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2009 Santa Fe

My 2009 Santa Fe needed rear brakes at 45,000 miles.
The front brakes had about 50% left.
Both were original factory issue.
The mechanic that replaced the rear pads said that it was highly unusual that the rear needed replacement before the front.
I grew up understanding that the front brakes were responsible for about 60% of stopping effort.
Mystified as to why back pads needed replacing before the front pads.
Anyone have similar experience?

Safe driving,
San Jose Mike
 

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It's not your calipers per se .. if you remove the stainless steel pad guides/slides and look underneath, ANYTHING that may have built up under there (and you live in a humid, salt air environment down there) can cause the problem. There's blessed little clearance for the pads to move anyway, and it takes next to nothing under the rear guides/slides before the pads bind up and you start wearing out pads and rotors. That's the primary reason for significantly faster wear rear vs. front when it occurs on a Santa Fe. In your climate, I'd recommend pulling and cleaning the surfaces annually. Here's a TSB on the subject, attached:
 

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Rear pads replaced @ 45k Fronts @ 103k

Every car before this I replaced the front pads before the rears. Some cars I never replaced the rears (they were brake shoes)
 

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You've probably never owned a car where the manufacturing tolerances available for the rear pads to slide were so unnecessarily tight, and hence, the requirement to keep things clean and sliding as freely as possible so acute.
 

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Shoes!

"Shoes" oh the good ol days... pissing off all the nieghbors with the mallet trying to get the drums off. Leaky wheel cylinders and lets not forgot those springs. I really hated those things!!

:D:D:D

When replacing pads use a wire wheel bit and brakekleen. Clean the pad bracket and caliper really well just watch out for the O ring on the caliper piston. Remove the slide pins and relube.
 

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rears are prone to stick. have them greased up every 25k as part of service.
mine bound and even tho just a little squeal - nearly cost me my discs as they were getting damaged......
 

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My fronts would always be replaced twice before the rears until I owned a Subaru and a Hyundai. I live in the northern climate and because of snow and salt, rust causes the rear pads to bind and prevents them from releasing completely, which in turn causes wear. Our local Hyundai dealers charge about $80 for a rear end cleaning to be done in the spring.
 

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I don't know about Santa fe but I've done lots of rear pads on VW before the fronts . I would guess material type (softer compound) is a factor
 

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It's a combination of things. 1, Solid rotors heating up the pads. 2, Smaller, thinner pads and also heating up due to rotors. 3, More junk gets kicked up in the rear, so you have more junk that gets on the slides. Here in NY, I do both front and rears every 30K miles even though the fronts can go another 10K or so. Preventive maintenance. Cheap and easy to do a brake job on these 4 wheel discs. Much better than doing drums. But, the rear drums would last longer because junk wouldn't get in them. Gotta take the good with the bad. Better braking = more maintenance. No matter how much you clean and lube the slides, the rear pads still wear out faster than the fronts.
 
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