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I see in my shop manual that there are a couple sensors that throw PO532 and 539 pressure and temp indications.

We have no cool air with none of the three associated fuses blown and no mil.

When I plug in our OBD reader, it basically says no data.

Anyone know of a reader that can actually read the AC codes for a Santa Fe?

All comments/suggestions weilcome!!!

Bruce
 

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Just went through this last year.

Only a scan tool or Hyundai GDS system will read codes in the hvac module. Most AC shops should be able to do this as part of an AC performance test. But the basic OBDII reader will not work.

Is your fan spinning when you turn on the ac at the hvac controls? This is key because if they are then the compressor is working but surely you are leaking refrigerant. If not then the system may have no refrigerant or is refusing to engage due to an electrical issue.

First thing to do is ensure the condenser is clean
Hose it off with the ac turned on and see if the air gets colder.

Next see if there is any refrigerant in the system. Suggest using an ac manifold pressure gauge or just have it checked by an ac shop. If no or low pressures you have a leak in the system and it must be repaired first.

Ensure all electrical connections are secure and wires are not broken. There are 3...one at the control valve on the compressor, one that connects to the wire harness on top of the compressor, and the pressure switch connection on the passenger side near the fender. All must be plugged in.

After this need to eliminate if any of these electrical connections or sensors are bad. The online service manual shows how to measure continuity of the pressure sensor and the compressor control valve. If they are out of spec then replace them. The harness between the control valve and the ECU connector is also replaceable as a single pigtail.

Lastly the compressor itself may be faulty. These are variable compressors with no external clutch. Valve opens closes based on ecu control and determines how much work is required of the compressor. The control valve can be replaced but most shops would rather do a compressor replacement since labor is same. But the compressor is not cheap so be double sure it's not the valve before dropping 500 or more on the compressor vs 70 or so on the valve. Both prices are net of recharging the system.

Hopefully its just the valve stuck closed. Found videos online of how to soak them in diesel fuel to free the valve solenoid or just change them out. But run the diagnostics first!!

I dropped 1400 to get mine nice and chilly again

Sent from my SM-G965U1 using Tapatalk
 

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I see in my shop manual that there are a couple sensors that throw PO532 and 539 pressure and temp indications.
When I plug in our OBD reader, it basically says no data.
What did you use to get those codes?
 

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Drives : Nissan NV200 Flies : Rans S6ES
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Anyone know of a reader that can actually read the AC codes for a Santa Fe?
G-Scan definitely will because it has Hyundai/Kia dealer level software.
Launch X431 series tools probably will.
Foxwell NT520 with the Hyundai software option might.

But any of these tools will probably cost more than having the fault professionally diagnosed at your local AC specialist. Why spend all that money so you can guess what the code means. Just take the car to people who know.

If I helped you fix it, why not...

Your support is greatly appreciated
 
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