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I am running the AEM CAI for the Veloster on my 2013 Accent. I did this due to major power loss in the summer in Florida due to heat saturation, It solved that problem for sure .I get a little beter gas mileage as well. I can easily get 40 mpg highway.

Did you need to remove the front bumper to install it?

thanks
 

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Does anyone have an experience or opinion about Storm springs? Looks like there is an option for our Accent. It's probably been around for years now, but I forgot about it or never heard about it.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Storm-Lowe...is-2011-2017/142363623859?hash=item21258881b3


Storm springs - good mod, bad as in not worth it, or flat out dangerous? I could be a guinea pig here, but I'd rather ask around to see if anyone has done it first. It's getting to be strut and shock time for Lazy_H. Maybe some tighter springs too, if they're not an accident waiting to happen.
 

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I hope that rear drum to disc conversion goes right for you. As a GS owner I was interested in trying that myself, but some other posters were of the opinion that the ABS computer will never accept or work with the new disc brakes. If you try it and it goes well please let us know how to do it - thanks!
 

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I have a question for anyone who has replaced the rear axle bushings, or who has experience with these kinds of things:
What do you use to press the new bushings into place? I mean specifically the kind of arbor to use to push on them, not whether to use a hydraulic shop press vs. a forcing screw. The problem will be is the same it seems to me whichever tool you use to do the shoving with.

Here is a video of the operation, done in this case with a forcing screw:
(Skip ahead to 2:15 to get to the reinstallation part and the tools used)

The arbor used to push the bushing in here looks like your basic stepped arbor - one side stepped, the other side flat. If the arbor is what it seems to be, you will be pushing on the center steel sleeve of the new bushing. It will get compressed and displaced like a quarter or 1/8 inch or so before you start making contact with or can press on the surrounding rubber material and/or outer casing. Seems like a bad idea! It appears to work for this guy, but it can't be the right way? There is a very thin ring of steel exposed around the rubber puck, and I actually do have a wheel bearing cup that (just) catches that edge. But that seems like maybe not enough to push on safely? The steel casing isn't very thick and the exposed ring is minimal area. It might possibly deform or crack under pressure.
I also have another arbor/cup out of the same wheel bearing kit that can make contact with the rubber cup avoiding the center sleeve. But it's not going to be spreading its force out over a wide area of the puck. Possibly I could find massive washers to help spread out the force. Don't want to be cutting into the rubber or polyurethane material with a thin edge.
What did you use? Or if you can't recommend that, what do you wish you had used instead?
Ideally I'd have a steel arbor turned on a lathe to be exactly the inverse of the shape of the new bushing (on its inboard face, minus the center sleeve), but if I went to that kind of expense, I might as well junk it all and buy a new car. It seems the next best thing might be a used bushing, with the center sleeve cut out, flipped around so that the rubber puck surfaces match up. But these parts seem to get gnarred up very badly during extracting - if you're chiseling the old one out like this guy did.
Thanks for any advice!
 

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I found a bushing kit, with a set of forcing screws and cups like Igor used for sale on amazon, and I have it already along with the Siberian polyurethane bushings. I think it's exactly the same.

The marking on the receiving cup in his video says "D78", and there is one of those in the kit. That matches my measurement of the axle joint around the bearing - 78mm. So I'm sure that cup will fit the outside of the axle. Nothing fits on the inside of the axle joint of course on account of the way they made the bushing, with the flare covering up the joint the way it does.

The kit has long, coarse, acme threaded rods for forcing. These rods have thrust bearings on them. There are 21mm nuts on those bearings to drive them, and it was inevitable somehow that didn't have any 21 mm wrenches. So I'm waiting on some to arrive. I wondered about Igor's choice of wrench -open style- on both inboard and outboard sides of his installation set up. I think I get it now - we don't want to round off the nuts by holding them on the angles, we also need to apply considerable force, but we also need to be able to rapidly reposition our wrenches because the screw is probably turning some and generating slack on the outboard side, so open ended makes sense. But since I don't have a lift or a helper, it's gonna be very awkward lying underneath the axle joint, and trying to use open ended wrenches for this would just make all of that awkwardness worse. To keep a good grip and to minimize my time under the car, I just bought a 21mm flare nut wrench to back up the cup on the outside and also a 21mm "scaffold spanner" with "podger" to the drive the new bushing from the inside. This tool was a new thing to me. Looks like this:
17-19mm Scaffold Spanner Ratcheting Socket Wrench Flat Satin Cr-v Ratchet Podger Tool

The scaffold spanner/podger is like a ratcheting wrench, but with a socket head. (The handle tapers to a point for all your podging needs.) The socket is open on both ends so it can be moved down the rod, unlike a normal socket. The one I ordered has a 6 pointed socket, 21mm on one end, 19 on the other. 6 pointed ratcheting wrenches seem to be very uncommon for some reason. i just hope that the ratchet mechanism in this thing is strong enough to do the job without breaking. If not, it's gonna be a bad day.

Along with the bushing press in kit and the new bushings I also have a set of HF chisels now for this job. One of the chisels is long and pointy like the one Igor made from a shock absorber rod, but definitely smaller. I expect I'll be relying on that one for most of the operation. One cause for concern is, again, the awkwardness of the working position. Hammering on the bushing while lying on one side, or the other, or squatting isn't going to be anything like hammering from a standing position. This makes getting an air hammer + chisel bit very tempting, to have around just in case things bog down. Also the neighborhood has been too quiet lately.
 
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