them off.

m8x1.25 works in the front but the back, the bolts are too small.

thank you
 

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That video is too much work.. get a small 2x4 about 10in long and hold it up to the corner of the rotor. Then use a SNAP ON dead blow hammer. Can only be snap on and then start bashing away. Watch your fingers and spray some pb or wd40 first.
 
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