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Discussion Starter #1
I have searched old post and read through them all to find the rear camber shims I needed to adjust rear camber/toe. I've looked all over online and cannot find them anymore. Does anyone know where I can buy them or other ones that will fit?

"Louiceman" has a thread that he adjust using the shims. I have them pictures below.


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I have searched old post and read through them all to find the rear camber shims I needed to adjust rear camber/toe. I've looked all over online and cannot find them anymore. Does anyone know where I can buy them or other ones that will fit?

"Louiceman" has a thread that he adjust using the shims. I have them pictures below.


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I'd like to reduce the toe-in on my 2015, but I think that ship has sailed. I wanted to install the camber bolt kit on my 2013 Sonata, but that kit too was discontinued even before the YF itself! smh..

And Hyundai, only Hyundai of all manufacturers, could design in Sonata a car where the REAR camber was readily adjustable, but the front - where adjustment was more important - required a kit! What were they thinking??
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah I know. Alignments are the only thing that's ridiculous on these cars. I might just end up using washers to correct camber and toe like mentioned in another thread. Good luck with yours.
I'd like to reduce the toe-in on my 2015, but I think that ship has sailed. I wanted to install the camber bolt kit on my 2013 Sonata, but that kit too was discontinued even before the YF itself! smh..

And Hyundai, only Hyundai of all manufacturers, could design in Sonata a car where the REAR camber was readily adjustable, but the front - where adjustment was more important - required a kit! What were they thinking??
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Discussion Starter #5

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Discussion Starter #7
Could not get the bolts off that attach the wheel bearing? To the car. Does anyone know how I can get it off? The hub is in the way.

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As I recall, to get the hub off:
1. Park the car on a level surface.
2. Block the front wheels. Do not set the parking brake.
3. Loosen the lug nuts on the selected rear tire.
4. I used a floor jack placed under the rear spring next to the tire to raise the rear tire.
5. Remove the lug nuts and tire.
6. Remove the two bolts securing the disc brake caliper to the axle.
7. Remove the brake caliper and support the caliper on a block of wood.
8. Remove the two screws holding the brake rotor using a large Phillips screwdriver. I needed to press hard on the screwdriver while unscrewing the screws.
9. Remove the brake rotor.
10. Remove the four bolts securing the hub and remove the hub.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
As I recall, to get the hub off:
1. Park the car on a level surface.
2. Block the front wheels. Do not set the parking brake.
3. Loosen the lug nuts on the selected rear tire.
4. I used a floor jack placed under the rear spring next to the tire to raise the rear tire.
5. Remove the lug nuts and tire.
6. Remove the two bolts securing the disc brake caliper to the axle.
7. Remove the brake caliper and support the caliper on a block of wood.
8. Remove the two screws holding the brake rotor using a large Phillips screwdriver. I needed to press hard on the screwdriver while unscrewing the screws.
9. Remove the brake rotor.
10. Remove the four bolts securing the hub and remove the hub.
Wow really detailed. I just can't get the four bolts securing the hub. Like what tools do I use? I tried several things and they would either not fit or would just slip off.

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Discussion Starter #11
I believed I used a box end wrench or a socket wrench with extension through the hole in the hub to remove the 4 bolts.
The bolt isn't accessable through a hole. It's right behind the stud hub? Not sure the name of it. I'll try those tools another day. Should I be careful when removing the hub? Like be cautious of the wheel bearing coming out? What were you doing to have to go through this?

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Rotate the wheel studs to line the hole with each bolt.

The wheel bearing is pressed in and will not fall out.

I removed the hub to add shims to the reduce my rear toe.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Rotate the wheel studs to line the hole with each bolt.

The wheel bearing is pressed in and will not fall out.

I removed the hub to add shims to the reduce my rear toe.
Okay awesome! Thanks again for all of the info. Do you know much inches add to how many degrees? Trying to figure out how what size washers to use instead of having to do trial and error.

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Discussion Starter #14
Here's a printout of my alignment. I took measurements and my toe is actually positive and not negative. Alignment guy said don't even worry about the toe being that off because it's such a small margin. I measured from the top of the shock bolt to the outer rim of each of the wheel and looks like I need about 1/4" to correct it, but I know that correlates different when adding a washer in the hub bolts. How do I measure washer size if I need about 1/4" of outward movement for positive toe?

The photos is just a wheel alignment check. The 0.1 degree of right front camber is off possibly due to something small. I can correct that with camber bolts. Shim/washers to correct toe is a totally different monster.


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Did you look at my thread "Do It Yourself Rear Wheel Alignment"?
https://www.hyundai-forums.com/md-2.../232377-do-yourself-rear-wheel-alignment.html
I described the process I went through to adjust my rear toe.

Looking at your alignment printout, I would not worry about your camber, front or rear. The front toe is ok. The rear toe will eat your tires.

I used 1" by 3" shims to adjust my rear toe. My goal was to reduce the total rear toe to zero. The important measurement is total toe. To reduce the rear toe, I added them on the front side between the hub and the mounting plate.

Using my formula Shim Thickness = 4.2 * tan degrees
Right Side Shim = 4.2 * tan 0.58 = 42 thousandths of an inch thick
Left Side Shim = 4.2 * tan 0.19 = 14 thousandths of an inch thick
 

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Did you look at my thread "Do It Yourself Rear Wheel Alignment"?
https://www.hyundai-forums.com/md-2.../232377-do-yourself-rear-wheel-alignment.html
I described the process I went through to adjust my rear toe.

Looking at your alignment printout, I would not worry about your camber, front or rear. The front toe is ok. The rear toe will eat your tires.

I used 1" by 3" shims to adjust my rear toe. My goal was to reduce the total rear toe to zero. The important measurement is total toe. To reduce the rear toe, I added them on the front side between the hub and the mounting plate.

Using my formula Shim Thickness = 4.2 * tan degrees
Right Side Shim = 4.2 * tan 0.58 = 42 thousandths of an inch thick
Left Side Shim = 4.2 * tan 0.19 = 14 thousandths of an inch thick
A static(stationary) zero degrees rear toe will result in the rear wheels toeing(splaying) at progressively higher speeds. That is the reason positive toe(toe in) was designed into the vehicle. While you do not need one quarter or half degree rear toe in, you should leave in at least one twentieth(0.05) degrees toe-in in the rear.

My ideal rear toe on my 2015 Elantra would be L: +0.05° and R: +0.15°, resulting in a negative thrust angle, to offset the leftward pull designed into modern vehicles. My last alignment showed L: +0.14° and R: +0.28°
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've looked through your thread, but for some reason couldn't figure out the equation. Thank you very much for the reply and doing the math for me. I just went to home Depot to buy steel flashing that looks really think so I'm gonna use a digital caliper to measure the precise thickness I need to correct my toe. Thank you so much again. I ran through two sets of tires at about 24k miles each set. I was wondering why I had to buy tires so often...I can't wait to get this resolved and get new tires to finally have a decent ride.
Did you look at my thread "Do It Yourself Rear Wheel Alignment"?
https://www.hyundai-forums.com/md-2.../232377-do-yourself-rear-wheel-alignment.html
I described the process I went through to adjust my rear toe.

Looking at your alignment printout, I would not worry about your camber, front or rear. The front toe is ok. The rear toe will eat your tires.

I used 1" by 3" shims to adjust my rear toe. My goal was to reduce the total rear toe to zero. The important measurement is total toe. To reduce the rear toe, I added them on the front side between the hub and the mounting plate.

Using my formula Shim Thickness = 4.2 * tan degrees
Right Side Shim = 4.2 * tan 0.58 = 42 thousandths of an inch thick
Left Side Shim = 4.2 * tan 0.19 = 14 thousandths of an inch thick
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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for the info. I'll try not to overshoot to negative toe. What are you doing to resolve your toe issues?
A static(stationary) zero degrees rear toe will result in the rear wheels toeing(splaying) at progressively higher speeds. That is the reason positive toe(toe in) was designed into the vehicle. While you do not need one quarter or half degree rear toe in, you should leave in at least one twentieth(0.05) degrees toe-in in the rear.

My ideal rear toe on my 2015 Elantra would be L: +0.05° and R: +0.15°, resulting in a negative thrust angle, to offset the leftward pull designed into modern vehicles. My last alignment showed L: +0.14° and R: +0.28°
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Thanks for the info. I'll try not to overshoot to negative toe. What are you doing to resolve your toe issues?

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Well let me ask you this: How over-toed-in do you think mine are, compared to yours before, and in general?

Because I'm thinking about leaving well enough alone, although, I'm wondering if the approx. quarter degree rear toe-in might be contributing to my wheel hop over bumpy roads.

First of all, are shims still available for adjusting rear TOE on MD Elantras? I see plenty of rear camber shim kits for MDs, but no hits for anything concerning toe. Other than my rear end hopping up and occasionally knocking communication satellites out of orbit, the car handles and rides fine.

I just keep my rear tire pressure a couple lbs. PSI lower than the fronts, though I know this is not ideal. F: 33 cold, R: 31-32. But if I do decide to have rear toe adjusted, I don't want it to involve drilling any new holes in the car itself.

Basically, I want to reduce the toe-in about 0.05° on both sides, but maintain the difference I brought up above: Slightly more toe in on the right than on left.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well let me ask you this: How over-toed-in do you think mine are, compared to yours before, and in general?

Because I'm thinking about leaving well enough alone, although, I'm wondering if the approx. quarter degree rear toe-in might be contributing to my wheel hop over bumpy roads.

First of all, are shims still available for adjusting rear TOE on MD Elantras? I see plenty of rear camber shim kits for MDs, but no hits for anything concerning toe. Other than my rear end hopping up and occasionally knocking communication satellites out of orbit, the car handles and rides fine.

I just keep my rear tire pressure a couple lbs. PSI lower than the fronts, though I know this is not ideal. F: 33 cold, R: 31-32. But if I do decide to have rear toe adjusted, I don't want it to involve drilling any new holes in the car itself.

Basically, I want to reduce the toe-in about 0.05° on both sides, but maintain the difference I brought up above: Slightly more toe in on the right than on left.
Honestly 0.05 degree isn't going to hurt you. You won't even feel it. Mine toe is really off compared to yours. Your tires will last awhile. I'm lowered so that's probably what threw off my alignment.

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