Hyundai Forums banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are the facts/myths about what you should and shouldn't do before the engine warms up fully? Heating, acceleration, that sort of stuff?

I noticed with my new job and dropping temperatures I'm on the highway (speed limit 55) only a few minutes after leaving the parking lot. Should I keep it below a certain RPM level? Should I sit in the parking lot for 5 minutes or more? As of right now the engine doesn't fully warm up til I'm several miles down the road but I don't want to put excessive wear on the engine if I can avoid it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,920 Posts
If you're asking opinions...when extremely cold, I wait for a few minutes at idle, then keep it under 2,000rpm until warm.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hg3300

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,343 Posts
Use synthetic oil and dont worry about it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Red Raspberry

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,704 Posts
Just drive normally without thrashing it. A minute to get the oil fully circulated is more than enough in most (not all) cold areas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
If you live in a cold climate, always use an engine heater (block heater), this enables an easier start and shorter warmup time. (OP never stipulated prevailing climate). The colder the climate, the lower the initial start viscosity required. I run 0W-30 synthetic in winter (I live in a severe climate) but for urban customers' winter operation with little warmup period and short operating times where engine temps/oil temps seldom reach normal operating temperature, I recommend 0W-20. (Theoretically the 0W rating should be the only effective parameter, but the lower 20 rating I believe guarantees more flow under these conditions).

After startup, wait for a few moments for the engine to achieve full lubrication to the engine. In very cold conditions I give the vehicle a minute or two for the oil to fully circulate and begin to warm the oil, then drive slowly to warm the engine. As stated above, maintain slower speeds and lower RPMs until operating temp is reached.

It's erroneous to assume that the vehicle lubricating system is fully warmed up when coolant operating temps reach operational norm, it can take much longer for the oil to reach its operating temperature, and that is what is required. Sonatas now have coolant routed to the oil filter bracket that could assist in warming the oil (and cooling it in warmer weather) but I have never monitored if or how much this assists oil warming or the time required: might be a project for this winter using an infrared temp reader.

PS: Commercial rigs and piston-engine powered aircraft all utilize an oil temperature gauge. I'm a pilot and can assure you that the aircraft oil would reach operating temperature (or as high as could be attained) before takeoff. (Old-timers in the early Twentieth Century used to drain their oil immediately after engine shut down and reheat it before reinstalling it to the engine). Engines are preheated too. I once took off on a -20 degree day without fully warming the engine or the oil. On climbout from the airport my engine suddenly accelerated from 2000 to over 3000 RPM: the engine had momentarily starved for oil and spun up. Now you're not going to crap your pants when your car is starved for oil, but you are going to incur some premature wear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,920 Posts
It's erroneous to assume that the vehicle lubricating system is fully warmed up when coolant operating temps reach operational norm, it can take much longer for the oil to reach its operating temperature...
Good point! (y)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,518 Posts
I've got two oil temp gauges on my Gen Coupe. :) The OE one is for the cam solenoids and at the top of the motor where the oil is hottest and I put in a gauge that has the sender on the oil filter adapter in the oil coming out of the filter. Usually a 10 to 20 F difference with the top one getting hotter.

But it generally takes at least 15 minutes of highway speeds to get the oil up to temp. Hyundai considers it good to go at 150F for my turbo, otherwise it limits boost to 5 psi. I seldom see above 200F with my leisurely driving. It usually runs 10F over the coolant temp in the summer but winter the oil looses a lot of heat off the engine, timing cover especially as it has an oil cooling channel. Thinking about temp insulation tape on the front timing cover where the oil channel is for cold weather use.

If you have an oil filter mount oil heat exchanger above the filter this will cut the oil warm up time in half. I had one for a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have never owned a car with an engine block heater nor would I consider PA to be a cold enough climate to have one. My father had a diesel F-250 with a block heater but that's about all the experience I have with em.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,920 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
845 Posts
I see some good posts already h3300 yes its good to warm up the engine 1-2 minutes of idle or so on a cold day before driving off drive off slowly i see people start there vehicles in winter months from home let them idle in there driveway or at work for 10-15 minutes and drive off fast. AVOID doing this.! because the engine may be warmed up but NOT the

transmission its still cold. stomping on the gas puts extra straine on it. proper way of warming up a vehicle is to waite 1-2 minutes maybe more if its extremelly cold for good oil circulation and then drive away slowly give the engine & transmission time to warm up the vehicles powertrain components your vehicle warms up Quicker when driving away slowly. so be patient.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,259 Posts
I usually don't wait too long before driving off at a reasonable speed, but one item to keep in mind if on a highway quickly after startup, the trans will not shift into overdrive until the trans fluid reaches a certain temp. We're on a highway quickly, so rather than immediately up to 65, I go a little slower until the rpm's drop as the trans shifts to 6th, then proceed as usual.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
We got frost last night so I actually waited maybe 5 minutes til my windshield was clear enough to drive. I did not scrape it but the defroster works pretty well. Yeah I'm careful not to go over 2000 rpms til the engine is warm, though it is hard when I have to get up to 55. At least when I worked in the city I had all the traffic to allow enough time for the engine to warm up.

I have always used the recommended oil as listed on the cap and in the owners manual.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
I see some good posts already h3300 yes its good to warm up the engine 1-2 minutes of idle or so on a cold day before driving off drive off slowly i see people start there vehicles in winter months from home let them idle in there driveway or at work for 10-15 minutes and drive off fast. AVOID doing this.! because the engine may be warmed up but NOT the

transmission its still cold. stomping on the gas puts extra straine on it. proper way of warming up a vehicle is to waite 1-2 minutes maybe more if its extremelly cold for good oil circulation and then drive away slowly give the engine & transmission time to warm up the vehicles powertrain components your vehicle warms up Quicker when driving away slowly. so be patient.
i can voucher that. i once knew a friend that would start and throttle hard on his pontiac grand am, until one day his transmisioin blew. right in the dark dead cold of night. ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,411 Posts
I have a neighbor who had a 1990 stickshift Accord from new.
He would start it and immediately take off wailing on it.
I estimate 3-4k rpm.
After a few years it would also leave a faint trail of blue smoke.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
845 Posts
Hey samonthego hows the car oil light still out.? i remember the Pontiac Grand am not a reliable car from what i remembered it was the typicall slopy made american car back in its era of the day.
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top